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Sins of a homeless heart

dealing with life , dreams, love and lust,

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Poems Of A Naked Heart

Finding a way to the sacred path of the warriors

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The way to the ageless beauty

body care, mind care,

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In the delicious freedom

         The night is ours, and you are mine... whatever along with.

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photo collection By May Ram

I don't like to clothe but I know when must and when not. Don't you believe me? 

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Words of an untamed mind

  Negativity is boring It is so true, I wonder

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Memories of a homeless heart

  Today is the day I suffer the most every year since 2007.

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Brief notes to My precious

Brief notes to My precious  

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a mind-messer

  A request Request: Would you please delete me                  from your list, if you love me?                   Love and kisses, May

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A Devilish Female

  A teaser   Good morning Handsome, She just came With a framing thought.

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My precious in action

  My precious’s aquarium Brandon, my precious,  has many hobbies. One of them is fishes, anything to do with fish, fishing,  aquarium, books about  fishes, deep sea fishes,….  You name it. Except eating fish.

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my favourite collections

  Living Brush Bodypainting Art It is, one-of-a-kind artwork that celebrate the human form,  something to offer that is unique, compelling and unforgettable.

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Wonderful males by May Ram

  A heartless sinner   You stay and wait, in the cold  dark silence, For a prey to come

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My favourite jewellery and Gemstones

  The burmese Ruby Tiara  

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Me and my precious

Absolute power corrupts absolutely?

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Me and FanBox

My Heart is still with you!

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Educating Children

  Let’s talk about SEX How to Talk with Your Children About Sex?     I was born and raised in Asia ,very different culture, society than the culture and society in Netherlands, Europe. In my motherland, we don’t talk about sex, never seen any kissing, no movies involving sex of any kinds, not even kissing on lips, nor French kiss. So for my parents and parents there have no reason to even think about how to inform and guide children, in sex and sexuality. It’s kind of forbidden to talk about.

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heart touchers

I love her, her look, her songs and the way she sang.

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Time to have fun

A compilation of Pinky's ponderings through seasons one and two of Pinky and the Brain. :   Funny comment

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Reasons to cherish life

  I still hear him saying “I am afraid , my love”.

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My favourite TV series

 The aftermath of the temporal anomalies leaves Nick and Helen retaining their memories of the present, but for his friend,

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My son's favourite TV-series

Tutenstein Season 1 Episode 4 I Did It My Way What did this mummy kid again?

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A lonely planet

Beauties    Once upon a time, I was there, I remember now,   How elegant we look, How solf and kind we are... I remember now.

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Let’s Chat

Let’s Chat Introduction Many of my fans are wondering whether I am real or not.

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Let's talk about life by May Ram

    A Single mother It wasn’t my choice that I became a single mother, It must be a choice of god. Because He has taken away the one I loved

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Let’s share the colourful world

  Good morning (Love me to love you.) May This morning me and my precious walked to his school. As usual, I was a listener and he was a great talker. We walked, .. he talked, …I listened,…

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Heartbreakers by May Ram

  A creation of god   Now I am mad, Am I…? I am sad am I? I feel helpless, Do I?

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my collective memories

  my collective memories   A girl without water lilies   I sit here , So alone, In the deadly silence… I wonder, My love, Where you are!!!!

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Girl’s talk

People talk about complexion. Fair one wants to get darker, and dark one wants to get fair. No being can satisfy us, humans. Here how the people with fair complexion in try to get tanned.

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History of bikini by May Ram

Bikini that Blocks UV Rays This is an article for the bikini lovers and sunbeathers.

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Contest by May Ram

Who is the most amazing Genie in the world? Since lately, everyday I log on fanbox, here he is waiting with the smile.

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My FanBox Experience By May Ram

My dear empowr citizens, Good day everyone! Here I am again, to share one of my great emowr/FanBox experiences. One of many results  of working along with empowr/FanBox team and the community in a symbiotic relatrionship in a harmony.   The topic is,  How I utilize my earnings in the most productive way, for myself and for the community. With my immediate earning profits (without waiting to be matured), I just bought an iPhone 6 Plus in the empowr/FanBox Marketplace, to replace my iPhone 5 S. It is an amazing device. Taken with iPhone 5s 

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Naturism by May Ram

  I found a very interesting article regarding with nudity and islam. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I have a vision for a better Britain. As the French government banned the niqab or ‘face veil’ in 2010, some Muslims in the UK and other parts of the Western world are becoming increasingly nervous. “What if this type of right-wing, anti-Muslim campaign extends throughout Europe and North America? What if it doesn’t stop with niqab? What if next, they want to ban the hijab too? In France they’ve already done that in schools, and other public spaces!”

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Genetic Science

  Genetic Science What is DNA? Let’s examine a Group of cells in your inner ear.   They help support the function of hearing.

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All about Aphrodite

Aphrodite movie

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Angels among us by May Ram

  Angels among us Nicole   She makes me cry with her writing,

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Journey through my chaotic mind

  Is there god?  Many are talking about God. I was thinking why I or any of us need a god. Mainly Why I need one.

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Un-told stories

   Be the best   Good afternoon every one,   Never stop learning, Learning to be the best, the Best to serve the world, To make a better place.

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EuroNews: Netherlands

Netherlands 'does most for poor' World leaders vowed to "make poverty history" last year

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Naked news

Naturism numbers are reportedly up in the heatwave   More people have applied to become naturists at a Gloucestershire club since the current heatwave began.

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Cars by May Ram

Cars Mercedes   I am not fond of cars, I even got rid of our car after my beloved passed away.   But many men who owns the cars , fond of me.

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My Vacations

Vacation 2012 Hello everyone, Tomorrow I am leaving to Cyprus for my vacation. Therefore I will not be able to answer any of your questions immediately.

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The naked goddess

    Kali Maa

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Beautiful Males on FanBox

  The  truth   Coming here on Fanbox, Every day, Seeing you here,

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Cypriot Jokes

CYPRIOTS AND THE OLD LADY   Five Cypriots are talking to a very old, very wise lady. She wants to know what city they come from. The first one replies:

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Cyprus by May Ram

Greek Goddess Style I was fascinated by ancient greek fashion, since I was a little girl.

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Love making for the first time

Story by Tracey Truthfully, I never thought I would loose my virginity at such a tender age. I had always agreed with my friends and made a promise to wait till the evening of our weddings.. the so called HONEYMOON.

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Rutger Hauer

 Wanted Dead Or Alive A talented, sexy,hot Dutch actor.

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Robert Graves

      The Naked And The Nude   by Robert Graves

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Love in Islam by May Ram

How to Reciprocate God’s Love in Islam Act in a manner that would please God

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Love in Christianity by May Ram

  $exual  Sin s In Christianity   Love, $ex and relationships! We all want to be loved, appreciated and have pleasure and fulfillment in our lives.

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Contest videos

  My second attempt My home It is still without JC or anyone else, because I don’t want to put any of you in my worst video.

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Movies by May Ram

  Movies Angelina Jolie ' Original Sin ' Inside Reel

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love by May Ram

I am in love   You, Once in a year, I meet.

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Social kissing

Social kissing   Introduction We in europe, kiss a lot. Especially in Holland.

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My Curiosity By May Ram

I was recently in Cyprus, and I have heard a lot about differences between Greeks and Turkish. Here is a video, and tell me what you think?

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Polygamy by May Ram

      Polygamy (plurality of wives) is one of the controversial questions in the family system of Islam. The following are a few points worth of consideration in an effort to clarify the wisdom of polygamy and when it can be used:    Islam has emphasized that taking advantage of the permission of polygamy is

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Love in Buddhism

Love and Kindness: A Buddhist Point of View 

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Violation?

  Violation? Do you know that not every viedios on youtube is suit with fanBox terms?

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Timeless beauty

Iman Mohamed Abdulmajid is a Somali model. The daughter of a Somali diplomat, Iman attended high school in Egypt and Kenya. She studied political science at the University of Nairobi until she was recruited to model by American.

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$exiest Men

I have never known any male models from netherlands, till today. They too are really handsome and have natural look among top Male Models around the world.

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The simplest FanBox guides

Dear New and Return FanBox member, Many of you are frustrated with why your Success Coaches are not answering your questions. They actually did answer and answering within 24 hours.   You can find all their replies Down in the link.  Read your Coach Answers (click on it)

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Thoughts by May Ram

  I was born as a woman, I must behave like a woman. I must act like a woman. Feel like a woman. Let's start with shoes, many women crazy about. I want shoes with beauty and comfort, style and health. So I go for Italian Shoes and look what I found.  Women and Shoes  

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Hot, hotter, and the hottest

The 25-year-old beauty queen pledged to help Angola move past its history of war and impoverishment. She also plans to focus on HIV advocacy worldwide.

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Online stories by May Ram

  This is my very first online love story.

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Living in nude

You will sleep like a baby. Here are a few tips for sleeping naked.

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secret wars

   The Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi is the daughter of Burma's liberation leader Aung San and showed an early interest in Gandhi's philosophy of non-violent protest.

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Is Homosexuality a Choice?

Is Homosexuality a Choice? I alwyas wonder about it.

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Body, Spirit and Soul

“When there is light in the soul, there is beauty in the person When there is beauty in the person, there is harmony in the home When there is harmony in the home, there is honor in the nation When there is honor in the nation, there is peace in the world” —Old Chinese Proverb

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The Royal family of the Netherlands

19 februari 2011, Lech am Arlberg, De Koninklijke Familie is in Lech op wintersport. De jaarlijkse fotosessie in Lech wordt dit jaar niet alleen gehouden met de koningin en de gezinnen van prins Willem-Alexander en prins Constantijn, maar ook met het gezin van prins Friso. Daarom zijn ook alle kleinkinderen van koningin Beatrix present.

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My Curiosity (Religions)

People talk a lot about heaven and hell. I have found an interesting article about heaven. Written By Kusala. The author  I've had the good fortune of speaking about Buddhist afterlife to a number of Christians. One of the things that prompted me to investigate Buddhist afterlife was giving a talk at Central Juvenile Hall. A Catholic girl said I was going to hell, because I didn't believe in God and Jesus Christ.

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Memories by May Ram

It was in end of 2007, I was sad and isolated, by my anger,

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Myanmar (Birma)

Wild Burma Nature's Lost Kingdom Episode 2 BBC full documentary 2013 For the first time in over 50 years, a team of wildlife filmmakers from the BBC's Natural History Unit and scientists from the world renowned Smithsonian Institution has been granted access to venture deep into Burma's impenetrable jungles. Their mission is to discover whether these forests are home to iconic animals, rapidly disappearing from the rest of the world - this expedition has come not a moment too soon.

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Dance by May Ram

I was surprised that they do alos like pole dancing. And you?

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Kama Sutra by May Ram

Kama Sutra - the Manual For Yesterday Still Teaches Us Today

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Fashion Design

Purely and totally unislamic, Some people said that.    But I find it very elegant and beautiful fashoin. 

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Wondering Girls and boys

Wondering Girls and boys   Girls/Boys what do you do to feel sexy? 

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Flying Teachers

     I may have been lost, but I have never forgotten and given up one of my goals, which is,

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The naked Truth

What happens in our bed rooms?

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Human Rights by May Ram

There are many different kinds of slavery, but in basic terms, the practice involves owning someone else in some manner.

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My dream places

Italy – A Place With Natural Beauty Italy- where has all the natural beauty a person wishes to see. Venice (Old City), a name which later became synonym to architectural excellence, Italy is the biggest producers of wine. For Traveling, a country like Italy provides lot of enjoyment, entertainment and pleasure which you will remember for all your life. My team has collected few pictures of the natural beauty of Italy, which will give you a clear idea that for tourism Italy is a must go place.  

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Curiosity (History)

A Dutch court is expected to rule if survivors of a massacre carried out more than 60 years ago will get compensation. According to Indonesian researchers, Dutch troops wiped out almost the entire male population of a village in West Java, two years before the former colony declared independence in 1949. Most Indonesians do not know about the massacre that took place in Rawagede.

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Power within by May Ram

If you feel like complaining about your life, Look at her.

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sports Photos

Women catch "me", kick " me", but never keep "me".   Why? Check it out!

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The Naked Chat

  The Naked Chat The translation May: On textile sites, most people translate nude=sex.  

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Your right to know

This video is a heart wrenching look at the damage already done to the wildlife and habitat of the Gulf Region, following the disaster of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Rig.

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Do you know? by May Ram

Have you ever heard of Physical Virginity Tests?

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Living Positively by May Ram

Success Stories SLEEP Without enough sleep I find myself struggling—moving through my day the way it feels to move through water.  Everything is harder and slower and I feel stressed all day because I have to push myself to focus and be alert. Besides the headaches this gives me, I have much less energy, am less creative, and can only concentrate on one thing at a time instead of being able to handle several things at once. Moreover, when I am so low on energy, I tend to isolate myself and not interact as much with coworkers or to participate spontaneously in conversations. I'll usually resort to having coffee to try and boost my energy and alertness levels but the caffeine high only works for a short period. Afterward, I'll be even more tired because my body has been running on overdrive. It's not a good way to operate.

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Collection of unique photos

Beautiful collage of pictures with adorable children and fantastic music to boot.  Asian Blue eyes

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Abstract Art by May Ram

Raw, dramatic, passionate. Playful bold colors.   That how I relax.

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Speed painting

I love blue eyes, and I love art as well as artists. Here is a black girl with amazing blue eyes.

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Collection of Creative Recycling

The Trash to Fashion Awards show began more than a decade ago as a small community-based celebration and has been transformed into New Zealand's largest theatrical and visual experience of its type. Fashion all made from reused and recycled materials.

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Is it Sport?

Many of you will think that pole dancing has little to do with sports.   Wait until you've seen this video. Can you do it too?

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Jokes by May Ram

Jokes Since the multiple language program in advertising has been launched, we, Success Coaches got busy translating the non-english ads.

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World of Mathematics

  "Life is an unfoldment, and the further we travel, the more truth we comprehend. To understand the things that are at our door is the best preparation for understanding those that lie beyond."

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Why? by May Ram

Why? I hate to clothe, I only clothe when I must. Then I wonder why humans supposed to wear clothes.

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Nothing Serious by May Ram

Everybody wants to rule the world! When a motivator needs motivation, what does she do? Gone Fishing!

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Fully Integrated in to Dutch Society

Fully Integrated in to Dutch Society Now I question myself, whether or not I am fully integrated in to Dutch Society.

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History of Myanmar

Who kill General Aung San? Was British government behind?

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News From NL

 Teachers strike against extra hours 26/01/2012   More than 12,500 secondary-school teachers and other staff are on strike today. They are angry at draft legislation being pushed through parliament by Education Minister Marja van Bijsterveld.

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Dating by May Ram

Holland strives to construct a truly egalitarian society in which a person’s ethnicity, religion and gender won’t affect their s chances in life. As a result some of the usual European gender rules have got a little blurred and the rules of romance are a little different in Holland.

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Chain of command

Chain of command The order in which authority and power in an

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Heros by May Ram

Hero of Burma General Aung San was born on 13 Feb 1915, Natmauk, Myanmar. He was the Myanmar nationalist leader and assassinated hero who was instrumental in securing Myanmar's independence from Great Britain. Before World War II Aung San was actively anti-British; he then allied with the Japanese during World War II, but switched to the Allies before leading the Myanmar drive for autonomy.

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Male vs Female by May Ram

Today I needed to relax, so I was visiting a funny post and looking for more. Look here what I found.

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Myanmar Models

Myanmar Long Hair Show These are beautiful burmese ladies and it's not because of their long hair. It's because of their culture. Could you get any other type of women to be so graceful and orderly in a show?

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Killers by May Ram

AKA 'Big Father', AKA 'The Old Man', AKA 'Number One'. Ne Win means 'Brilliant as the Sun' or 'Sun of Glory'.

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Random Curiosity

Extremely Bizarre Malfunctions Of The Body BY  FLAMEHORSE  10It is interesting that we deem a disorder or disease “bizarre” precisely because of its rarity. One disease may be more visually repulsive than another, but in the end, we’re most impressed by whichever rare disorder we just don’t understand. If brains that block fear or stomachs that brew beer were as common as the cold, maybe they wouldn’t raise any eyebrows. But for now, they seem like examples of some of the very strange conditions that the human body can experience.

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Beautiful Females

Here are some arts of mysterious beauty. But I am not sure whether or not I sense freedom of being of humans. Please enlighten me.

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quotes by May Ram

If people do not believe that mathematics is simple, it is only because they do not realize how complicated life is. 

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Exclusive: PETAs Pet Killing Program Set a New Rec

Exclusive: PETAs Pet Killing Program Set a New Record in 2008 Public Records: PETA Found Adoptive Homes for Less than 1 out of 300 Animals Animal lovers worldwide now have access to more than a decades worth of proof that People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) kills thousands of defenseless pets at its Norfolk, Virginia headquarters. Since 1998, PETA has opted to put down 21,339 adoptable dogs, cats, puppies, and kittens instead of finding homes for them.

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Test by May Ram

This Eid al-Fitr Muslim holiday, Malaysian Sharifa Ahmad is determined to make heads turn in her "Made in Indonesia" outfit -- a black flowing chiffon robe with embroidered neckline and matching headscarf hand stitched with Swarovski crystals. "The dress is perfect for the holy day -- modest yet elegant. I'm definitely going to rock my little black Islamic dress," the 35-year-old civil servant told AFP. Ahmad is among a growing number of Muslim fashionistas across the region who visit Indonesia to splurge on new festive clothes to celebrate the end of the Ramadan fasting month, which falls on Sept. 10.

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Music by May Ram

This piece of music is fused with mild Binaural, Monaural and Isochronic tones.  These types of tones stimulate the brain and comfort the mind helping you to get into a more tranquil and settled state for a deep relax. Only at this state can you truly feel free powerful, focused and ready to explore you!

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Success by May Ram

7 things you can do to reach the success you truly desire Ever have those days where no matter what you try life seems to be a series of one step forward and two steps back? Well today is the very best day to take charge of your life and develop strategies to achieve personal success.

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Seduction by May Ram

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Photography by May Ram

Small is beautiful: stunning macro photographs of ice and snow By Kate Day Photography    Cold weather might be miserably inconvenient for most of us but there’s no denying that it can also be breath-takingly beautiful.

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Latest News On FanBox

Graduation in 2 days If you are an old FanBoxer away from FanBox for so long, and you came back finally and see all the changes and improvements. You maybe overwhelmed by that.

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Sins of a Homeless Heart (2)

Life is here , You are not, Is it a life?

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Love Contest

Please forgive me for delay. I was making dinner for my precious.   On my birthday I used to buy something for my precious. This year he is almost 11. And he told me today, "Mama, today is your birthday, I will do anything for you. And all for you. Oh he is growing up so fast mantally. and so matured.

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Delicious Dishes

  Benefits of Pumpkin Those wonderful days of autumn are upon us. The season of goodies and goblins is sure to include a pumpkin or jack-o-lantern or two. But, before you trash that sagging pumpkin on your porch, think again. The pumpkin has much more to offer than crooked smiles or a menial filling for holiday pies.

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Introduction by May Ram

A Single Dad From England (A man with Blue eyes 2)   He is one of my blue eyed naturist friends for about 2 years now.

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Colours and Nature

15 Diamonds That Made Headlines in 2013 In 2013, diamonds were everyone’s best friend. Check out 15 of the most jaw-dropping, wondrous, luminescent, and headline-grabbing diamonds this year had to offer.

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Men and Women by May Ram

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Animation by May Ram

We human talk about peace, but Do you really believe that we are peaceful creatures? Check this out.

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May Ram

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Success On FanBox By May Ram

The frustration I am hearing everywhere on FanBox. I understand it because I am a human too.

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Minds by May Ram

How to Clear Your Mind and Soul of Negativity  Many people have been through a lot in their life time. Negative seeds have been sown into their hearts and as they grow up these negative seeds begin to grow and get stronger and more difficult to get rid of. Its almost like planting an Oak tree seed, and leaving it to grow: it will grow and become big and strong, and the roots go so deep into the ground it is almost impossible to uproot. If you follow these simple steps you can easily clear your mind and soul from negativity but you have to do it with an open heart, open mind and a spirit filled with hope.

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Money By May Ram

  Ayn Rand on money as a medium of exchange and whether it is a product of man's ability to think and achieve. Rearden heard Bertram Scudder, outside the group, say to a girl who made some sound of indignation, "Don't let him disturb you. You know, money is the root of all evil—and he's the typical product of money." Rearden did not think that Francisco could have heard it, but he saw Francisco turning to them with a gravely courteous smile.

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Poisons

  When I stick with "I", then I suffer the pleasure. It brings me more anger, and artificial peace. I am a creature of extreme emotions.

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Theory of Karma By May Ram

Law of karma - You and only You create your destiny

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My Curiosity in Beliefs

  My curiosity brings the following questions. Will we be chasing our tails if we try to answer if there is a God? Sometimes is the best answer "I don't know", rather than trying to fill in the gaps with our egos? Is it alright to say, "I don't know"? Will we know once we die, perhaps not even after that? Why are we uncomfortable with finality; reincarnation.   Will arguments on God improve our present moment?

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GOD by May Ram

What are the teachings of Budhhism? Did Buddha believe in one God?  by Dr. Zakir Naik

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Philosophy by May Ram

Ancient Greece Give me a lever long enough and a fulcrum on which to place it, and I shall move the world. - Archimedes

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Parenting By May Ram

  When I was 15, I was playing in the mud, climbing trees like a monkey.   But this girl is trying to get pregnant and get married to a so called mature man. Whatch them here in the videos, how mature they are and what kind of earning he has.

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Social Science

Quotes About Whining 1   Your complaints, your drama, your victim mentality, your whining, your blaming, and all of your excuses have NEVER gotten you even a single step closer to your goals or dreams. Let go of your nonsense. Let go of the delusion that you DESERVE better and go EARN it! Today is a new day!”  ― Steve Maraboli, Unapologetically You: Reflections on Life and the HumanExperience

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Some Tips By May Ram

Written by Mohammad Mustafa Ahmedzai    PayPal is a great Online Money transaction Service where people can send, receive, withdraw and hold payments. Around 80% of online money transfer is now made via PayPal. As I had mentioned in my previous post PayPal is banned in many countries like Egypt, Iraq, Afghanistan, Iran and Pakistan. Now even India is facing problems with PayPal's new policy. Now how can one really use PayPal in a country where PayPal does not function. The solution is more simple than you can Imagine. Follow up:

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politics by May Ram

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Some of my cash outs

Good morning my dear Courageous FanBox member, I have heard many naysayers screaming about how impossible it is to cash out, nowadays. It makes me questioned how can I be at their service to stop their that suffering.  Then I  remember a  Quote that my dad told me since I was a child: "Impossible is a word only to be found in the dictionary of a fool." We can reach our goals if we know what we want and if we are willing with commitment and persistence. I heard many cries and sadness, therefore I squeeze out my time and making this post to let you know you are not alone. I started just like you, all of you. I had no knowledge about what a blog is. I learn and grow, I learn like a beggar. I started  working  seriously with commitment on FanBox since August 2011, against all odds. I told my son that we live at minimum cost and build for the future since I am a widow in a foreign country, no family except my little boy. I have cashed out several times. You can see here http://posts.fanbox.com/1l3m5 I build up my earning. I never rush to cash out , please see this http://prntscr.com/19zrfd And here is what our FanBox leader said about regarding with FanBox earnings: http://prntscr.com/19zs09   Would you like to know how much I can cash out in August ? Please click here http://prntscr.com/1jqw2u   ------------------ Here is my another Cash  on June 1, 2014. -------------------------- As a plain and simple " May Ram" can do this, so can you, and all of you. Whenever you face a challenge or difficulty, if you  give up and run away, then you will be doing that for the rest of your life as a Coward. We are FanBox members. We do not give up. Giving up is not in our FanBox dictionary.

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New blog by May Ram

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May And The Politics

Whever I hear "Politics", the silence in me grows tremendously. I never took serious about what is happenning to me regarding with that silence. When it comes to Politics, When I hear "Please give me advice, or ideas" them my mind translate to "keep quiet". When I hear freedom from a politician,  Then I started think what is happening to me.  Am I Politicophobic? 

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The Greatest Mathematicians of All Time

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My favourite Flowers

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My favourite Flowers by May Ram

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My Favourite FanBox Providers

My Favourite FanBox Providers A beautiful recycle art.

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Amazing Or Interesting by May Ram

Tiny brain implant to treat PTSD The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, has announced the start of a five-year, $26 million effort to develop brain implants that can treat mental disease with deep-brain stimulation. The hope is to implant electrodes in different regions of the brain along with a tiny chip placed between the brain and the skull. The chip would monitor electrical signals in the brain and send data wirelessly back to scientists in order to gain a better understanding of psychological diseases like Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). The implant would also be used to trigger electrical impulses in order to relieve symptoms. DARPA has chosen two teams that will pursue different approaches. A team from the University of California San Francisco will use direct recording, stimulation, and therapy to take advantage of the brain's plasticity. Circuits that appear to drive pathology would be rewired, and eventually the patient could remove the implants. Artist concept of the chip next to photos of existing devices. Photo: DARPA The team from Massachusetts General Hospital will attempt a "trans-diagnostic" approach to isolate elements that are common to psychiatric and neurologic diseases such as anxiety, memory failure, and delayed reaction time. Real-time brain recordings will trace pathological symptoms down to single neurons. If successful, this method will enable further testing that could lead to targeted treatment and diagnostics. "DARPA is in the business of creating not just science, but new technologies," program manager Justin Sanchez said in a statement. "The neurotechnologies we will work to develop... could give new tools to the medical community to treat patients who don’t respond to other therapies, and new knowledge to the neuroscience community to expand the understanding of brain function." IT'S VERY AMBITIOUS, BUT THERE IS A LOT TO GAIN The program, called Systems-Based Neurotechnology for Emerging Therapies (SUBNETS), is one of the first manifestations of a $100 million brain-mapping research initiative announced by President Barack Obama last year. Current treatments range from talk therapy to medications to psychedelic drugs, but PTSD remains a major challenge for the military. The SUBNETS program is a typical DARPA undertaking, which means success is far from certain. But if it works, it could have a massive impact on the millions of sufferers of PTSD and other anxiety disorders that account for nearly a third of the country's mental health care costs.

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The Royal Ruby (Padamyar Ngamauk)

    Col. Sladen (Brithish Army)

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Beauty of Seas

  Diving in Myanmar Dive the Mergui Archipelago and the Burma Banks In the Andaman Sea, to the north of the Thai border lie the largely undisturbed seas of Myanmar. Since the area was only opened up to tourism in 1997, divers who choose to liveaboard dive in Burma feel a great sense of privilege at witnessing the awesome sights above and below the surface of the Mergui region (also known as Myeik) that has remained untouched for years.

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Photography by user37749302

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Festivals in Myanmar

Thingyan Festival or the Water Festival preceding the Burmese New Year is the most celebrated festival in Myanmar. It is wreathed with fantastic tales and folklore, but Buddhist in spirit. People keep fast, give alms and do good deeds. There is goodwill and loving-kindness all around.

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Top 10 Fascinating Carnivorous Plants

Aldrovanda vesiculosa Aldrovanda vesiculosa, also known as the waterwheel plant, is a fascinating rootless, carnivorous, aquatic plant. It generally feeds on small aquatic vertebrates, using a trap mechanism called a snap trap.

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Burmese Lady Hero

Political Life   Aung San Suu Kyi speaking to her supporters (1988)   In 1988, while Aung San Suu Kyi was in Burma taking care of her mother, Burma’s military dictator since 1962, General Ne Win, resigned on July 23rd – prompting pro-democracy protests throughout the country. On August 8th, there was a nation-wide uprising that the military junta in power suppressed by killing thousands of demonstrates.   Suu Kyi’s first political action was sending an open letter to the Burmese government “asking for formation of independent consultative committee to prepare multi-party elections.” * However, the militaristic government instead created the State Law and Order Restoration Council (SLORC) which prohibited the rights of the Burmese people – limiting the number of people could gather to discuss politics and arrests and/or prosecution without a trial are reinstated. Despite the attempts of complete government control by the military junta, on September 24th, the National League for Democracy (NLD) was formed, with Aung San Suu Kyi as its Secretary-General.

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The Lotus by May Ram

The Story of the Lotus Flower This post is part of The Awakened Heart Project Week 1: The Story of the Lotus Flower Given that The Awakened Heart Projectis about helping you release your fears, to grow, to discover, to learn and to awaken, the story of the lotus flower and its symbolism seems like the perfect place to start this journey. The lotus flower is a beautiful flower that can be found all over the world. But the start of this flowers life is not as beautiful is one might image. It’s unlike many other flowers. When the lotus first begins to sprout, it is under water, making its home in lakes and ponds in areas where the water remains fairly still on the surface. But underneath the surface, the lotus is surrounded by mud and muck and by fish, by insects, and simply dirty, rough conditions

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Animated Images

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How To Make Money Happily On FanBox

I thought for some time to make this blog. But due to 24 hours a day, has limited me not to be able to do.

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Interesting Articles By May Ram

Burmese beauty queen 'vanishes with tiara' from pageant May Myat Noe alleged to have run off with crown after contest organisers said she should have breast enhancement operation

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Amazing Creatures By May Ram

How many eyes can one animal have? Article and Photographs by David Denning Article and Photographs by David Denning It may come as a surprise, but not all animals have two eyes. True enough, most familiar animals ARE "binocular", but you don't have to go very far to find out that TWO does not always RULE.   Pineal Eye Four Legs and A Third Eye? It's pretty common knowledge that vertebrate animals have two eyes, but this was not always the case. Our earliest fish-like ancestors, evolved with a third hole in their skulls and an eye that connected directly to the brain called the pineal eye. It appears that this adaptation became converted over time to a small organ associated with the control of hormone production

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Top 10 Most Beautiful Birds In The World.

  Birds are an important part of the world we live in with over 10,000 genus. Although, the total number of birds are innumerable but here for the sake of discussion, I will mention only the top ten birds which exhibit the most exquisiteness and are very delightful. In most cases we will find male birds to be of more magnificence as compared to their female counter-parts in order to attract them towards their good looks. Birds have a varied role in the human life as some past civilizations had them as a part of their culture while others take them as favorite pets and keep them in their homes. Here below we have list of  Top 10 Most Beautiful Birds In The World.

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Science Articles

What Are Dreams?   What are dreams and why do we have them? NOVA joins leading dream researchers as they embark on a variety of neurological and psychological experiments to investigate the world of sleep and dreams. Delving deep into the thoughts and brains of a variety of dreamers.

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Space School

Neptune is the outermost planet of the gas giants.  Get to know Neptune on Space School!

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The Universe by May Ram

Documentary describing some of the strangest things in the universe.

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Science Fiction Movies

In Time It is the year 2169 and people have been genetically engineered to be born with a digital clock, bearing 1 year of time, on their forearm. At the age of 25 a person stops aging, but their clock begins counting down; when it reaches zero, that person "times out" and dies instantly. Time on these clocks has become the universal currency; by touching arms, one person can transfer it to another, or to or from a separate clock (a "time capsule") that can be shipped or safely stored in a "time bank".

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Finding Gadgets

Finding Gadgets Asus Zenbook UX21 review   TechRadar rating 4/5 FOR Light and slim Sandy Bridge power Strong Carry case supplied Great battery life AGAINST Pricey for an 11-inch machine Small keyboard Limited connectivity Frustrating track pad   One of the best 11-inch laptops - but can it justify its price?

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Courage to Live Lives Of Success

  Want To Be Happier? 10 Things You Should STOP Doing Right NOW

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Fantasy Movies

A romantic police captain breaks a beautiful member of a rebel group out of prison to help her rejoin her fellows, but things are not what they seem. During the reign of the Tang dynasty in China, a secret organization called "The House of the Flying Daggers" rises and opposes the government. A police officer called Leo sends officer Jin to investigate a young dancer named Mei, claiming that she has ties to the "Flying Daggers". Leo arrests Mei, only to have Jin breaking her free in a plot to gain her trust and lead the police to the new leader of the secret organization. But things are far more complicated than they seem... 

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Kiss Of Dew

Morning Dews  Watching the morning dew is the most refreshing view that helps relax your mind and soul. Capturing such a beautiful moment can be exciting as well as a fun activity. The morning dew pictures are mostly taken before sunrise or in the evening and capture the droplets in a very impressive way. This requires a lot of practice and patience. In this post there are over forty stunning morning dew photos for your inspiration. Feel free to share your opinion which one is your favorite!                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Bejewelled Golden Globes – Feather Morning Dew Bokeh

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Morning Dew Photography

Dew is water in the form of droplets that appears on thin, exposed objects in the morning or evening. In this post I am going to showcase some really beautifully captured photographs of morning dew.    Dew on Grass

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Ancient World by May Ram

The Western world is built on the wisdom and traditions of the ancient Greeks, who uncovered the fundamental principles that established the basics of modern technology.

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Amazing Flowers By May

Flower Show Bloemencorso In Holland   Advertising   Advertising   Amazing, aren't they?

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New History of Humanity

Who are You?...  Really!... Anybody who believe's that they have a very good reason for being racist to another of god's cosmic conscious creations because of its colour or that it looks a little different from what it has been used to, needs to sit down and educate themselves as to their true Roots, Evolution is to Change and adapt to your environment, or Die!...

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Stories from the Stone Age

Stories from the Stone Age An exploration of the revolutionary period of prehistory that began when humans abandoned the nomadic hunting and gathering existence they had known for millennia to take up a completely new way of life the decisive move to farming and herding the ration of permanent settlements and the discovery of metals setting the stage for the arrival of the worlds first civilisation.

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Insteresting Questions and Answers

Insteresting Questions and Answers Why truthful & god fearing people have to struggle a lot?             Q : Why is it so that people who are truthful, god fearing, have to struggle a lot in their lives, to achieve anything they have to work harder in comparison to those who are ruthless, cruel and unethical.  Chitwinder

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Dealing with Disappointment

Helping a Depressed Person How to Reach Out and Help Someone While Taking Care of Yourself When a family member or friend suffers from depression, your support and encouragement can play an important role in his or her recovery. However, depression can also wear you down if you neglect your own needs. These guidelines can help you support a depressed person while maintaining your own emotional equilibrium.

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The Cells in Our Body

The human body is the most complicated machine in the world. We see with it, hear with it, breathe with it, walk and run with it, and sense pleasure with it. Its bones, muscles, arteries, veins and internal organs are organized with marvellous design, and when we examine this design in detail we find even more amazing facts. Every part of the body, though each may seem to be so different from another, is made up of the same material: cells. 

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Short Love Story by May Ram

"When you Love Someone" tells the story of a boy who tries to run away from his love, after realising that his memories are the only thing he still keeps from his past.

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Hypocrites

Symptoms & Self Examination     Most individuals involved in hypocrisy are arrogant at the very least and most likely narcisist. They already believe that they are smarter, more creative and completely superior to humanity as a whole. They are selfish and self centered. (I am now going to get a little personal...) How many of us have done - on a smaller scale - what Blair took to a whole new level?

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Stephen King's Films

Stephen King's Films   The Stand At a remote U.S. Army base, a weaponized strain of influenza, officially known as Project Blue and nicknamed "Captain Trips", is accidentally released. Despite an effort to put the base under lockdown, a security malfunction allows a soldier, Charles Campion, to escape with his family. By the time the military tracks the already-deceased Campion to Texas, he has triggered a pandemic of apocalyptic proportions which eventually kills off 99.4% of the world's human population.

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Powers

Powers Why Power Corrupts and Absolute Power Corrupts Absolutely?   The option to impose one's will on another is an option that position alone wrongly affords all too many individuals. Indeed this option to impose on, rather than work with, this option to impose on without any regard whatsoever for due process, becomes, in the hands of most, a license to harm, if not destroy the careers and lives of others. People do, after all, inexplicably lose their jobs; careers do get gently nudged onto the rocks; professional marginalization does occur; first-rate organizational, social and political initiatives do encounter untenable resistance, if they are not obstructed altogether; minority oppression does occur; individual whim decimates cultures and destroys countries.

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Einsein

Einstein How Albert Einstein's Brain Worked! n his last years of life, Albert Einstein knew he was ill and refused operations that would save his life. He made his wishes clear: "I want to be cremated so people won't come to worship at my bones" [source: Paterniti]. Einstein died on April 18, 1955, at the age of 76 of a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurism, and he got his wish as far as his bones were concerned; his ashes were scattered in an undisclosed location. But Einstein's brain was a different matter.

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Human Anatomy by May Ram

Human Anatomy  A Doctor walks you through an animated video about the amazing human heart.

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History Channel - Clash of the Gods

The story of Zeus and how he led the Olympians to defeat the Titans and gain control of the universe.

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The Creative Spark

Kirby Ferguson: Embrace the remix Nothing is original, says Kirby Ferguson, creator of Everything is a Remix. From Bob Dylan to Steve Jobs, he says our most celebrated creators borrow, steal and transform. About Kirby Ferguson

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Question Time

To inform, to educate and to entertain. Best traditions of the Corporation. David Dimbleby presents the topical debate from east London. On the panel are chief secretary to the treasury Danny Alexander, Labour's shadow secretary for work and pensions Rachel Reeves, former shadow home secretary David Davis, professor of classics at Cambridge University Dr Mary Beard and Nick Ferrari, LBC radio presenter.

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How to Paint!

  How To Draw 3D Sharks     This is outstanding artwork... I wish I could draw like this. Good to relax with such type of hobby

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Nelson Mandela by May Ram

Miracle Rising South Africa [ Full Movie ] SOUTH AFRICA is the epic legacy of South Africa's political transformation that culminated in the first free and fair elections in April 1994. Recounted through the personal accounts of key figures, both local and international, the documentary examines how South Africa avoided a civil war and moved towards, as Archbishop Desmond Tutu coined the phrase, "a rainbow nation." From the evil legacy of apartheid to the triumphant first democratic elections, Miracle Rising: South Africa moves beyond mere chronology and delves into the hearts and minds of the leaders and people of South Africa, culminating in the thrilling behind-the-scenes events of the elections that resulted in the joyful inauguration of President Nelson Mandela. Told through simple, intimate portraits of key players, it weaves a grand story of a nation into an intimate history of men and women determined to change the country for the best of all who live there. - Written by HISTORY

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Symbols by May Ram

Interesting The Top 15 Most Famous Symbols. These are symbols I have seen frequently in the past years or so. I am not including business logos or road signs or else it would be Top 50 Famous Symbols! 

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Dealing With People by May Ram

Six Tips on Dealing With Insecure People “A competent and self-confident person is incapable of jealousy in anything. Jealousy is invariably a symptom of neurotic insecurity.” – Lazurus Long

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Christmas& New Year by May Ram

HAPPY NEW YEAR 2014 CELEBRATIONS EVE PICTURES FIREWORKS WALLPAPERS Beautiful Happy New Year 2014 Eve Pictures Wallpapers have been posted in order to increase the zest and zeal of annually and internationally celebrated festival across the globe.

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Articles in the 101 Series

What’s on Your Bucket List? 101 Things To Do Before You Die “Every man dies – Not every man really lives.” ~ William Ross “The only people who fear death are those with regrets.” ~ Author Unknown

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Animated Christmas images

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Particle Physics

Particle Physics Gravity and the Standard Model Lawrence Berkeley Lab Scientist Andre Walker-Loud presents to high-school students and teachers, explaining the nature of the four fundamental forces, and how the standard model of particle physics relates to cosmology. He also talks about Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) and why his profession is both important and rewarding.

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Easy Kids Science Experiment Fireworks in a Jar

Easy Kids Science Experiments DENSITY TOWER Add the following to your glass in order. Use a funnel or the back of a spoon to help you slowly pour in each layer.

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World of Wonder

It shows on the third episode of BBC Invisible Worlds the amazing world of spiders. Their trap design and the strong silk they produce for it.

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A Better You by May Ram

Jane McGonigal: The game that can give you 10 extra years of life When game designer Jane McGonigal found herself bedridden and suicidal following a severe concussion, she had a fascinating idea for how to get better. She dove into the scientific research and created the healing game, SuperBetter. In this moving talk, McGonigal explains how a game can boost resilience -- and promises to add 7.5 minutes to your life.

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Jane McGonigal

This is an episode of REVOLUTIONARIES, a co-production of the Computer History Museum and KQED television, sponsored by Intel. Recorded: March 9, 2011, originally broadcast on January 23rd, 2012. "We're going to see games tackling women's rights. We're going to see games around climate change. We're going to see games around medical innovation that doctors are going to play." Jane McGonigal.

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Work Smarter For Success

Four-star general Stanley McChrystal shares what he learned about leadership over his decades in the military. How can you build a sense of shared purpose among people of many ages and skill sets? By listening and learning -- and addressing the possibility of failure.

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Touch of Nature

  A brief introduction to minerals What Is a Mineral?   Amethyst crystals from Brazil Click on image for full size Courtesy of Corel Photography Related links: Check out some common silicate minerals! Did Life First Form in a Mica Sandwich at the Bottom of an Ancient Sea? Listen to a podcast about early life on Earth and the mineral mica Newly-Found Rock May Prove Antarctica and North America Were Connected Minerals are the building blocks of rocks. They are non-living, solid, and, like all matter, are made of atoms ofelements. There are manydifferent types of minerals and each type is made of particular groups of atoms. The atoms are arranged in a network called a crystal lattice. The lattice of atoms is what gives a mineral its crystal shape.

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Ancient clues by May Ram

Juan Enriquez: Will our kids be a different species? Throughout human evolution, multiple versions of humans co-existed. Could we be mid-upgrade now? At TEDxSummit, Juan Enriquez sweeps across time and space to bring us to the present moment -- and shows how technology is revealing evidence that suggests rapid evolution may be under way.

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Talks that give me hope!

Bill Gates: Innovating to zero! At TED2010, Bill Gates unveils his vision for the world's energy future, describing the need for "miracles" to avoid planetary catastrophe and explaining why he's backing a dramatically different type of nuclear reactor. The necessary goal? Zero carbon emissions globally by 2050. About Bill Gates

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The road to peace

Jeremy Gilley: One day of peace Here's a crazy idea: Persuade the world to try living in peace for just one day, every September 21. In this energetic, honest talk, Jeremy Gilley tells the story of how this crazy idea became real -- real enough to help millions of kids in war-torn regions. About Jeremy Gilley

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Inner Peace by May Ram

The First 3 Secrets to Boosting Your Creativity I have professed to be the ultimate left-brained nerd. For years I saw myself as the analytical automaton, sorely lacking in creativity. And creativity is something that I really valued. Think about it - being creative is defined as"having or showing imagination and artistic or intellectual inventiveness.”Who wouldn’t want that quality?

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The Colors of Nature:

Armadillo Lizard - Popular Dragon Pet The Armadillo Lizard (Cordylus cataphractus) is a spiny-tailed lizard endemic to desert areas of southern Africa. It is also known as the "Typical Gridled Lizard", Armadillo Girdled Lizard or the Armadillo Spiny-tailed Lizard. They can be a light brown to dark brown in coloration depending on the subspecies, and are sometimes referred to with the common name of golden armadillo lizard. The underbelly is yellow w

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All kinds of minds

Joshua Walters: On being just crazy enough At TED's Full Spectrum Auditions, comedian Joshua Walters, who's bipolar, walks the line between mental illness and mental "skillness." In this funny, thought-provoking talk, he asks: What's the right balance between medicating craziness away and riding the manic edge of creativity and drive? About Joshua Walters

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The pursuit of justice

In this moving yet pragmatic talk, Kevin Bales explains the business of modern slavery, a multibillion-dollar economy that underpins some of the worst industries on earth. He shares stats and personal stories from his on-the-ground research -- and names the price of freeing every slave on earth right now. About Kevin Bales

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In the Mood for Love

In a humorous talk with an urgent message, LZ Granderson points out the absurdity in the idea that there's a "gay lifestyle," much less a "gay agenda." (Filmed at TEDxGrandRapids.) About LZ Granderson

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Can you believe your eyes?

Like your uncle at a family party, the rumpled Swedish doctor Lennart Green says, "Pick a card, any card." But what he does with those cards is pure magic — flabbergasting, lightning-fast, how-does-he-do-it? magic.

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Save the World and it's Creatures

Mycologist Paul Stamets lists 6 ways the mycelium fungus can help save the universe: cleaning polluted soil, making insecticides, treating smallpox and even flu .

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Child Psychology

Would you know how to spot codependency in children?

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How does my brain work? (9 talks)

Could future devices read images from our brains? Posted Mar 2014 As an expert on cutting-edge digital displays, Mary Lou Jepsen studies how to show our most creative ideas on screens. And as a brain surgery patient herself, she is driven to know more about the neural activity that underlies invention, creativity, thought. She meshes these two passions in a rather mind-blowing talk on two cutting-edge brain studies that might point to a new frontier in understanding how (and what) we think.

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Why ancient Greeks are always Nude?

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Why ancient Greeks are always Nude? by May Ram

Why ancient Greeks are always Nude?

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Live Science by May Ram

Deadly Blood Type Solves 60-Year-Old Medical Mystery by Charles Q. Choi, Live Science Contributor People with the rare Vel-negative blood type can die if they receive a Vel-positive transfusion, and now scientists know why. Credit: Nicolle Rager Fuller, National Science Foundation View full size image A blood type that can turn blood transfusions deadly has proven a perplexing mystery for 60 years. Now researchers have finally identified the secret behind the blood type known as "Vel," findings that could help make blood safer for hundreds of thousands of people worldwide.

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Amazing Technology by May Ram

Amazing Technology Tel Aviv Artist Eyal Gever recreated natural disasters with 3D Printing     Jan.27, 2012 Israel programmer and 3D sculpture artist Eyal Gever recreated scenarios such as tsunamis hitting houses, bus crashes and oil spills, using his self-programed 3D animation software and 3D printing technology in his Tel Aviv studio. (video below: Eyal Gever explains his work method at his Tel Aviv studio)

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To boldly go

My trek to the South Pole Extreme runner Ray Zahab shares an enthusiastic account of his record-breaking trek on foot to the South Pole — a 33-day sprint through the snow.

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Daily Post:

  Ebola: The Most Dangerous Virus   from Paper News TV   Over 1200 people have died so far in West Africas Ebola outbreak, which Doctors Without Borders (also known as MSF) is calling "unprecedented." And the deadly disease, reports indicate, is continuing to spread.    Ebola is a frightening disease: It is one of the worlds most lethal viruses, and the CDC ranks it among anthrax and smallpox as a Category A bioterrorism agent. As some have pointed out, however, other diseases are taking a much bigger toll in the developing world. Ebola has killed about 3,000  people in total since it was first documented in 1976. But the dramatic nature of Ebola aside, health workers say there are a number of reasons to believe this latest outbreak is particularly concerning: It is widespread. The outbreak began in Guinea six months ago, and has since crossed international borders to Sierra Leone and Liberia, where it is so far killed seven people. Now, Mali, another neighboring country, is reporting its first suspected cases as well. Because Ebola is not airborne — it can only be transmitted through direct contact with the blood or body secretions of someone who is infected — containing it is theoretically simple: health workers need to identify all possible cases and quarantine them. The widespread distribution of the outbreak complicates this, as does the fact that it is being found in urban centers instead of remote, rural areas. "This is the first time Ebola is detected in Guinea, so the population and the medical staff do not know the disease," Esther Sterk, a tropical medicine adviser for Doctors Without Borders, explained to NPR. At least 200 healthcare workers are among those infected, mostly likely because, as one expert explains, "they did not know what they were dealing with." There is also a large amount of stigma and fear associated with Ebola, Laurie Garrett, a senior fellow with the Council on Foreign Relations, explained to Bloomberg News. That attitude could cause patients to seek care in hospitals far away from their local communities, further spreading the disease. "If those hospitals are not aware of what is coming," Garrett added, "they will quickly become cauldrons, and spread the virus internally." To help counteract that problem, NPR reports, anthropologists are being flown into Guinea alongside health workers to help them contain the outbreak in a "culturally sensitive and appropriate" way.   Watch The Video Documentary. The only way to protect people is to keep them from getting it in the first place. The containment issue is so important because there is no vaccine available to protect people from Ebola; there is also no available treatment or cure. Once contracted, the disease kills about 90 percent of patients.

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A Lonely Heart

One look got my attention, But love, It was just your suit.   Another look. Got my attention, But love, It was just your kindness.

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My Son's Birthday Wish Contest

My Son's surprise

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Open-source, open world (9 talks)

The currency of the new economy is trust There's been an explosion of collaborative consumption — web-powered sharing of cars, apartments, skills. Rachel Botsman explores the currency that makes systems like Airbnb and Taskrabbit work: trust, influence, and what she calls "reputation capital."

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How Children Think

Conclusion Because young children are emerging moral thinkers constrained by their cognitive characteristics, the early childhood curriculum should provide opportunities for children to deal with moral issues and think about right and wrong in developmentally appropriate ways. Preschool teachers can promote children’s moral development by dealing with issues of fairness, justice, human rights, and caring. In addition, the teacher who understands normal moral development will be aware of the reasons young children sometimes appear to be selfish and will recognize opportunities to promote the development of moral thinking in ways that match the child’s cognitive level of functioning. New View Of The Way Young Children Think For parents who have found themselves repeating the same warnings or directions to their toddler over and over to no avail, new research from the University of Colorado at Boulder offers them an answer as to why their toddlers don't listen to their advice: they're just storing it away for later. Scientists -- and many parents -- have long believed that children's brains operate like those of little adults. The thinking was that over time kids learn things like proactively planning for and understanding how actions in the present affect them in the future. But the new study suggests that this is not the case.  "The good news is what we're saying to our kids doesn't go in one ear and out the other, like people might have thought," said CU-Boulder psychology Professor Yuko Munakata, who conducted the study with CU doctoral student Christopher Chatham and Michael Frank of Brown University. "It also doesn't go in and then get put into action like it does with adults. But rather it goes in and gets stored away for later." "I went into this study expecting a completely different set of findings," said Munakata. "There is a lot of work in the field of cognitive development that focuses on how kids are basically little versions of adults trying to do the same things adults do, but they're just not as good at it yet. What we show here is they are doing something completely different." During the study, the CU-Boulder researchers used a computer game designed for children, and a technique known as pupillometry -- a process that measures the diameter of the pupil of the eye to determine the mental effort of the child -- to study the cognitive abilities of 3- and-a-half-year-olds and 8-year-olds. The computer game involved teaching children simple rules about two cartoon characters -- Blue from Blue's Clues and SpongeBob Squarepants -- and their preferences for different objects. In the directions for the game, children were told that Blue likes watermelon, so they were to press the happy face on the computer screen only when they saw Blue followed by a watermelon. When SpongeBob appeared, they were told to press the sad face on the screen. "The older kids found this sequence easy, because they can anticipate the answer before the object appears," Chatham said. "But preschoolers fail to anticipate in this way. Instead, they slow down and exert mental effort after being presented with the watermelon, as if they're thinking back to the character they had seen only after the fact." Using pupillometry to determine the time at which children exerted mental effort, the speed of their responses for each type of sequence and the relative accuracy of those responses, the researchers found that children neither plan for the future nor live completely in the present. Instead, they call up the past as they need it. "For example, let's say it's cold outside and you tell your 3-year-old to go get his jacket out of his bedroom and get ready to go outside. You might expect the child to plan for the future, think 'OK it's cold outside so the jacket will keep me warm,' " said Chatham. "But what we suggest is that this isn't what goes on in a 3-year-old's brain. Rather, they run outside, discover that it is cold, and then retrieve the memory of where their jacket is, and then they go get it." Munakata doesn't claim to be a parental expert, but she does think their new study has relevance to parents' daily interactions with their toddlers. "If you just repeat something again and again that requires your young child to prepare for something in advance, that is not likely to be effective," Munakata said. "What would be more effective would be to somehow try to trigger this reactive function. So don't do something that requires them to plan ahead in their mind, but rather try to highlight the conflict that they are going to face. Perhaps you could say something like 'I know you don't want to take your coat now, but when you're standing in the yard shivering later, remember that you can get your coat from your bedroom." Munakata said the findings have broader implications for research in the field of cognitive development. "Further study could help people figure out why kids are doing poorly or well in different educational settings," she said.   

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Choose To Be Happy by May Ram

Positive Thinking in Suggested Self-Talk    Fear is probably the single-most thing in our lives that hold us back from success. When you have fear dwindling beneath the surface of our mind, often it encourages doubt. Doubt usually encourages low-self esteem, confidence, which all holds a person back from successfully gaining in life.   

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The Mystery Box

Life lessons through Tinkering Gever Tulley uses engaging photos and footage to demonstrate the valuable lessons kids learn at his Tinkering School. When given tools, materials and guidance, these young imaginations run wild and creative problem-solving takes over to build unique boats, bridges and even a roller coaster!

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Facts and Myths About Poisonous Mushrooms

Myths: Never Rely on These for Poisonous Mushroom Identification   Another cause of poisoning is relying on myths to help identify poisonous mushrooms. This strategy is dangerous, as many of these myths are inaccurate and have no scientific basis. To help avoid sickness (or worse!) never use a folk tale when making a classification. Instead use local knowledge gained from books and forays with experts.

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Human Nature by May Ram

Mental Health for All by Involving All Nearly 450 million people are affected by mental illness worldwide. In wealthy nations, just half receive appropriate care, but in developing countries, close to 90 percent go untreated because psychiatrists are in such short supply. Vikram Patel outlines a highly promising approach — training members of communities to give mental health interventions, empowering ordinary people to care for others. Vikram Patel helps bring better mental health care to low-resource communities — by teaching ordinary people to deliver basic psychiatric services. Why you should listen

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Sins Of a Homeless Heart 3

Calmness The day is hot, hotter in my head, by deadly attack of greedy minds.

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Empowering Your Child

An Unnourished Child has A Long Road Ahead Synopsis   Most parents strive hard to provide the best for their children, sometimes though it is not an easy task. However, almost all parents would willingly sacrifice for their children.            Important Info   From a mental point of view an unnourished child will lack the basic interaction between parent and child, thus causing the child to be ill equipped to face the interaction with the others.    Children who are mentally unnourished will also be unable to fend for themselves in an environment other than the one they are used to. Being able to hold a conversation and attention of those around would be rather difficult.   Being spiritually deprived or unnourished has equally if not more devastating effects. In the current world of very advanced technology most children have lost the ability to feel and be in touch with others and with themselves.    There is no quiet time spent in prayer or simply just sitting back and enjoying nature. Children are constantly being pushed to be better and thus in their quest to achieve this they have lost sight of the more important things in life.             Wrapping Up   Being spiritually, mentally and physically unnourished could have far reaching effects in the child life which will be carried through to adulthood.   In terms of physical health an unnourished child will have many problems. Most noticeable would be the conditions of the skin which would most often be dry and full of uneven and scaring textures. The eyes, teeth, and hair would be dull and lack vibrancy. The breath of a young child should not be too strong and if it is this would indicate the lack of water and nutritional food. The energy levels of the child would also be below average when compared to others children of the same age group.

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How We Make Choices

Choice, happiness and spaghetti sauce "Tipping Point" author Malcolm Gladwell gets inside the food industry's pursuit of the perfect spaghetti sauce — and makes a larger argument about the nature of choice and happiness. Detective of fads and emerging subcultures, chronicler of jobs-you-never-knew-existed, Malcolm Gladwell's work is toppling the popular understanding of bias, crime, food, marketing, race, consumers and intelligence. Why you should listen Malcolm Gladwell searches for the counterintuitive in what we all take to be the mundane: cookies, sneakers, pasta sauce. A New Yorker staff writer since 1996, he visits obscure laboratories and infomercial set kitchens as often as the hangouts of freelance cool-hunters -- a sort of pop-R&D gumshoe -- and for that has become a star lecturer and bestselling author. Sparkling with curiosity, undaunted by difficult research (yet an eloquent, accessible writer), his work uncovers truths hidden in strange data. His always-delightful blogtackles topics from serial killers to steroids in sports, while provocative recent work in the New Yorker sheds new light on the Flynn effect -- the decades-spanning rise in I.Q. scores. Gladwell has written four books. The Tipping Point, which began as a New Yorker piece, applies the principles of epidemiology to crime (and sneaker sales), while Blinkexamines the unconscious processes that allow the mind to "thin slice" reality -- and make decisions in the blink of an eye. His third book, Outliers, questions the inevitabilities of success and identifies the relation of success to nature versus nurture. The newest work, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures, is an anthology of hisNew Yorker contributions.  He says: "There is more going on beneath the surface than we think, and more going on in little, finite moments of time than we would guess."

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World Cup winners list:

Germany 2006: Italy Italy's victory over France in the final was one for the memories. Not only did Italy win 5-3 on penalty kicks, but France's captain Zinedine Zidane was red-carded for head-butting Marco Materazzi in extra-time.  Italy's goalkeeper, Gianluigi Buffon won the Yashin Award given to the best goalkeeper, and was one of seven Italian players voted to the All-Star team. The victory gave Italy their fourth World Cup title, then second only to Brazil's five, but matched by Germany this year. Magical Germany 2006===> Italy world champion

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Lotus & Relaxation

Lotus Flower Meaning and Symbolisms Find out about the Meanings associated with the Lotus Flower Anybody who has ever observed a lotus flower emerging from a murky pond cannot fail to see the beauty of this exquisite plant. The flower always looks so clean and pure against the background of the dirty pond. Because of this the lotus flower has come to be associated with purity and beauty in the religions of Buddhism and Hinduism respectively; the ancient Egyptians scholars observed that in the night-time the lotus closed its flowers and sank into the water, and came up with a different association with the flower related to rebirth and the Sun; in actual fact the Lotus slowly emerges from a pond over a three day period and then blooms in the morning until mid-afternoon. It can therefore be assumed that the lotus flower meaning is different between cultures, though in fact they share many similarities. I would like to explain how some of these associations came about, and I will therefore split up this article into three main sections, based upon the three main groups, that is to say that of the ancient Egyptians, the Buddhists, and Hinduism. Meaning of the Lotus Flower to the Ancient Egyptians Anybody who has taken a look at Egyptian culture cannot fail to have noticed the significance of the meaning of the Lotus flower in their culture. In ancient Egypt there were two main types of lotus that grew, the white, and the blue (scientifically a waterlily, but symbolically a lotus). Further to this another type, the pink lotus flower was introduced into Egypt sometime during the late period of their civilization. If one is to observe the many hieroglyphics, it is easy to see that the blue Lotus flower is the most commonly portrayed.   This Egyptian artwork shows the Priest Nebsini holding a blue lotus flower As mentioned in the introduction above about the meanings of the lotus flower, this plant is known to be associated with rebirth. This is a consequence of it supposedly retracting into the water at the night, and emerging a fresh in the Sun the next day (see the introduction for how a lotus plant actually comes into bloom). The Egyptians therefore associated the lotus flower with the sun which also disappeared in the night, only to re-emerge in the morning. Therefore the lotus came to symbolize the Sun and the creation. In many hieroglyphics works the lotus is depicted as emerging from Nun (the primordial water) bearing the Sun God. As something that is associated with rebirth, it is no surprise that the lotus flower is also associated with death, and the famous Egyptian book of the dead is known to include spells that are able to transform a person into a lotus, thus allowing for resurrection. Another interesting fact about the lotus flower meaning to the Egyptians was the way that it was used as a symbol for the unification of the two Egyptian kingdoms, that is to say the bonding of upper and lower Egypt. For a long time the lotus had been used in the hieroglyphics and art of upper Egypt, whereas in lower  Egypt the Papyrus plant was notably in abundance. Therefore pictures of lotus and Papyrus that had grown up together and become inter-wound with each other came to be a symbol of the bringing together of the two kingdoms. Lotus Flower Meaning in Buddhism In Buddhism the lotus is known to be associated with purity, spiritual awakening and faithfulness. The flower is considered pure as it is able to emerge from murky waters in the morning and be perfectly clean. Therefore in common with Egyptian mythology the lotus is seen as a sign of rebirth, but additionally it is associated with purity. The breaking of the surface every morning is also suggestive of desire, this leads to it being associated with spiritual enlightenment.   Buddha atop a Lotus Flower. As Buddhism stems from a different part of the world to Egyptology, there are many more colors of lotus to be seen. So it is not too surprising that the many different colors have come to be associated with  different aspects of Buddhism. The main symbolism of the lotus flower and their meanings are given here. Blue Lotus: The blue lotus flower is associated with a victory of the spirit over that of wisdom, intelligence and knowledge. If you get to see it a blue Lotus in Buddhist art you will notice that it is always depicted as being partially open and the centre is never observed. White lotus flower: this color lotus is known to symbolize Bodhi (being awakened), and represents a state of mental purity, and that of spiritual perfection; it is also associated with the pacification of one’s nature. This lotus is considered to be the womb of the world. Purple Lotus: known to be Mystic and is associated with esoteric sects. It can be shown depicted as either an open flower or as a bud. The eight petals of the purple Lotus are representative of the noble eightfold path; one of the principal teachings of the Buddha. Following this path is thought to lead to self awakening, and is considered one of the noble truths. Pink lotus flower: this is the supreme lotus and is considered to be the true lotus of Buddha. Red lotus: this is related to the heart, and the Lotus flower meaning is associated with that of love and compassion. The Lotus Flower and its Meaning in Hinduism Perhaps one of the strongest associations of the lotus flower with religion is that that is observed in Hinduism. In this religion the lotus flower meaning is associated with beauty, fertility, prosperity, spirituality, and eternity. The most common lotus form seen in Hinduism is the white lotus flower.   The beautiful white lotus flower has special significance in Hinduism, where its meaning is strongly associated with Laxmi and Brahma. Image by Matze_ott. Many of the gods and goddesses of Hinduism are linked to the flower, for example the goddess of prosperity, Laxmi, is usually depicted as being seated atop a fully opened lotus flower. Likewise Brahma, the god of creation is depicted as emerging from a lotus that crawls from the Naval of the sustainer Lord Vishnu. As a lotus is able to emerge from Muddy Waters un-spoilt and pure it is considered to represent a wise and spiritually enlightened quality in a person; it is representative of somebody who carries out their tasks with little concern for any reward and with a full liberation from attachment. It is very interesting how the open flower and the unopened Lotus bud forms are associated with human traits. The unopened bud is representative of a folded soul that has the ability to unfold and open itself up to the divine truth. It is hoped that you now have a better understanding of the lotus flower meaning across the three major cultures in which it is known to play (or have played) a major role. It is no wonder that these civilizations, have found wonderment in such a beautiful flower.

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Happiness By May Ram

How to buy happiness At TEDxCambridge, Michael Norton shares fascinating research on how money can, indeed buy happiness — when you don't spend it on yourself. Listen for surprising data on the many ways pro-social spending can benefit you, your work, and (of course) other people. Through clever studies, Michael Norton studies how we feel about what we buy and spend.

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Origins of Self-Defeating Behaviors

Case Study 3:   John is a student at one of the State Schools in the East Coast and moved to L.A. in his third semester in College. Though quite a well-known and well-liked guy in the East Coast he encountered many problems when trying to socialize with people from L.A.  John is really insecure about what people think about him, he even has a hard time relating to his current roommate who characterizes John as someone who is quite shy. John doesn’t try to talk to anyone in his dorm, even his roommate. He spends most of his time on his computer or watching TV. The people in his dorm being generally a friendly bunch often engage him in small talk. John though wanting to engage in a conversation suddenly becomes nervous and come off rude due to his abrupt responses to questions. The result is quite opposite to what she wants to happen, his classmates start to distance themselves from John as they feel John is not interested in socializing with them. So over the course of the 4th semester they no longer interacted with John.  John started exhibiting SBD about 5 months after moving to LA. He started arriving to class late or just in time in order to avoid having to socialize with the rest of the students. John now spends most of his time just reading and playing with his computer.  So John wanted to take a big long look at the origin of why he is having a problem adjusting socially to LA.  Though relatively well adjusted he did remember having a hard time reading back in 2nd grade, which resulted in hi having to take extra time with a tutor. During the reading time John was tormented by two bullies who mocked his slow and stilting ability to read.   John was very angry at first but as time went by the anger turned inward. John started expecting to fail and because of that expectation started to fail in class. Towards the end of the year during a regular check up by the optometrist it was discovered that there was a problem with John’s eyes that was easily correctable by a pair of glasses. After getting the glasses John stopped having problems with reading as it turns out that was the root cause of the problems.  Suddenly John started excelling in reading and in academics in general. People’s perception of him changed from that of negative to a quite positive outlook. The problem was that John’s self esteem had not improved along with the other aspects of his life. John still felt insecure and did not accept compliments from others. As John continued to excel he never felt that he was good enough and he always felt he did not deserve any of the praise that he was given. Even though John was excelling academically he had very few friends and people noticed that he would often berate himself if he got less than perfect scores on exams.  In college John got an 87% on a Biology Exam, the thing was that he had expected a much higher grade but had not seen that there were more questions on the back. While not quite the best in class this was still a very respectable score. John was so upset that when he got home he did not speak to anyone, even his roommate. This had two effects; it gave the roommate a negative impression of John and also deprived John of anyone to speak with.  Luckily the school that John went to provided social and psychological counseling and John decided to avail of it. The main thing that the therapist did for John was allow him to challenge his main core belief. His belief that he was inadequate and did not have what it takes to succeed. John being a bright guy decided that he would try his best to apply this advice. John actively started trying to be more social and went out of his way to talk and meet people.  John started reacting differently to problems; he started seeking out people instead of shutting things in. However John still had problems when it came to dating girls. Insecurity starts kicking in whenever he is around people that he might feel uncomfortable with. When one of the cute girls in class start taking an interest in John his first reaction is to push the person away. However, he remembered what the therapist said; you need to challenge your core belief. As time went by John was better able to address the people and eventually even got a girlfriend. Though this didn’t mean that suddenly John was an outgoing socialite it did start the road to transformation.  John continues to suffer from self-defeating behavior. The difference now was that he was able to identify what it is and how to start improving and fixing your problems. John represents a remarkable people out there who need help with this. People might need a therapist like John did but not having one around cannot stop you from having an excellent results. 

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Mantras

Om Sat Chit Ananda Parabrahma Purashothama Paramatma Sri Bhagavathi Sametha Sri Bhagavathe Namaha This mantra evokes the living God, asking protection and freedom from all sorrow and suffering. It is a prayer that adores the great creator and liberator, who out of love and compassion manifests, to protect us, in an earthly form. This Moolamantra has given great peace and joy to people all over the world, who have chanted, or even listened to it. It has the power to transport ones mind to the state of causeless love and limitless joy. The calmness that the mantra can give is to be experienced, not spoken about. Dear reader, here is the key with which any door to spiritual treasure could be opened. A tool which can be used to achieve all desires. A medicine which cures all ills. The nectar that can set man free!  All auspiciousness and serenity is yours simply by chanting or listening to this magnificent Moolamantra. Whenever you chant the Moolamantra even without knowing the meaning of it, that itself carries power. But when you know the meaning and chant with that feeling in your heart then the energy would flow million times more powerful. Therefore it is essential to know the meaning of the Mantra when you use it. The Mantra is like calling a name. Just like when you call a person he comes and makes you feel his presence, the same manner when you chant this mantra, the supreme energy manifests everywhere around you. As the Universe is Omnipresent, the supreme energy can manifest anywhere and any time. It is also very important to know that the invocation with all humility, respect and with great necessity makes the presence stronger.

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Opportunities for Hackers

Russian Hackers Hit 420,000 Websites: Report Russian hackers have stolen 1.2 billion user names and passwords in a series of Internet heists affecting 420,000 websites, according to a report published Tuesday.  The thievery was described in a New York Times story based on the findings ofHold Security, a Milwaukee firm that has a history of uncovering online security breaches.  The identities of the websites that were broken into weren't identified by The Times, which cited nondisclosure agreements that required Hold Security to keep some information confidential.  The reported break-ins are the latest incidents to raise doubts about the security measures that both big and small companies use to protect people's information online. Security experts believe those hackers will continue breaking into computer networks unless companies become more vigilant.  Keep up with your favorite celebs in the pages of PEOPLE Magazine by subscribing now. "Companies that rely on usernames and passwords have to develop a sense of urgency about changing this," Avivah Litan, a security analyst at the research firm Gartner told The Times.  Alex Holden, the founder and chief information security officer of Hold Security, told the newspaper that most of the sites hit by the Russian hackers are still vulnerable to further break-ins. Besides filching 1.2 billion online passwords, the hackers also have amassed 500 million email addresses that could help them engineer other crimes.  So far, little of the information stolen in the wave of attacks appears to have been sold to other online crooks, according to The Times. Instead, the information is being used to send marketing pitches, schemes and other junk messages on social networks like Twitter.  The breadth of these break-ins should serve as a chilling reminder of the skullduggery that has been going undetected on the Internet for years, one Internet security CEO said. "This issue reminds me of an iceberg, where 90 percent of it is actually underwater," said John Prisco, CEO of another security firm, Triumfant, in a statement.  Here's what you can do to keep your online accounts safe and your passwords strong:  • Make your password long. The recommended minimum is eight characters, but 14 is better and 25 is even better than that.  • Use combinations of letters and numbers, upper and lower case and symbols such as the exclamation mark. "PaSsWoRd!43" is far better than "password43."  • Avoid words that are in dictionaries, even if you add numbers and symbols. There are programs that can crack passwords by going through databases of known words. One trick is to add numbers in the middle of a word – as in "pas123swor456d" instead of "password123456."  • Substitute characters. For instance, use the number zero instead of the letter O, or replace the S with a dollar sign.  • Avoid easy-to-guess words, even if they aren't in the dictionary. You shouldn't use your name, company name or hometown. Avoid pets' and relatives' names and things that can be looked up, such as your birthday or ZIP code.  • Never reuse passwords on other accounts. 

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Behold, a Blue Strawberry?

Behold, a Blue Strawberry?   According to some convincing sources, a blue strawberry does exist! Yay or nay? On the one hand it looks awesome, that atomic blue color is quite a novelty and is extremely attractive. But at the same time, would you feel safe eating it?  After all, it is a Willy Wonka-esque creation. This blue was purely unintentional as scientists wanted to figure out a way to protect strawberries from frost and found that a gene in “Artic Flounder Fish” produced antifreeze properties to protect itself from freezing waters. The result of genetically modifying this gene created a shockingly blue fruit that can withstand very cold temperatures and won’t turn into mush in your freezers. Cynthia Blu Jawdeh uses a few different references to support the existence of the Blue Strawberry. On the other hand, there have been several other ‘Photoshop enthusiasts’ who have called out some of the inconsistencies in the featured image, and some of the choppiness around the border. What are your thoughts? Would you eat one if it existed? Is the possibility of a Blue Strawberry that outstanding that you’d be hard-pressed to believe it exists? Speak on it in the comments!

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Curiosity by May Ram

I didn't know! Whitney Houston's resting place under armed-guard watch as grave robbers target £300,000 jewels singer was buried with... Armed security guards have been placed at Whitney Houston's grave to prevent grave robbers from plundering £300,000 worth of jewels and clothing the singer was buried in. Round-the-clock guards are protecting the plot at the Fairview Cemetery in New Jersey, despite the area being closed to the general public earlier this week. A source told the Daily Star: 'There is a very genuine fear that her coffin will be targeted by grave robbers.

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Memories in July 2014

  Rainbow Heart_1 (English Subtitle) The hard life in Burma. Click here for the second part!

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Science & Technology Today

December 27, 2004 --The Day Planet Earth Survived Its Greatest Space-Ray Attack               It came suddenly from the distant reaches of the Constellation Sagittarius, some 50,000 light years away.

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Depression in Older Adults & the Elderly

Depression in the elderly without sadness While depression and sadness might seem to go hand and hand, many depressed seniors claim not to feel sad at all. They may complain, instead, of low motivation, a lack of energy, or physical problems. In fact, physical complaints, such as arthritis pain or worsening headaches, are often the predominant symptom of depression in the elderly. Depression clues in older adults Older adults who deny feeling sad or depressed may still have major depression. Here are the clues to look for: Unexplained or aggravated aches and pains Feelings of hopelessness or helplessness Anxiety and worries Memory problems Lack of motivation and energy Slowed movement and speech Irritability Loss of interest in socializing and hobbies Neglecting personal care (skipping meals, forgetting meds, neglecting personal hygiene) To be continue...

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Beautiful World by May Ram

10 Incredibly Beautiful Fishes GHOSTSHIP AUGUST 9, 2008 As an avid aquarist and ichthyologist, I have been fascinated by fish for quite some time now. I thought I’d share some of the more beautiful species that I know. These are in no particular order, since beauty is, of course, in the eye of the beholder. 10   African Cichlids First off, cichlids is pronounced “Sick-Lids”. African Cichlids are fish found in Three lakes in Africa; Malawi, Tanganyika and Victoria. The Victorian Species are less numerous and usually less colorful than the others. These fish usually grow to about six or seven inches long, with the exception of the Frontosoa Species, which grow to about twelve to fourteen inches in length. Fortunately, these fish are freshwater, and easy to raise in a home aquarium, the only requirement being that they have water with a higher pH level and plenty of hiding spots (they can be quite aggressive!). There are also species of Cichlids that live in the Amazon Basin, but these get much larger and are much more aggressive than their African relatives.

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Math in Daily Life

  3D Shapes Pyramids A pyramid is a polyhedron for which the base is a polygon and all lateral faces are triangles. In this lesson, we'll only concern ourselves with pyramids whose lateral faces are congruent — that is, they're the same size and shape.

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Mysterious Things by May Ram

The 9 Deadliest Minerals We've Ever Mined Andrew Tarantola ProfileFollow Andrew Tarantola 1 Precious minerals make the modern world go 'round—they're used in everything from circuit boards to tableware. They're also some of the most toxic materials known to science, and excavating them has proved so dangerous over the years, some have been phased out of industrial production altogether. Here are the nine most toxic minerals we've ever mined.

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Amazing Creation By Mythospheric

The Man Behind The Name Mythospheric Is Aner Ben Shoshan Aged 32 From A Small Town In Israel Desert Called Mitzpe Ramon. Mythospheric Playing A Unique Style Pure Morning Vibes Fill With Emotional Melodies,Dreamy Atmosphere,And Psychedelic

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The Story of Mathematics

GREEK MATHEMATICS - PYTHAGORAS Pythagoras of Samos (c.570-495 BC) It is sometimes claimed that we owe pure mathematics to Pythagoras, and he is often called the first "true" mathematician. But, although his contribution was clearly important, he nevertheless remains a controversial figure. He left no mathematical writings himself, and much of what we know about Pythagorean thought comes to us from the writings of Philolaus and other later Pythagorean scholars. Indeed, it is by no means clear whether many (or indeed any) of the theorems ascribed to him were in fact solved by Pythagoras personally or by his followers. The school he established at Croton in southern Italy around 530 BC was the nucleus of a rather bizarre Pythagorean sect. Although Pythagorean thought was largely dominated by mathematics, it was also profoundly mystical, and Pythagoras imposed his quasi-religious philosophies, strict vegetarianism, communal living, secret rites and odd rules on all the members of his school (including bizarre and apparently random edicts about never urinating towards the sun, never marrying a woman who wears gold jewellery, never passing an ass lying in the street, never eating or even touching black fava beans, etc) . The members were divided into the "mathematikoi" (or "learners"), who extended and developed the more mathematical and scientific work that Pythagoras himself began, and the "akousmatikoi" (or "listeners"), who focused on the more religious and ritualistic aspects of his teachings. There was always a certain amount of friction between the two groups and eventually the sect became caught up in some fierce local fighting and ultimately dispersed. Resentment built up against the secrecy and exclusiveness of the Pythagoreans and, in 460 BC, all their meeting places were burned and destroyed, with at least 50 members killed in Croton alone. The over-riding dictum of Pythagoras's school was “All is number” or “God is number”, and the Pythagoreans effectively practised a kind of numerology or number-worship, and considered each number to have its own character and meaning. For example, the number one was the generator of all numbers; two represented opinion; three, harmony; four, justice; five, marriage; six, creation; seven, the seven planets or “wandering stars”; etc. Odd numbers were thought of as female and even numbers as male. The Pythagorean Tetractys The holiest number of all was "tetractys" or ten, a triangular number composed of the sum of one, two, three and four. It is a great tribute to the Pythagoreans' intellectual achievements that they deduced the special place of the number 10 from an abstract mathematical argument rather than from something as mundane as counting the fingers on two hands. However, Pythagoras and his school - as well as a handful of other mathematicians of ancient Greece - was largely responsible for introducing a more rigorous mathematics than what had gone before, building from first principles using axioms and logic. Before Pythagoras, for example, geometry had been merely a collection of rules derived by empirical measurement. Pythagoras discovered that a complete system of mathematics could be constructed, where geometric elements corresponded with numbers, and where integers and their ratios were all that was necessary to establish an entire system of logic and truth. He is mainly remembered for what has become known as Pythagoras’ Theorem (or the Pythagorean Theorem): that, for any right-angled triangle, the square of the length of the hypotenuse (the longest side, opposite the right angle) is equal to the sum of the square of the other two sides (or “legs”). Written as an equation: a2+ b2 = c2. What Pythagoras and his followers did not realize is that this also works for any shape: thus, the area of a pentagon on the hypotenuse is equal to the sum of the pentagons on the other two sides, as it does for a semi-circle or any other regular (or even irregular( shape. Pythagoras' (Pythagorean) Theorem The simplest and most commonly quoted example of a Pythagorean triangle is one with sides of 3, 4 and 5 units (32 + 42 = 52, as can be seen by drawing a grid of unit squares on each side as in the diagram at right), but there are a potentially infinite number of other integer “Pythagorean triples”, starting with (5, 12 13), (6, 8, 10), (7, 24, 25), (8, 15, 17), (9, 40, 41), etc. It should be noted, however that (6, 8, 10) is not what is known as a “primitive” Pythagorean triple, because it is just a multiple of (3, 4, 5). Pythagoras’ Theorem and the properties of right-angled triangles seems to be the most ancient and widespread mathematical development after basic arithmetic and geometry, and it was touched on in some of the most ancient mathematical texts fromBabylon and Egypt, dating from over a thousand years earlier. One of the simplest proofs comes from ancient China, and probably dates from well before Pythagoras' birth. It was Pythagoras, though, who gave the theorem its definitive form, although it is not clear whether Pythagoras himself definitively proved it or merely described it. Either way, it has become one of the best-known of all mathematical theorems, and as many as 400 different proofs now exist, some geometrical, some algebraic, some involving advanced differential equations, etc. It soom became apparent, though, that non-integer solutions were also possible, so that an isosceles triangle with sides 1, 1 and √2, for example, also has a right angle, as the Babylonians had discovered centuries earlier. However, when Pythagoras’s student Hippasus tried to calculate the value of √2, he found that it was not possible to express it as a fraction, thereby indicating the potential existence of a whole new world of numbers, the irrational numbers (numbers that can not be expressed as simple fractions of integers). This discovery rather shattered the elegant mathematical world built up by Pythagoras and his followers, and the existence of a number that could not be expressed as the ratio of two of God's creations (which is how they thought of the integers) jeopardized the cult's entire belief system. Poor Hippasus was apparently drowned by the secretive Pythagoreans for broadcasting this important discovery to the outside world. But the replacement of the idea of the divinity of the integers by the richer concept of the continuum, was an essential development in mathematics. It marked the real birth of Greek geometry, which deals with lines and planes and angles, all of which are continuous and not discrete. Among his other achievements in geometry, Pythagoras (or at least his followers, the Pythagoreans) also realized that the sum of the angles of a triangle is equal to two right angles (180°), and probably also the generalization which states that the sum of the interior angles of a polygon with n sides is equal to (2n - 4) right angles, and that the sum of its exterior angles equals 4 right angles. They were able to construct figures of a given area, and to use simple geometrical algebra, for example to solve equations such as a(a - x) = x2 by geometrical means. The Pythagoreans also established the foundations of number theory, with their investigations of triangular, square and also perfect numbers (numbers that are the sum of their divisors). They discovered several new properties of square numbers, such as that the square of a number n is equal to the sum of the first n odd numbers (e.g. 42 = 16 = 1 + 3 + 5 + 7). They also discovered at least the first pair of amicable numbers, 220 and 284 (amicable numbers are pairs of numbers for which the sum of the divisors of one number equals the other number, e.g. the proper divisors of 220 are 1, 2, 4, 5, 10, 11, 20, 22, 44, 55 and 110, of which the sum is 284; and the proper divisors of 284 are 1, 2, 4, 71, and 142, of which the sum is 220). Pythagoras is credited with the discovery of the ratios between harmonious musical tones Pythagoras is also credited with the discovery that the intervals between harmonious musical notes always have whole number ratios. For instance, playing half a length of a guitar string gives the same note as the open string, but an octave higher; a third of a length gives a different but harmonious note; etc. Non-whole number ratios, on the other hand, tend to give dissonant sounds. In this way, Pythagoras described the first four overtones which create the common intervals which have become the primary building blocks of musical harmony: the octave (1:1), the perfect fifth (3:2), the perfect fourth (4:3) and the major third (5:4). The oldest way of tuning the 12-note chromatic scale is known as Pythagorean tuning, and it is based on a stack of perfect fifths, each tuned in the ratio 3:2. The mystical Pythagoras was so excited by this discovery that he became convinced that the whole universe was based on numbers, and that the planets and stars moved according to mathematical equations, which corresponded to musical notes, and thus produced a kind of symphony, the “Musical Universalis” or “Music of the Spheres”.

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Silver & Gold

Based on the British Empire, the Queens of England, the Duke of Wellington, toy soldiers and punk princesses, this fashion fairy tale is dominated by an ancient tulle-wrapped tree referencing the work of the artist, Christo. For the first half of the show our heroine is dressed in beautiful rags: nipped waisted jackets, Victorian-line dresses with S-bend corseted tops, textured, hand-knitted mohair and washed tweeds all in dark or neutral colours lend a make-do-and-mend feel to the proceedings. It isn't long, though, before our Princess meets her Prince Charming, at which point she descends from her treetop habitat and finds all the riches of the world at her disposal. Her clothing duly explodes into colour and references everything from the wardrobe of the young Princess Elizabeth --crimson velvet New Look dresses, ermine wraps and a bastardised Union Jack print - to the palaces of the Maharajas -- a draped, predominantly empire-line silhouette finished with paper-flat embroidered slippers, each pair bespoke and created to complement its own outfit.

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Makeup by May Ram

The power of red lipstick Written by Jessica B Matlin, Psychologies magazine

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Who are the hackers?

How to fool a GPS Todd Humphreys forecasts the near-future of geolocation when millimeter-accurate GPS "dots" will enable you to find pin-point locations, index-search your physical possessions ... or to track people without their knowledge. And the response to the sinister side of this technology may have unintended consequences of its own.  Todd Humphreys studies GPS, its future, and how we can address some of its biggest security problems. Why you should listen Todd Humphreys is director of the University of Texas at Austin's Radionavigation Laboratory -- where he works as an assistant professor in the Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. His research into orbital mechanics has made him one of the world's leading experts on GPS technology and the security concerns that arise from its ubiquitous use.  In 2008 he co-founded Coherent Navigation, a startup dedicated to creating more secure GPS systems.

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Our digital lives

Get ready for hybrid thinking Two hundred million years ago, our mammal ancestors developed a new brain feature: the neocortex. This stamp-sized piece of tissue (wrapped around a brain the size of a walnut) is the key to what humanity has become. Now, futurist Ray Kurzweil suggests, we should get ready for the next big leap in brain power, as we tap into the computing power in the cloud. Ray Kurzweil is an engineer who has radically advanced the fields of speech, text and audio technology. He's revered for his dizzying — yet convincing — writing on the advance of technology, the limits of biology and the future of the human species. Why you should listen Inventor, entrepreneur, visionary, Ray Kurzweil's accomplishments read as a startling series of firsts -- a litany of technological breakthroughs we've come to take for granted. Kurzweil invented the first optical character recognition (OCR) software for transforming the written word into data, the first print-to-speech software for the blind, the first text-to-speech synthesizer, and the first music synthesizer capable of recreating the grand piano and other orchestral instruments, and the first commercially marketed large-vocabulary speech recognition. Yet his impact as a futurist and philosopher is no less significant. In his best-selling books, which include How to Create a Mind, The Age of Spiritual Machines, The Singularity Is Near: When Humans Transcend Biology,Kurzweil depicts in detail a portrait of the human condition over the next few decades, as accelerating technologies forever blur the line between human and machine. In 2009, he unveiled Singularity University, an institution that aims to "assemble, educate and inspire leaders who strive to understand and facilitate the development of exponentially advancing technologies." He is a Director of Engineering at Google, where he heads up a team developing machine intelligence and natural language comprehension. What others say “Kurzweil's eclectic career and propensity for combining science with practical -- often humanitarian -- applications have inspired comparisons with Thomas Edison.” — Time Ray 

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Aura by May Ram

What is the Aura ? Everything in the Universe seems to be just a vibration. Every atom, every part of an atom, every electron, every elementary “particle”, even our thoughts and consciousness are just vibrations. Hence, we may define the Aura as a electro-photonic vibration response of an object to some external excitation (such as an ambient light for example). This definition is sufficient for the purpose of reading Auras, providing that we can train ourselves to see the Aura vibration. The most important property of the Aura seems to be the fact that it containsINFORMATION about the object. Aura around living (conscious) objects (people, plants ...) changes with time, sometimes very quickly. Aura around non-living object (stones, crystals, water...) is essentially fixed, but can be changed by our conscious intent. Above facts have been observed by scientists in Russia, who have been using Kirlian effect to study Auras for the last 50 years. The Aura around humans is partly composed from EM (electromagnetic) radiation, spanning from microwave, infrared (IR) to UV light. The low frequency microwave and infrared part of the spectrum (body heat) seems to be related to the low levels of the functioning of our body (DNA structure, metabolism, circulation etc.) whereas high frequency (UV part) is more related to our conscious activity such as thinking, creativity, intentions, sense of humor and emotions. Russian scientists, who seem to be about 3 decades ahead of everyone else in Aura research, make experiments suggesting that our DNA can be altered, by influencing its microwave Aura. The high frequency UV part is very important and most interesting but largely unexplored. And this part can be seen with naked eyes. AURA The Light That Heals by Andrew Kinsella

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For Our Daily Lives

5 Common Spices that Destroy Diseases  Clyde  Sustainability  1 Over the recent years we have been moving further away from the pharmaceutical industry by taking small steps, if you recollect we did an article on how to cure a child from common ailments using an extract from five leaves. But today I’ve cooked up a bunch of spices and common food ingredients that you can use to keep good health and even help and protect you from a range of diseases. It shouldn’t be surprising that some of the ingredients used in your food can even help protect you against terminal diseases. Lets start off with one of my personal favorites, Garlic. I know a 70+ year old man who has no blood pressure issues and a perfect blood sugar level that he attributes to his habit of eating three to four raw garlic cloves daily. But this is not just a figment of his imagination, take a look at what this herb has to offer, apart from bad breath that is  Garlic One of Garlic’s main benefits is that it helps reduce Cholesterol. The Linus Pauling Institute’s review of several studies found that people who consumed garlic for three months had a 6% to 11% reduction in total cholesterol. Also since garlic is an antioxidant, it may prevent the oxidation of cholesterol in the arteries. When you crush Garlic you are immediately greeted by the pungent spell, that is due to Allicin, which is responsible for its medicinal benefits. It’s said that the daily consumption of garlic can help lower heart disease risk by as much as 76 percent. It also thins the blood and hence cuts down on the chances of dangerous blood clots. Even cancer fears Allicin, especially stomach and colorectal cancer as it flushes out carcinogens even before they can damage cell DNA. If that’s not enough, Garlic has super strong antibacterial and anti-fungal properties and can help with yeast infections, some sinus infections, and common cold. Avoid processed foods, eat fresh food for every meal. Turmeric What would we do without Turmeric – we have mixed it with warm milk for cold and cough, given Turmeric and sugar (to make it edible) for kids when they bruise themselves and as a quick fix for animal injuries. Turmeric is well known to reduce inflammation, while in Indian medicine its also used to increase appetite and as a digestive aid. Turmeric gets its golden color from Curcumin. Curcumin is considered as a powerful anticancer agent and quells the inflammation that contributes to the growth of tumors. Yes, powerful lab studies suggest that Turmeric helps stop the growth and spread of cancer cells. There are numerous studies that talk about the benefits of using Turmeric against cancer and animal tests show that it even helps protect from Alzheimer’s disease. Ginger Ginger is such a powerful natural medicine that it finds itself not only in Ayurveda but also in the ancient Chinese medical texts. We have been using Ginger to treat cough and cold. It has anti-nausea properties and is a digestive aid. Ayurveda recommends eating raw ginger before meals for appetite as well as digestion. While in modern times researches have found Ginger effect in combating inflammation and even in reducing the pain and swelling in people suffering from arthritis. Apart from these benefits, ginger can help with Migraines and may even prevent and slowing the growth of cancer. It’s good for the tummy and even makes a cup of tea so delightful to have. Cinnamon: Cinnamon packs a punch when it comes to fighting diabetes, it helps control blood sugar levels and also cuts down on triglycerides and total cholesterol. Since it cuts down on the triglycerides and cholesterol its awesome for your heart and as a bonus its also rich in antioxidants. Along with a bunch of other spices, cinnamon has antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties as well. Another reason to add it into your diet is that its high in fiber and can also reduce heartburn in some people. Wow, bring on the cinnamon buns and rolls  Cloves: Who hasn’t used cloves or clove oil to stop a tooth ache? Well with the kind of teeth I have, sticking cloves in my mouth has been part of the norm thanks to its numbing effect. But I wasn’t aware that even people suffering from Arthritis can get relief from the pain as it slows down the cartilage and bone damage caused by the disease. Yet again, even cloves have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that can protect one from heart disease, stave off cancer and also appear to improve insulin function. Cloves are also known to have killed certain antibiotic resistant bacteria. I just wanted to include this informative image of the benefits of certain fruits ~ This is just a short list of herbs and spices with benefits that are still being uncovered. There are so many more that have positive effects on the human body, Basil, Coriander, Cumin, Mustard etc are all documented to boost our health and protect us from disease. Eating healthy is a choice you make three times a day, its perhaps the easiest and most efficient way to fight disease. So what will you choose to do for your next meal?

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The Creators Project

Creating the World of "Oblivion" (2013)

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Journey Back To the Past!

Journey Back To the Past! Was King George V killed by his doctor? The final years of King George V’s life were marred by illness, thanks in part to his heavy smoking. He suffered from emphysema, pleurisy, and bronchitis, and on the 15th January 1936 he took to his bed at Sandringham House, Norfolk, complaining of a cold. His condition swiftly deteriorated, and by January 20th, he was close to death. His doctor Lord Dawson issued a brief statement: “The King’s life is moving peacefully towards its close.” At 11.55pm that night, the King passed away. However, George V did not die of what might be called ‘natural causes’. The cause of death was a deliberate, fatal injection of three-quarters of a gram of morphine and one gram of cocaine, administered by Lord Dawson. The reasons for this course of action seem to have been twofold. Firstly, the King was clearly dying, and seeing him struggle through his last hours was felt to be beneath his dignity, and distressing for his family. Years later, Lord Dawson explained: “At about 11 o’clock it was evident that the last stage might endure for many hours, unknown to the patient but little comporting with the dignity and serenity which he so richly merited and which demanded a brief final scene. Hours of waiting just for the mechanical end when all that is really life has departed only exhausts the onlookers and keeps them so strained that they cannot avail themselves of the solace of thought, communion or prayer.” The other, scarcely believable reason, was that the Royal Family were anxious that the news of the King’s death should appear first in the morning edition of The Times newspaper, rather than the ‘less appropriate’ evening papers, or even the upstart BBC wireless. Therefore, it was decided that the King should die in time to meet The Times’ print deadline. Dawson had even prewarned the editor to hold the front page. Of course, none of this became public knowledge at the time. In fact, it only came out fifty years later, in 1986, when Lord Dawson’s notes were released to the public. There was surprisingly little public outcry, presumably because of the length of time that had passed. A spokesman for Buckingham Palace would only say, “It happened a long time ago, and all those concerned are now dead.” However, there were a few outraged voices. George’s biographer Kenneth Rose was appalled, stating that, “In my opinion the King was murdered by Dawson.” By davidhaviland

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Michio Kaku

Dr. Michio Kaku He (b. January 24, 1947) is an American theoretical physicist specializing in string field theory, and a futurist. He is a popularizer of science, host of two radio programs, and a best-selling author..... Kaku was born in San Jose, California to Japanese immigrant parents, and attended and played first board on the chess team of Cubberly High School in Palo Alto in the early 1960s. At the National Science Fair in Albuquerque, N.M., he attracted the attention of physicist Edward Teller, who took Kaku as a protégé, awarding him the Hertz Engineering Scholarship. Kaku received a B.S. degree summa cum laude from Harvard University in 1968 where he placed first in his physics class. He went on to attend the Berkeley Radiation Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley and received a Ph.D. degree in 1972, and held a lectureship at Princeton University in 1973. During the Vietnam War, Kaku completed his US Army basic training at Fort Benning, Georgia and his advanced infantry training at Fort Lewis, Washington. However, the Vietnam War ended before he could be deployed as an infantryman.... Kaku currently holds the Henry Semat Chair and Professorship in theoretical physics and holds a joint appointment at City College of New York, and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, where he has taught for more than 25 years. Presently, he is engaged defining the "Theory of Everything", which seeks to unify the four fundamental forces of the universe: the strong force, the weak force, gravity and electromagnetism. He has also been a visiting professor at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, and New York University. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society. He is listed in Who's Who in America, Who's Who in the World, Who's Who in Science and Engineering, and American Men and Women of Science...... Kaku has publicly stated his concerns over issues including the human cause of global warming, nuclear armament, nuclear power, and the general misuse of science.[2] He was critical of the Cassini-Huygens space probe because of the 72 pounds of plutonium contained in the craft for use by its radioisotope thermoelectric generator. Alerting the public to the possibility of casualties if its fuel were dispersed into the environment during a malfunction and crash as the probe was making a 'sling-shot' maneuver around earth; he was critical of NASA's risk assessment. [3] (Ultimately, the probe was launched and successfully completed its mission. Kaku is generally a vigorous supporter of the exploration of outer space, believing that the ultimate destiny of the human race may lie in the stars, but is critical of some of the cost-ineffective missions and methods of NASA.),,,, Dr. Kaku credits his anti-nuclear war position to programs he heard on the Pacifica radio network, during his student years in California. It was during this period that he made the decision to turn away from a career developing the next generation of nuclear weapons in association with Dr. Teller and focused on research, teaching, writing and media. Dr. Kaku joined with others such as Dr. Helen Caldicott, Jonathan Schell, Peace Action and was instrumental in building a global anti-nuclear weapons movement that arose in the 1980s, during the administration of US President Ronald Reagan....Dr. Kaku was a board member of Peace Action and on the board of radio station WBAI-FM in New York City where he originated his long running program, Explorations, that focused on the issues of science, war, peace and the environment.

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Vote by May Ram

How to Vote For the Right Candidate in an Election Voting for the right candidate can be tricky. They all want yourvote so they all make the best promises they can think of. Which one should you pick? How should you choose?

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Quantum Physics

IMPLICATIONS – REALLY IMPORT THAT YOU GET IT !!! Now think about the implications here for just a minute. If ALL things in existence at their core are comprised of this same vibrating mass of pure energy, and I do mean ALL things, both the seen as well as the unseen, that means that what the most enlightened teachers in the history of the world have taught and which spiritual texts have shown for thousands of years, we "Really Are ONE!!" To make it a little easier to grasp and comprehend think of ALL things, including YOU as a vibrating mass of pure energy that is intricately interconnected to everything else. 

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Alexis Ohanian: 9 talks about the Internet

Alexis Ohanian: 9 talks about the Internet How I beat a patent troll Drew Curtis, the founder of fark.com, tells the story of how he fought a lawsuit from a company that had a patent, "...for the creation and distribution of news releases via email." Along the way he shares some nutty statistics about the growing legal problem of frivolous patents. Drew Curtis is the founder and administrator of Fark.com. Why you should listen In 1993, while a student in England, Drew Curtis began sending links to his friends. Over time that grew until he founded a website for the links: Fark.com. The site has now grown into one of the largest, and most irreverant, news aggregators on the web. Along with managing Fark.com, Curtis speaks on behalf of other entrepreneurs targeted by "patent trolls" -- an epithet for companies or law firms that file aggressive, broad patent lawsuits against other companies.

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Space by May Ram

How we can transform Mars into a habitable planet, from the Documentary - Mars Underground Some comments:

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10 Scientifically Proven Ways to Be Happy

10. Practice Gratitude: Increase Happiness and Satisfaction This is a seemingly simple strategy but I've personally found it to make a huge difference to my outlook. There are lots of ways to practice gratitude, from keeping a journal of things you're grateful for, sharing three good things that happen each day with a friend or your partner, and going out of your way to show gratitude when others help you.

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Enticing Belly Dance

Turkish Belly Dancer - Didem 72 She is amazing! You can't take eyes of her!

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Have fun with Maths

Transcendental Numbers Numbers like e and Pi cannot be made using normal algebra.  Featuring Australia's Numeracy Ambassador, Simon Pampena. 

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Coffee by May Ram

Coffee in 1616 • 1616 Successful cloth merchant and trader, Pieter Van Dan Broeck, was one of the first Dutchmen to taste coffee.

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Art by May Ram

10 Amazing Smoke Art Pieces This mesmerizing image was created using smoke. This mesmerizing image was created using smoke and is titled 'Jaws'. (Source)

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Fun With Topology

Surfaces and Topology - Professor Raymond Flood Very interesting and thought-provoking lecture on surface and space. Here is the next one on "Probability and its Limits":

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Science News by May Ram

The science behind Santa Santa Claus is able to deliver presents to every child in the world thanks to his anti-matter powered sled – at least according to a pair of Auckland-based scientists.

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Delicious Dance~ Tango and More

Nicole Scherzinger & Derek Hough Viennese Waltz

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Time for fun 2

Time for fun 2 Why did you eat him? A three-year-old walked up to a pregnant lady while waiting with his mother in the doctor’s office.

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Meditation by May Ram

Meditation   Loving Kindness  A guided metta meditation on developing compassion, love and friendship with Buddhist teacher Sharon Salzberg.  "By practicing meditation we establish love, compassion, sympathetic joy & equanimity as our home." 

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Maths Tricks!

How to square any numbers in your head - fast mental math trick Learn how you can square large numbers in your head - instantly! This easy to learn technique will have you calculating the square of numbers up to 100 - without the need for a calculator.

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Inspiration by May Ram

Let Good Events Change Your Brain   Rick Hanson, neuropsychologist, long-time Buddhist dharma teacher, and best-selling author of "Buddha's Brain," writes about how "taking in the good" can change our brains. We have a built-in bi

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The Fibonacci Sequence in Nature

XI. A “DNA” DOUBLE HELIX NEAR THE CENTER OF THE MILKY WAY?!! In March of 2006, an incredible news story was released about a double helix nebula found near the center of the Milky Way.

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by May Ram

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Animated By May

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Gardening by May Ram

Gardening Add a profusion of colorful flowers that come back every year with these no-fuss plants. Electrify the darkest corners of your landscape with shade-loving perennial flowers.

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Lotus & More

How to live in the problematic world? It’s quite difficult for many of us who are facing problems in our lives, to live in the modern world. We’re no longer own our land, grow our own foods, and make our own clothes. We need money to buy almost everything. Money becomes the criteria in determining our quality of life. But I say, that’s not always true.

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The Answers You Seek

How to Avoid Loneliness and Worriness Hi..I am going to write a Hub on How to Avoid Loneliness. Well~ I am sharing my own thoughts and it might be true or for some of you might be not agree with my thoughts but its Alright.Its good for all of us who are facing being lonely.

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Technology News by May Ram

Best Performing Windows Laptop' Is Apple's 13-Inch MacBook Pro: Stud If a new study is to be believed, the "best performing Windows laptop" isn't a Windows laptop at all. It's an Apple MacBook Pro. The 13-inch Apple laptop claimed the top spot in the study of laptops running Microsoft's Windows operating system, conducted by PC management service Soluto. Apple's 15-inch MacBook Pro also broke into the top 10, ringing in at number 6. Other PC manufacturers in the top 10 are Acer, Dell and Lenovo.

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Life by May Ram

Celebrating Falling Apart There are few living things as beautiful and as fragile as the rose. As it becomes undone, it becomes more beautiful – with each fallen petal symbolic of happiness and openness to life’s changing seasons.  How do you consider the nature of the rose, which as Rumi says, “celebrates by falling apart”? Here are some thoughts to get started…

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Time & Space by May Ram

X-ray Burst May Be the First Sign of a Supernova by JASON MAJOR  GRB 080913, a distant supernova detected by Swift. This image merges the view through Swift’s UltraViolet and Optical Telescope, which shows bright stars, and its X-ray Telescope. Credit: NASA/Swift/Stefan Immler

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Artists and Their Artworks

Andy Goldsworthy Naturalist Artist - P3 Using an endless range of natural materials—snow, ice, flowers, leaves, icicles, mud, pine-cones, stones, twigs, thorns, bark, rock, clay, feathers, petals, twigs—Andy Goldsworthy creates outdoor artwork that is usually transient and disappear shortly after creation. Just before they disappear, he takes photographs of his work. Music  "Twelve Dances With God: In a Black Box" by Ian Anderson/Andrew Giddings 

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Diamond Sutra

  Diamond Sutra: Chapter 2     After a time a most venerable monk named Subhuti, who was sitting in the congregation, rose from his seat.

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10 More Extremely Bizarre Malfunctions Of The Body

Cushing’s Syndrome Photo credit: The Mirror The common version of this syndrome isn’t too bizarre on its own. Steroid medications make the adrenal glands secrete too many corticosteroids,

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Health And Wellness by May Ram

21 ways of achieving that happiness you strive for Want to be happy? Here is a wonderful article I found with 21 ways of doing just that. Read it, absorb it… Then experience the happiness you have been waiting for! Good luck!

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10 Ways The Body Reacts To Deadly Extremes

Water     We all know the dangers of dehydration, but we hear less about the dangers of drinking water to excess.

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The 5 Most Horrifying Bugs in the World

Bot Fly (family oestridae, genus and species varies) From:  Most species found in Central and South America, some species found all over the world Why you must fear it:  There are dozen of varieties of Bot Fly, they're each highly adapted to target a specific animal, they have delightfully descriptive names like Horse Stomach Bot Fly, Sheep Nose Bot Fly and, hey, guess what. One of them is called Human Bot Fly.

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10 Of The Oldest Artifacts In The World

The Oldest Tools The oldest tools ever found were discovered in Gona, Ethiopia and are 2.5–2.6 million years old. Not only does this make them the oldest tools, they are theoldest human artifacts in the world to date. The tools are referred to as Oldowan, after the Olduvai Gorge in Tanzanio, and consist of pieces of sharp-edged rock pounded off of cores. They are used to chop and to scrape meat from animal bones.

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Top 4 Spiritual Resolutions for 2015

4) Read More Books are like fuel for the mind.  The allow us to reach a truth about the world we live in and about ourselves. &

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10 Reasons Why Our Universe Is A Virtual Reality

Dark Energy And Dark Matter Physical Realism: Current physics describes the matter we see, but the universe also has five times as much of something called dark matter. It can be detected as a halo around the black hole at the center of our galaxy that binds its stars together more tightly than their gravity allows. It isn’t the matter we see as no light can detect it, it isn’t anti-matter as it has no gamma ray signature, and it isn’t a black hole as there is no gravitational lensing—but without it, the stars of our galaxy would fly apart in chaos.

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Crazy Billionaires

Crazy Billionaires. You Won’t Believe What Number 10 Gets Away With.

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Living in Style by May Ram

Modern Wall Units Furniture for Modern Interior Suggestions  Most individuals like the concept of making use of wall units as a storage piece in different rooms of their residence.

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10 Recent Space Discoveries No One Can Explain

KIC 2856960, The Triple-Star System Photo credit: M. Kornmesse/ESO The Kepler Space Observatory is usually busy hunting down new planets, but it spent four years of its life tracking three gravitationally bound stars collectively known as KIC 2856960. KIC was just a run-of-the-mill triplet, two little dwarf stars orbited by a third stellar body going stag. Nothing weird so far, just three stars.

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10 Mind-Blowing Attempts At Explaining Time

Time Doesn’t Exist There’s also the idea that time doesn’t exist at all, which was wholeheartedly argued in the early 1900s by a philosopher named J.M.E. McTaggart. According to McTaggart, there are two different ways we can look at time. The first, called A-Theory, states that time has an order and flows along a path; in this version of time, it’s possible to organize things as they happen. There’s a progression of events from the past to the present to the future.

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10 Cool And Quirky Facts

Don’t Tase Me, Bro! The electric eel is one dangerous fish. Touch one, and you’ll end up with 600 volts coursing through your body. But while everyone knows electric eels are bad news, we actually didn’t know much about the way they hunted prey. That all changed thanks to Vanderbilt University biologist Kenneth Catania, who discovered that electric eels are long, slimy tasers.

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16 Spiritual Gifts You Didn’t Know You Already Hav

8) Being Someone’s Karate Kid Master Selfless service makes you feel good.  If you are not already volunteering some of your time can you, for one or two hours a week?  I’ve been a volunteer yoga teacher for teen boys in lockdown for drug and alcohol offenses.  It is quite challenging, yet, every time, I leave feeling so energized by actively being the change I want to see in the world.  Try volunteering in a soup kitchen, at the senior center, the animal shelter.  It will fill your heart with compassion and joy, and your time will be well spent.

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Diamonds by May Ram

  WORLD'S MOST EXQUISITE DIAMONDS - TOP 10 TOP TEN DIAMONDS OF THE WORLD - History - Price -   Weights Including: Koh-I-Noor , The Sancy Diamond , The Cullinan, De Beers Centenary Diamond,

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10 Science Headlines That Defined 2014

Saturn’s New Moon Photo credit: NASA/Cassini According to NASA, it would appear that Saturn is the proud owner of a new baby moon, adorably named “Peggy.” New images taken by the Cassini spacecraft show a disturbance in the outer edge of Saturn’s iconic ring system—the result of the gravitational effect of an object within the ring itself.

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10 Most Deadly Rocks and Minerals

Cinnabar Cinnabar (mercury sulfide) is the single most toxic mineral to handle on Earth. The name of the crystal means dragons blood, and it is the main ore of mercury. Forming near volcanos and sulfur deposits, the bright red crystals signal danger of the worst kind.

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Beauty by May Ram

Beauty Myanmar – Thanaka, the secret of beauty Monday, 29 April 2013 22:47 Written by: Southworld Burmese women’s and children’s use of thanaka is a unique custom; we uncover this tradition’s background and the reasons it continues to thrive today

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10 Female Soldiers Who Fought For The Bad Guys

Rose Greenhow A renowned Confederate spy, Rose Greenhow utilized her fame as a celebrated Washington hostess to schmooze her way through the social circles of the Union hierarchy. Extremely well connected, she was able to provide the Confederacy with detailed reports on the defenses of the nation’s capital as well as the movements of Union troops. Her intel greatly helped the Confederate Army during the First Battle of Bull Run, a fight in which the Confederacy routed the Union.

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10 Ways to Catch a Liar

Tip No. 9: Too Much Detail "When you say to someone, 'Oh, where were you?' and they say, 'I went to the store and I needed to get eggs and milk and sugar and I almost hit a dog so I had to go slow,' and on and on, they're giving you too much detail," says Berman. Too much detail could mean they've put a lot of thought into how they're going to get out of a situation and they've crafted a complicated lie as a solution.

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10 Deadly Diseases We Picked Up From Animals

MERS Egyptian Tomb Bat Photo credit: NBC News Middle Eastern respiratory syndrome, or MERS, is a relatively recent illness that has thus far been mostly localized to countries in and around the Arabian Peninsula. While there has yet to be a widespread outbreak of MERS, there are fears that the deadly disease could spread quickly and in a similar fashion to the SARS outbreak. Like SARS, it’s been found that the animal spillover ultimately occurred via bats—the Egyptian tomb bat, to be precise.

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10 Brilliant Generals Forgotten By History

David IV Of Georgia Like Estonia and Israel, Georgia has traditionally been conquered by a different massive empire every few years. However, the Georgians are a resilient people, and for a brief period in the Middle Ages, they even became the most powerful kingdom in the region.

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Gem Hunt

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Gem Hunt by May Ram

  Figure 40. Rounded crystal grains are a common feature of Mogok rubies, such as those seen above, which are probably apatite. (Photo: Wimon Manorotkul) Boehmite   Mogok rubies display one additional type of exsolved needle inclusion: boehmite. Boehmite needles are long white inclusions which form at the junction of intersecting twinning planes and, as a result, lie parallel to faces of the

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10 Pseudoscientists And Their Bizarre Theories

Albert Abrams Radionics In the early 1900s, a doctor named Albert Abrams claimed to have discovered the secret to diagnosing and curing almost any ailment of the human body. He claimed that the answer was in the vibrations that came from each cell. These vibrations, which he called the Electrical Reactions of Abrams, could be read by examining something associated with the patient and then adjusted through the use of one of his many, many devices.

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10 Cool Things You Didn’t Know About Snow

The World’s Largest Snowball Fights The current record for world’s largest snowball fight is held by the inhabitants of Seattle. Anyone who’s lived in the Emerald City knows that it rains there far more than it snows. So when Seattle wanted to sponsor a fundraiser culminating in a record-breaking snowball fight, they had to drive34 truckloads (74,000 kilograms, or 162,000 lb) of snow from the Cascade Mountains to the Seattle Center right next to the Space Needle. Six thousand tickets to the fight were sold online, and each ticket holder received a wristband. On the designated Snow Day, January 12, 2013, 5,834ticket holders scanned their wristbands before entering the arena. The arena was roughly divided in half with a few snow forts scattered about. Some participants brought snowball makers.

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10 Great People You Should Know But Don’t

Jan Wnęk Since reading about Jan Wnęk a year ago, I have desperately sought an opportunity to include him on a list. I am very glad that today that opportunity has arisen, f

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How to Upgrade Your Laptop’s Hard Drive to a SSD

6. Swapping Out the Drives Now that the laptop’s HDD has been successfully cloned to the SSD, it’s time to physically install the SSD. Get access to the laptop’s HDD. Detach the laptop’s power cable and remove the battery before proceeding. If the battery is not removable, then you will just have to continue with the battery installed. Removing the battery is not essential, but it’s a wise precaution, if it's possible. The Satellite M505-S4020 has two removable doors on its underside, the larger of which provides access to the memory and the hard drive. Consult your laptop’s manual to determine where the HDD is located and how to remove it. It should be similar to what we saw:

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10 Discoveries Of Ancient Cultures Nearly Lost To

Kfar Samir Israel About 200 meters (650 ft) off the coast of Haifa, Israel, archaeologists are exploring a fascinating sunken village called Kfar Samir that’s 7,700 years old and 5 meters (16 ft) underwater. Although the people who inhabited this Neolithic village remain a mystery, this settlement may shed light on both our past and our future. Using photogrammetry to produce a 3-D model, archaeologists can take their time analyzing the site on land after spending only a few minutes taking pictures of it underwater. The researchers are particularly interested in studying an ancient water well because once the well became salty from the rising seawater, the inhabitants of Kfar Samir probably threw their garbage down it. From an archaeologist’s point of view, garbage contains a treasure trove of information about a lost civilization. The water well may also be among the oldest wooden structures known to man.

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10 Fascinating Facts About Color

Blue is the most common favorite color Blue is the most favored color in the world, with purple being a distant second.

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10 Most Lovable Animals That Can Become Gruesome C

Ladybugs None of us want to believe that ladybugs could possibly belong on this list, or that these itty bitty insects would ever try to hurt anything. The cold, hard truth is that they do practice cannibalism, and that they are rewarded for doing so. One study found that ladybugs that eat other ladybugs have higherchances of survival and develop more quickly. There’s also a benefit in eating others that have eaten better food, as the superior nutrition gets passed on to the murderous ladybug.

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10 Details We Don’t Know About Everyday Things

Why Do We Age (And At Different Rates)? Every day we deal with the problems of aging, ever so gradually. We’ve been doing it for as long as we’ve been a species, but we have no idea what actually causes it. We know what happens to cells as they age: Muscles lose mass, tissues become more or less rigid, connective tissues stiffen, and new cells become less and less efficient at absorbing nutrients and removing waste. We just don’t know why.

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Top 10 Fascinating Facts About The Mayans

Blood Sacrifice It is a rather well known fact that the Mayans practiced human sacrifice for religious and medical reasons – but what most people don’t know is that many Mayans still practice blood sacrifice. But don’t get too excited – chicken blood has now replaced human blood. Toda

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10 Silly Myths About Famous Architectural Wonders

The Dignity Of The Eiffel Tower The Eiffel Tower is no longer close to one of the tallest buildings in the world, but its style and design have been regularly copied and are now iconic throughout the world. When you think about France, and Paris in particular, the famous tower is often the very first thing that comes to mind.

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10 Ships That Simply Vanished Withou... by May Ram

The SS Baychimo Some would call it a ghost ship, but the Baychimo was real—and she could still be out there.

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10 Animals That Altered The Course Of History

Jim’s Lessons For years, a horse named Jim pulled a milk wagon along the streets of St. Louis, Missouri. In 1898, he got a more sedentary job. Like other horse-heroes in the United States, Jim was periodically injected with diphtheria toxin.

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10 Recent Discoveries That Explain Prehistoric Que

Mammal Ancestors Could Have Easily Hibernated Through Extinction During one of the most tumultuous periods in prehistory, the tiny critters whose descendants would become us were sleeping soundly in spite of widespread carnage right outside their burrows.

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10 Surprising Discoveries About Ancient Health Car

Ancient Medicine Chest Holds 2,000-Year-Old Eye Pills Photo credit: PNAS/Giachi et al. Usually, our knowledge of ancient medicine comes from texts recovered at archaeological sites. But these writings may lack the details and accuracy needed for us to fully understand how ancient medicine worked. That’s why archaeologists became so excited by the discovery of the contents of a medicine chest from a Roman shipwreck near Tuscany around 120 B.C.

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10 Weird Facts About Cats

Milk Although your average cat will lap up a saucer of milk like it’s sweet ambrosia, the fact is, they are lactose-intolerant.

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10 Attempts To Better People’s Lives That Went Hor

UN Peacekeepers Provide Firearms To The Congo The late 1990s heralded an era of unprecedented bloodletting on the continent of Africa with the Congolese Civil War. Sometimes referred to asAfrica’s World War, the conflict engulfed five different countries and lasted for five years.

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10 Devastating Natural Disasters Forgotten By Time

Hokkaido Earthquake 1730 Japan is located where three tectonic plates meet in a so-called “triple junction.” Because of the country’s placement, it has experienced more than 40 recorded extreme earthquakes and various other natural disasters. Up to 1,500 earthquakes occur in Japan annually. Most are fairly small in magnitude and go unnoticed, though the more severe earthquakes tend to cause potentially destructive tsunamis (such as the one depicted in the 19th-century “The Great Wave Off Kanagawa” woodblock printing above).

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10 Ways Monkeys Are More Like Us Than We Think

Monkeys Share Many Of Our Economic Biases When it comes to brand-name price gouging, do lower primates tolerate that kind of monkey business? Not according to Laurie Santos (a psychologist at Yale University) and Yale undergraduate Rhia Catapano. The two are the lead authors of a December 2014 study on the economic values of monkeys.

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Top 10 Most Fatal Occupations

Farmers and Ranchers Death Ratio: 38 out of 100,000 With big toys and long hours, an accident is bound to happen.

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10 Armies That Sent Children Into Battle

Lord’s Resistance Army Northern Uganda The Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), led by Joseph Kony, has been terrorizing Northern Uganda and the surrounding area for nearly three decades. Initially formed in order to topple the Ugandan government, the LRA began taking young children into its ranks after Kony lost the little initial support he had. The methods employed by the LRA are appalling, as the group has been known to force their captives to rape or murder members of their own family, making them orphans and preventing them from ever returning home.

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Raising Small Souls!

Signs of Being Bullied From: Melody Spier  There have always been bullies in the world, but it seems in recent years bullying has gotten a lot worse. Perhaps it is just being recognized and addressed more than in years past, but the fact remains, children get bullied not only at school but at home, online and in other public locations. So how do you know if your child is being bullied? There are certain warning signs that you can look for, including but certainly not limited to:

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Music To Enjoy

Test Just testing for one of my clients.

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Nature & Animals by May Ram

Hawaiian Plants and Tropical Flowers   The Hawaiian Islands have an interesting variety of plant species, with about half being native species and half being introduced species. Because of Hawaii's remote, isolated location in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, 89 percent of the native plants found here are endemic (native to nowhere else in the World).

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10 Awe-Inspiring Historic Buildings

The Forbidden City Was One Vast Prison Photo credit: Yinan Chen Sprawling over a 178-acre site, China’s Forbidden City is every kid’s dream ofwhat a palace should be. Along with a gigantic throne room, the seat of government featured a harem trained to attend to the emperor’s every whim

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10 Pets That Put Killers Behind Bars

Two Attack Dogs Turn Tail We all know that the Brits love their hounds, so it seems only right that dog DNA should be featured in a murder trial in the United Kingdom. The DNA not only helped to condemn one man accused of murder, but it also cleared the name of another.

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10 People Who Were The Last Of Their... by May Ram

The Last Don Photo credit: Federal Bureau of Investigations By the early 2000s, New York’s feared “Five Families” of the Cosa Nostra were a shell of their former selves. John Gotti, the terrifying leader of the Gambino crime family, had died in prison. The bosses of the Genovese and Colombo crime families had been incarcerated. And Little Al D’Arco, of the Lucchese family, had turned against the Mafia to become a government witness.

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Women Mathematicians

Ada Byron, Lady Lovelace December 10, 1815 - November 27, 1852 Contributed by Dr. Betty Toole Ada Byron, Lady Lovelace, was one of the most picturesque characters in computer history. Augusta Ada Byron was born December 10, 1815 the daughter of the illustrious poet, Lord Byron. Five weeks after Ada was born Lady Byron asked for a separation from Lord Byron, and was awarded sole custody of Ada who she brought up to be a mathematician and scientist. Lady Byron was terrified that Ada might end up being a poet like her father. Despite Lady Byron's programming Ada did not sublimate her poetical inclinations. She hoped to be "an analyst and a metaphysician". In her 30's she wrote her mother, if you can't give me poetry, can't you give me "poetical science?" Her understanding of mathematics was laced with imagination, and described in metaphors.

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10 Famous Cases Of Dissociative Identity Disorder

Juanita Maxwell In 1979, 23-year-old Juanita Maxwell was working as a hotel maid in Fort Myers, Florida. In March that year, 72-year-old hotel guest Inez Kelley was brutally murdered; she was beaten, bitten, and choked to death. Maxwell was arrested because she had blood on her shoes and a scratch on her face. She claimed she had no idea what happened.

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10 Final Messages From People Facing Certain Death

The Kursk Submarine Disaster On August 12, 2000, the Russian nuclear submarine Kursk was on an exercise in the Barents Sea. For reasons that aren’t fully known, an explosion blew a hole in the submarine, and the vessel began to sink. Shortly afterward, its remaining torpedoes exploded. The submarine hit the seabed.

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10 Secret Societies That Influenced History

The Bonnot Gang Photo credit: Alphonse Bertillon Unlike the other organizations on this list, the Bonnot Gang, which terrorized France between 1911 and 1912, straddle the line between a secret society and a fairly straightforward criminal enterprise. Also known as the “Auto Bandits,” the Bonnot Gang became the first group to use a getaway car after their daring robbery of a Societe Generale bank in Paris.

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Ancient Worlds

Ancient 15 Fascinating Facts About Ancient Egypt JAMIE FRATER AUGUST 29, 2008 Ever since my childhood I have been fascinated with all things relating to Ancient Egypt. I have tried for a long time to come up with a good idea for a list relating to it and this is the first (of what I hope will be many!) These facts should serve as a good introduction to Ancient Egyptian culture and society – and hopefully many will be things you did not know.

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The Secrets Of Nature by May Ram

The Secrets Of Nature The Drava, or Drau as it is known in Austria, is one of the last big, partially untamed lowland rivers of central Europe. Whereas in Austria the river is forced into a narrow concrete corset after a few kilometers, the lower reaches of the Drava at the border between Hungary and Croatia is practically untouched. For years it was cut off from the outside world by the Iron Curtain. At that time only soldiers were permitted to enter the border area. This allowed the areas along the Drava to keep its incredible variety of plant and animal life. Here black storks breed in the solitude of the forest, kingfishers and sea eagles fish in the branches of the Drava and innumerable bank swallows make their nests in the steep slopes rising from the river.

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The Secrets Of Nature By May

Limits of Perception - The Secrets of Nature This is a journey form the smallest manmade hole - by removing just one single atom - to the edge of the universe. Man has finally succeeded in making the ancient dream of Greek philosophers come true - to «see» an atom. In another direction we also seem to have unlimited sight: the «Hubble Telescope» grants us a glimpse of the remotest galaxies.

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10 Of The Most Frontierswomen In American History

Fannie Porter Painting by William Hogarth Easily one of the most successful businesswomen of all time, you could say Fannie Porter was a natural entrepreneur. By the age of 20, the young widow was running her own luxury bordello in San Antonio, Texas, and catering to the likes of the Wild Bunch as well as Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. For a while,

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10 Strange Earthly Mysteries

Why Guinness Bubbles Sink It doesn’t happen every time, but when it does, it makes a great party trick: Sometimes, the bubbles in a glass of Guinness go down when we would expect them to go up. Chemists from Stanford University and the University of Edinburgh decided to find out why. It turns out that the bubbles in the middle of the glass do go up. However, as the liquid circulates from the middle of the glass toward the sides and down again, it pulls the bubbles down with them.

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10 Forgotten Ancient Temples That St... by May Ram

The Great Plaza Temples Photo credit: Dennis Jarvis The Great Plaza is the most important building in Tilak, Guatemala. It is also home to two ancient Mayan temples—Temple I, also called the “Temple of the Great Jaguar,” and Temple II, also called the “Temple of the Mask.”

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10 Forgotten Explorers And

10 Forgotten Explorers And Their Expeditions RADU ALEXANDER MARCH 30, 2015 History tends to look very kindly on those with an adventurous spirit. Whatever their mishaps and shortcomings might have been, they get remembered as courageous explorers who braved the unknown, and their perilous journeys become almost as famous as they do. Think of Edmund Hillary conquering Everest or Robert Scott’s trips to Antarctica. Of course, not every explorer achieves this level of fame. Some of them are almost forgotten, though they put themselves at considerable risk to help us better understand the strange world around us.

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10 Amazing Forgotten Explorers

Even More Auguste Piccard  1884–1962 Auguste Piccard was no one-hit wonder, hence his place here twice. We just couldn’t keep him off the list with all the records he’s broken. Being the first man to enter the stratosphere was only the beginning for him. After World War II ended and funding to match his ambition became available, Piccard pursued his next dream—deep-sea exploration.

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10 Real Scientific Experiments So Ad... by May Ram

At What Age Do We First Perceive Race? Experts disagree on the significance of race. Studies have repeatedly shown that your race can indicate your vulnerability to certain diseases, but some anthropologists insist that race is entirely a social construct. Some aspects of our attitudes toward race are certainly learned.

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10 Painful Conditions

Chronic Lyme Disease Lyme disease is a very treatable condition that usually requires about four weeks of treatment using antibiotics. The disease, which is caused by a tick bite, is particularly prevalent in the northeast portion of the United States but can be found in numerous other locations.

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10 Intriguing And Mysterious Archaeological Sites

Tel Burna Israel Photo credit: Joeuziel/Wikimedia Tel Burna in south-central Israel is another site that may be steeped in religious history. Archaeologists have discovered an Iron Age fortified settlement and artifacts that suggest to some scholars that Tel Burna is actually the biblical town of Libnah, one of the locations where the Israelites stopped during the Exodus when Moses led them out of Egypt. If so, the town would have been part of the Kingdom of Judah, which also included Jerusalem. In ancient times, this region was the border between the Kingdom of Judah in the east and the Philistines in the west. Until as recently as 2009, Tel Burna had not been seriously researched. However, the true identity of Tel Burna has been the subject of intense debate for over 100 years.

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10 Scientific Reversals Of The World... by May Ram

Reversal Of Cellular Aging Photo credit: Pleiotrope/Wikimedia We’ve previously discussed the immortal jellyfish, Turritopsis nutricula, which can revert to an immature stage of development if it becomes damaged.

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10 Acts Of Kindness From Those On The Wrong Side O

The Forgotten Chinese Soldiers Photo via Wikimedia After what we’ve just read about Nanking, it might seem incredible to think Chinese soldiers who fought the Japanese could have been on the wrong side of history. For that, you can thank the Chinese Civil War.

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10 Hidden Abilities Discovered In We... by May Ram

Crocodiles Play It turns out crocodiles are just misunderstood. New research from the University of Tennessee shows that the fierce modern-day dinosaur is, in reality, a fun-loving doofus.

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10 Attempts To Create An Ideal Unive... by May Ram

Solresol In the early 19th century, the musician Jean Francois Sudre developed a method of associating letters of the alphabet with musical notes, allowing him to ask his students questions by playing his violin, which they responded to on piano.

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10 Decisions With Bizarrely Unexpect... by May Ram

The French Revolution Delayed The Abolition Of Slavery Photo credit: Bibliotheque Nationale de France The year 1792 was a bad one for British slavery. The radical Society for the Abolition of the Slave Trade under Thomas Clarkson had successfully delivered 519 separate petitions to the House of Commons demanding abolition, the single biggest number ever delivered on any issue.

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10 Stunning New Ways To Visualize Ho... by May Ram

Earth In False Colors Photo credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory Don’t worry—the Earth is totally fine. The bloody reds and post-apocalyptic browns actually show a proliferation of vegetation across the planet and not some kind of theoretical doomsday scenario.

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10 Amateurs Who Showed Up Real Scien... by May Ram

A Rock Star Develops A Missile Defense System Jeff “Skunk” Baxter is well known to music fans as a guitarist for the Doobie Brothers and a founding member of Steely Dan, but the self-described hippie guitarist now enjoys a second career as one of the top counterterrorism expert in the US.

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10 Common Misconceptions About Basic... by May Ram

Boa Constrictors Are Not That Dangerous Photo credit: Maarten Sepp Venomous snakes are widely recognized as potentially dangerous, and people are almost equally afraid of boa constrictors.

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Healthing Living by May Ram

The Cancer-Fighting Breakfast Folate is an important B vitamin that may help protect against cancers of the colon, rectum, and breast.  You can find it in abundance on the breakfast table. Fortified breakfast cereals and whole wheat products are good sources of folate. So are orange juice, melons, and strawberries.

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BamBoo by May Ram

Where Bamboo Grows The woody grass known as bamboo is generally thought to be a plant more associated with growing in places like Southeast Asia. But truthfully, bamboo can grow just about anywhere. Depending on what species of bamboo is trying to sprout, it can grow only in sub-tropic areas or in places as cold as Iowa. Ancient Bamboo Before widespread urban sprawl, bamboo grew on every continent except Antarctica and Europe. The most common place for bamboo to grow is in Southeast Asia and it has been growing there for millions of years. Even America has native bamboo. Over five million acres of land in the American Southeast were once covered in native bamboo called Cane Break. It wasn't until the migration movements of the early 19th century by settlers that any of the bamboo that was growing was destroyed because it grew in the good soil that was then turned into farms. It is hypothesized that the first humans to populate the areas of Southeast Asia relied on bamboo instead of stone as the main building material. The number of artifacts found from that area indicates that stone wasn't nearly as popular as bamboo in that part of the world at that time. But now it is possible for bamboo to grow almost anywhere.

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10 Myths And Misconceptions About Wo... by May Ram

Ebonics Is Lazy English Many people in the United States, usually white people, believe that Ebonics, or African American Vernacular English (AAVE), is nothing more than poor grammar, lazy pronunciation, and slang. In 1996, an Oakland, California, school tried to recognize AAVE as a distinct dialect for educational purposes, and uninformed people across the country were outraged. 

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10 Bizarre Claims From Scientology’s... by May Ram

Engrams All of Scientology’s ideas on psychiatry are, of course, coming from their fearless founder, L. Ron Hubbard. His hatred of psychiatry is in no small way based on his having written his own version of therapy and, according to him, having discovered the real root cause of all mental distress.

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10 More Amazing Weather Phenomena

10 More Amazing Weather Phenomena As a follow up to Cedestras brilliant list of 20 amazing and unusual weather phenomena, I have decided to make a list with 10 more items. Our atmosphere shows off so many strange and wonderful displays, but often times these brilliant phenomena happen so rarely, and in places all over the world (insert lame ‘once in a blue moon’ pun here). Now then, onto the list!

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10 Scary Holes With Deadly Pasts

The Haunted Mammoth Caves Photo credit: Daniel Schwen The Mammoth Cave in Kentucky is said to be haunted by Floyd Collins, an explorer who died there in 1925 after his leg was pinned under a rock. He was located shortly afterward, but rescuers weren’t able to get to him. He was stuck for two weeks and died just a few days before help managed to get through.

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TURMERIC MILK by May Ram

TURMERIC MILK    PRINT PREP TIME 5 mins COOK TIME 20 mins TOTAL TIME 25 mins   A classic comforting warm and boldly spiced turmeric milk with a hint of sweetness. Author: McKel Hill, MS, RD, LDN Recipe type: beverage Serves: 2 INGREDIENTS

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10 Of The Most Impressive Ants On Th... by May Ram

10 Of The Most Impressive Ants On The Planet MONTE RICHARD II MAY 5, 2015 With the upcoming movie Ant Man receiving so much hype, many people are asking, “What’s so special about ants?” They’re small pests at best and full-blown infestations at worst. They scurry all around us, and we rarely even notice. It’s not until you get down to their level that you begin to see how interesting, utterly fascinating, and terrifying the world of ants truly is.

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The Most Impressive Ants

Pheidole Prehistoric Super Soldier Ants Photo credit: April Nobile Pheidole is a genus of ant where the soldiers have really, really big heads. Unsurprisingly, they’re called big-headed ants. One species, Pheidole megacephala, is also in the top 100 worst invasive species list.

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Top 10 Species Rediscovered This Century

Bavarian Pine Vole Microtus bavaricus Thought extinct: 1962 Rediscovered: 2000/2001 Current status: Critically Endangered The rediscovery of this small rodent, indigenous to the Alpine regions of Bavaria,

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10 Ways We’re All Picturing The Anci... by May Ram

Brontosaurus Really Did Exist Photo credit: Matt Wedel For a whole generation of dinosaur fans, nothing sets their teeth on edge more than the word “brontosaurus.” It’s been known since 1903 that the man who discovered the thunder lizard, O.C. Marsh, was

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10 Legendary Magicians You’ve Probab... by May Ram

10 Legendary Magicians You’ve Probably Never Heard About GEORGE RUMTIC MAY 6, 2015 Harry Houdini, Penn and Teller, David Copperfield—these are the big names that we have come to associate with magic and illusion. But what about those who came before? Who was the first to pull a rabbit out of a hat? Who was the first to make a lady disappear? The following is a list of some of the most legendary magicians of our millennium who have regrettably faded from popular culture. 10Joseph Buatier De Kolta

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10 Fascinating Ways Our Brains Can B... by May Ram

The Invisible Body Illusion Building on the illusions we’ve already talked about where someone feels a ghostly presence around them or feels as though they’ve swapped bodies, scientists have discovered how to trick your brain to make you feel invisible. In a test involving 20 people, 75 percent experienced the illusion. With the test subject wearing a headset linked to cameras pointing into empty space, a researcher brushed the participant’s stomach while that person viewed a brush stroking empty space in the same way. As the participant’s brain tried to combine what it was seeing and feeling to determine where he was, the person sensed that his body inhabited empty space.

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10 Debunked Scientific Studies

Eating Chocolate Can Win You A Nobel Prize Everyone loves chocolate, and everyone loves the idea of becoming important while putting in zero effort. In 2012, those two strands collided in a scientific study which claimed that per-capita chocolate consumption was directly linked to how many Nobel Prize winners a country produced.

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10 Man-Made Nanomaterials With Futuristic Powers

Glowing Clothes Light-emitting fibers are being developed by Shanghai researchers, and they could be woven into articles of clothing. Finally, you’ll have something to wear when you want to match the decor at an 1980s neon nightclub.

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10 Intriguing Clues About Ancient Eg... by May Ram

Tutankhamun Modern portrayals of Tutankhamun, an Egyptian pharaoh who began his rule as a nine-year-old in the 1330s BC, are a source of contention. Some Afrocentric scholars claim that popular depictions of the pharaoh (popularly known as “King Tut”) as white are racist and egregiously inaccurate. Things became even more heated after Egyptian scientists sequenced Tut’s DNA.

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Raw Honey

Raw Honey What's so Special about Raw Honey?   What's raw honey? Why isn't all honey raw? It's probably not too difficult to remember well what "raw" means when you associate it with uncooked vegetables and meat whereby any form of heating is avoided so as to ensure all the natural vitamins and living enzymesand other nutritional elements are preserved.

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10 Mysterious And Enthralling Buildings Older Than

West Kennet Long Barrow 3650 BC Photo credit: Ark3pix/Wikimedia Seven hundred years before Stonehenge was being prepared, West Kennet Long Barrow was already built, just 25 kilometers (15 mi) from the famous stone circle.

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Science & Nature By May Ram

Power of Thoughts - The Unbelievable Power of Humans Just as you create your own reality, we are also co-creating our realities together. We are a collective! As a community, a city, a country, and a species, we decide where we want to go and how we want to flow. It is up to us to decide what happens next in the epic tale that is the human race, but change has to start from an individual level.

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10 Strange Unsolved Train Mysteries by May Ram

The Murder Of Seymour Barmore In 1868, a Cincinnati private investigator named Seymour Barmore was brought to Nashville for an unusual assignment from Tennessee governor William Gannaway Brownlow.

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Life & Motivation

The Ancients" knew much more than given credit for regarding Life, The Universe, Astronomy, Advanced Mathematics, Magnetism, Healing, Unseen Forces etc. Encoded knowledge is information that is conveyed in signs and symbols and we can find this knowledge all over the world. All these ancient sightings and geometric patterns (Sacred Geometry) symbolise unseen forces at work. We are being lied to by the media. Modern archaeologists don't know what they're talking about. "The Ancients" were not stupid or primitive. We just failed to de-code this knowledge conveyed in signs, symbols and ancient artwork. This kind of information is kept hidden from the public. 

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Top 10 Common Faults In Human Thought

Placebo Effect The Placebo effect is when an ineffectual substance that is believed to have healing properties produces the desired effect. Especially common with medications, the placebo effect has been observed when individuals given a sugar pill for a real ailment report improvement.

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10 Things You Should Know About Biohacking

So What Are The Potential Dangers? While many biohackers say that organizations like the FBI are overreacting to the potential dangers, others are trying to show just how under-the-skin implants can be used for evil instead of good. US Navy petty officer Seth Wahle picked up a chip that was originally supposed to be used for monitoring cattle. He injected it into his hand, and it’s now undetectable—by humans, at least.

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Flowering plants by May Ram

How To Grow Impatiens Plants   Image by Beth Coll Anderson By Heather Rhoades Impatiens flowers are bright and cheerful annuals that can light up any dark and shady part of your yard. Growing impatiens is quite easy, but there are a few things to know about impatiens care. Let’s take a look at how to plant and how to grow impatiens.

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10 UFOs That Allegedly Left Physical... by May Ram

The Killer Ice Cream Cone On January 7, 1948, Captain Thomas Mantell was leading a squadron of four F-51 Mustangs to an airfield in northern Kentucky, unaware that a giantcone-shaped object in the air was already freaking out civilians, military, and highway patrols.

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10 Weird Tricks To Make Your Life Easier

Don’t Try To Succeed Most people are of a particular mindset: if you work harder you’ll be successful, and if you’re successful you’ll be happy. According to psychologist Shawn Achor, the reality is actually the opposite.

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Weird facts about the world

Weird facts about the world The bizarre world of the McGurk Effect: How your brain lies to you every day

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10 Major Natural Disasters Predicted In The Near F

Baroarbunga Volcanic Explosion Iceland, 2014 Photo credit: Peter Hartree This prediction came true within a few weeks of it being made.

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10 Terrifying Places Haunted By The Ghosts Of Brut

The Ostrich Inn Photo credit: Maxwell Hamilton John Jarman had a clever plan. His inn was conveniently situated on Colnbrook’s main thoroughfare, a tempting sight for weary travelers dusty and worn from the long road into London.

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10 Uplifting Stories Of Prison Guards Who Were Res

10 Uplifting Stories Of Prison Guards Who Were Rescued By Inmates ROBERT GRIMMINCK MAY 25, 2015 Prison guards, more formally known as correctional officers, have a job that would be a nightmare for most people. They willingly work in a building made out of cement and metal that has some incredibly dangerous and unpredictable people locked up inside. When guards are working, they could become victim to a terrifying act of violence at any moment. Then there are some amazing incidents where guards in danger are actually saved by the inmates they’re guarding. 10Unidentified Officer  Lee Correctional Institution

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A Guide to a Perfect Mind-Body Balance

A Guide to a Perfect Mind-Body Balance Compassion A praise of compassion by Lama Zopa Rinpoche: “Live with compassion Work with compassion Die with compassion Meditate with compassion Enjoy with compassion When problems come, Experience them with compassion.” I have tried my best to embody compassion in my life.

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10 Reasons Hummingbirds Are Absolutely Astounding

Torpor For hummingbirds, maintaining energy levels is crucial. Especially because hummingbirds are the smallest warm-blooded creatures in the world with the highest metabolism in the world.

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10 Fascinating Facts About Ancient Cuisine

10 Fascinating Facts About Ancient Cuisine DAVID TORMSEN MAY 28, 2015 They say that the past is another country, and if you look at the eating habits of the peoples of the ancient world, you can see why. Here are 10 surprising examples of the weirdness of ancient eating culture. 10Rome’s MSG-Laden Food

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10 More Fascinating Food Facts

Russian Service While most of our Western food flavors originate in French cuisine, the style of service we are all most used to – individual plates pre-filled and served – is called Russian service,

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19 Exotic Fruits

5-kiwano melon or Cucumber When it is exported to the U.S., the horned cucumber is often labeled as “blowfish fruit.

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10 Bizarre Calendars From History

The Ethiopian Orthodox Calendar Ethiopia celebrated the new millennium on September 12, 2007, seven and a half years behind the West. This is because they use the Coptic Orthodox calendar, which is used by the Coptic Orthodox Church and is similar to the Jewish calendar. The calendar has 13 months of 30 days each, and leap years have an extra month of five or six days. The calendar was used by the Westprior to 1582, when they changed to the Gregorian calendar.

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10 Regular People Who Have Walked Amazing Distance

Peace Pilgrim Peace Pilgrim, born Mildred Norman, is one of the original high-profile walkers. Her walking escapades started in 1952, when she became the first woman to complete the entire 3,500-kilometer (2,175 mi) Appalachian Trail in one season. Then, in 1953, she decided to dedicate her life to walking the United States. For the next 28 years, she claims she wore the same clothes every day and only carried a pen, a comb, a toothbrush, and a map. She said she would fast until someone gave her food and would walk until she found shelter.

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10 Important Advances Made Due to Beer

The Age Of Exploration The European voyages to discover and colonize land during the Age of Exploration were very long, with little to no chance of stopping in at a port to resupply. So the rations aboard had to last long enough that the crew would not die of starvation on the journey.

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10 Assassinated Leaders Whose Killers Were Never C

Sharon Tyndale Early in the morning of April 29, 1871, former Illinois secretary of stateSharon Tyndale left his house to catch a train at a nearby train station.

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iPhone Accessories

iPhone Accessories  15 Unique iPhone Holders and Unusual iPhone Holder Designs Collection of unique iPhone holders and unusual smartphone holder designs from all over the world.  iClooly Aluminum iPhone Stand: Turn your iPhone into an adorable mini iMac with this cool stand.  Spiderpodium iPhone Holder: A cool iPhone holder holds your device on eight bendable spider-like legs. 

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21 Incredible Flowers in the World

4. Waxplant (Hoya).

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Top Ten Spooky Plants

Witch Hazel (Hamamelis) Silhouette of Witch Hazel. Photo Credit: Belgianchocolate Witch Hazel. Photo Credit: London Looks

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10 Dark Transylvanian Legends

The Mysterious Falling Boy Photo credit: Vlad Moldovean The Black Church in Brasov is one of the most beautiful Gothic constructions in Romania. It was damaged by a fire in the 17th century, hence the name.

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10 Facts That Make Ferocious Animals Even More Ter

Scorpions Squirt Venom At Enemies Scorpions are right up there with spiders in the “most terrifying many-legged creature” category. In fact, nature has even merged the two arachnids into one terrible creation called the camel spider.

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Nature Videos!

Nature Videos! Top Ten Amazing Fruits that Grow in Weird Ways Cashew   The cashew (Anacardium occidentale) is a tree in the family Anacardiaceae which produces a seed that is harvested as the cashew nut. Its English name derives from the Portuguese name for the fruit of the cashew tree, caju. The cashew nut is a popular snack and food source. Cashews, unlike other oily tree nuts, contain starch to about 10% of their weight. This makes them more effective than other nuts in thickening water-based dishes such as soups, meat stews, and some Indian milk-based desserts. Many southeast Asian and south Asian cuisines use cashews for this unusual characteristic, rather than other nuts.

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10 Ways Our Search For Alien Life Is Evolving

Heat Signatures Using data from 100,000 galaxies observed by NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) spacecraft, scientists looked for heat signatures that would suggest the existence of advanced alien civilizations.

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10 Post-Human Entities Who Could Inherit The Earth

Transgenic Humans Transgenic animals have a foreign gene deliberately inserted into their genome. This technology has been used to create glow-in-the-dark mice as well as Glofish, fish which have been genetically altered with luminescent colors.

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10 Pairs Of Animals You Won’t Believe Are Related

Horseshoe Crabs And Spiders Horseshoe crabs were misidentified as crabs hundreds of years ago. Granted, they spend most of their time crawling over the sea floor and have a crab-like shell roughly resembling a horseshoe. However, they are grouped with arachnids.

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10 Invasive Species That Helped The ... by May Ram

Tamarisk Shrubs And Southwestern Willow Flycatcher Nests The plight of the southwestern willow flycatcher is the result of so many unintended consequences caused by the repeated efforts of the US government that it borders on comical.

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10 Creepy Spiders We’ve Recently Discovered

Decoy-Building Spider Time and time again, the Amazon has proven itself to be an amazing host for many unusual spiders. In 2012, a suspected new member of the genusCyclosa was discovered in the dense jungle and has been dubbed the decoy-building spider. To the casual onlooker, it would appear to be nothing more than a somewhat decomposed spider sitting in the middle of a web. Yet when inspected more closely, one would see that in the place where the head would be sits a smaller spider only about 1 centimeter (0.4 in) in length.

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10 Of The Strangest Unsolved Hospital Mysteries

The Disappearance Of Philistine Saintcyr Philistine Saintcyr was a 66-year-old Haitian immigrant who lived in Immokalee, Florida, in 2006. On April 26 of that year, Philistine suffered a medical emergency. He was airlifted to NCH North Naples Hospital over 65 kilometers (40 mi) away, where he was treated for high blood pressure.

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10 Fascinating Mysteries Of Life Tha... by May Ram

Animals That Can Live Without Oxygen Photo credit: Carolyn Gast Nearly every organism on Earth lives with the help of oxygen in some way, either by consuming it or producing it. That was the reason everyone was shocked when the first oxygen-free animals were found deep in the Mediterranean Sea.

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9 Seeds You Should Be Eating

9 Seeds You Should Be Eating Chia Seeds Chia has come a long way since it first sprouted out of funny pottery in TV commercials. Today, these seeds are best known as a super food, and with good reason. Just 1 ounce (that’s 2 tablespoons) has nearly 10 grams of fiber. Ground in a blender, chia seeds make the perfect crunchy topping for yogurt or vegetables. When you soak them in a liquid, such as juice or almond milk, they get soft and spoonable: a smart swap for pudding.

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10 Unsolved Mysteries of Science

6. The reason of taking a nap: The scientists say that during our sleep, the tissues get repaired and muscular energy is restored but we also see organisms whose life forms are more complex than humans and those animals don’t sleep.

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Chia

Chia   Papaya Chia Seed Pudding Recipe Chia seed is the new superfood that is sold in any grocery store and is recommended by many athletes and other health authorities. There is also a belief chia seeds help in weight loss but studies remain inconclusive. According to the USDA, a 1 oz serving of chia seeds contains 9 g of fat, 11 g of fiber and 4 g of protein.

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10 Totally Bizarre Holes

The Devil’s Sinkhole The Devil’s Sinkhole is a massive underground chamber located in Edwards County, Texas. An opening 15 meters (50 ft) wide leads to a cavern 106 meters (350 ft) deep that now plays a unique ecological role as home to one of the largest known colonies of Mexican free-tailed bats. While they’re not actually allowed into the cavern, visitors can see more than three million bats fly from the entrance to the sinkhole every night throughout the summer months.

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10 Amazing Videos That Reveal The Lives Of Incredi

10 Amazing Videos That Reveal The Lives Of Incredibly Unique Individuals  NOLAN MOORE JUNE 17, 2015  The world is full of unusual and unique people. Unfortunately for us, most of them never meet filmmakers interested in telling their stories. However, every so often, someone with a camera stumbles across a truly extraordinary person, and when that happens, the results are pretty awesome. In this list, we’re looking at 10 short documentaries that capture some really crazy and colorful characters, people who make this planet an incredibly interesting place. 10The Reinvention Of Normal 

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10 Mysteries And Legends

Tokyo’s Secret Underground Network Photo credit: Nyao148 In 2002, journalist Shun Akiba published Teito Tokyo Kakusareta Chikamono Himitsu (translated as Imperial City Tokyo: Secret of a Hidden Underground Network), in which he claimed to have uncovered evidence of a secret network of tunnels by comparing historical and modern subway maps.

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10 Mind-Bending Facts About Sea Stars by May Ram

Sea Stars Can Switch Gender At Will Often, the simpler an animal is, the more remarkable its abilities are, such as regenerating parts or switching gender. Certain sea stars can start out as one gender, switch, and then even switch back at a later date. Reasons for switching genders are diverse, and may include breeding convenience and various responses to water quality, temperature, and food availability. Gender differences in sea stars are subtle from an external perspective, though males are smaller than females in certain species. Even flipping a sea star over may not always indicate its gender.

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Insight on the Concept of Mpemba Effect

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Insight on the Concept of Mpemba Effect by May Ram

Insight on the Concept of Mpemba Effect The Mpemba effect is the assertion that warmer water can freeze faster than cold water and is so named after a Tanzanian student, Erasto Mpemba from Africa. His first encounter with this phenomenon started in 1963 in Form 3 of Magamba Secondary School while freezing ice cream mix which was hot initially and his observation that it froze before the cold mix. On upgrading from his O level examinations, he went on to be a student of Mkwawa Secondary School in Iringa, Tanzania where the headmaster invited Dr. Denis G. Osborne from the University College, to conduct lecture on physics after which, Mpemba put forward a question asking why, when two similar containers with equal volume of water, one at a temperature of 35 degrees Cent; and the other at 100 degrees Cent; when placed in the freezer, the one with 100 degrees Cent; freeze first. For this, Erasto Mpemba was ridiculed by his classmates as well as his teachers, but after initial confusion, Dr. Osborne experimented back at his workplace and confirmed Mpemba’s finding and the results were published in 1969. To understand the factors involved in how the water freezes will help to explain the Mpemba Effect. Here the temperature is the factor in water freezing and the temperature of water in the container is the average energy of its molecules where the heat of the water is defined as total amount of energy of its molecules. The heat depends on the content of the water and how many molecules are present in the container. The change takes place when a container of water is placed in the refrigerator, in the freezer compartment,

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10 Creepy Mysteries You Haven’t Hear... by May Ram

Devil’s Footprints On the night of 8–9 February, 1855, and one or two later nights, after a light snowfall, a series of hoof-like marks appeared in the snow.

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10 People Who Claimed To Visit Other Planets

Howard Menger UFO contactee and alleged reincarnated Saturnian Howard Menger claimed to have been taken on joyrides through the solar system on a flying saucer. His interaction with aliens began at the age of 10 when a mysterious woman in the forest told him he was chosen and destined for great things.

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10 Incredible Stories Of Whales, Dolphins And Porp

Migaloo In 1991, a pure white humpback whale was spotted near the Great Barrier Reef in Australia, migrating from Antarctica to the coast of northern Australia. After almost 25 years, the white whale called Migaloo is one of Australia’s biggest whale-watching attractions.

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My Favorite Recipes by May Ram

My Favorite Recipes Recipe: Pumpkin Soup in its Shell volume 4 Issue 45 Tags pumpkin soup pumpkin shell pumpkin soup in the shell I am always looking for creative ways to cook and serve the traditional Thanksgiving meal. Some years ago, I followed this recipe for a Halloween party, and this year I have decided to use it for Thanksgiving. Serving the soup in a pumpkin shell is not absolutely necessary, but it certainly makes it more festive, attractive, and fun. Use one large pumpkin shell for the table or small pumpkin shells for individual servings. Preparin

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The Forbidden Rice

Black Rice Recipes Not sure what to do with black rice? It makes a delicious side dish all on its own with some salt and pepper, but can also be added to stir fries, soups and stews, or sprinkled on top of a salad. Add cooked black rice to homemade veggie burgers, in burritos instead of white rice, or served with fresh roasted vegetables and your favorite source of protein.

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10 Intense Extraterrestrial Storms

Saturn’s Mesmerizing Hexagon Photo via Wikipedia Perhaps the most stunning and mysterious vortex in the solar system, Saturn’s hexagon never fails to induce awe in those who gaze upon its majesty. Large enough to engulf four Earths and taking over 10 hours forone rotation, this enormous storm and its unusual shape beg for an explanation.

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How!

Summer means it's sticky hot. So hot you might be tempted to dissolve into a pool of sweat without doing a thing to help yourself. Fight the urge and grab some ice, because only you can prevent death by melting. If your brain feels too sizzling to think of cool off solutions, follow the example of these industrious dogs. Rather than complain about the face-dissolving humidity, Fido creates hot weather remedies. Just don't run naked through the park.

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Animals & Nature by May Ram

The term deep sea creature refers to organisms that live below the photic zone of the ocean. These creatures must survive in extremely harsh conditions, such as hundreds of atmospheres of pressure, small amounts of oxygen, very little food, no sunlight, and constant, extreme cold. Most creatures have to depend on food floating down from above.

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Summer Food & Drinks

10 Ways to Detoxify Your Body         Body cleanse and detox diet tips for beginners Three naturopathic physicians share insight on why and when to detox, what type of detox program is right for you, and 10 ways to start.   Feeling sluggish or out of sync? Having skin problems, aches and pains, or digestive problems? Straying from your healthier habits lately? Having trouble kicking off your weight loss? It might be time for a body detox.

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Summer Food & Drinks by May Ram

Peach and Mint Iced Tea You don't have to add any sugar to this drink.

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8 Homemade Detox Smoothies

7. Slim Down Detox Smoothie   Losing weight and detoxing go hand-in-hand, and this smoothie will make sure that you’re getting.

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10 Places Around The World Where You... by May Ram

Laghetto di Fanghi Mud Bath Vulcano Island, Italy Not as widely known as Etna, Vesuvius, or Stromboli, Vulcano Island can pride itself on being the location of radioactive mud baths. Thick and smelly, Laghetti di Fanghi are popular among Italians, who endure the inconveniences for the sake of their health benefits.

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10 Everyday Things Invented For Tota... by May Ram

Bubble Wrap Bubble wrap is that nylon-like polymer filled with air bubbles that everyone, or at least almost everyone, loves pressing. That popping sound that it makes gives us some form of satisfaction. Today, it is used to wrap items to prevent them from damage during handling and transportation, although it can also be used to save the life of someone suffering from hypothermia.

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10 Weirdest Ways Scientists Are Usin... by May Ram

Kitty Litter In February 2014, alarms rang out at a nuclear waste facility in New Mexico. A 55-gallon container of radioactive waste had burst open, releasing radioactivity into the air. It took a few months of investigation to uncover the culprit behind the accident: Someone had bought the wrong kind of kitty litter.

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10 Weirdest Ways Scientists Are... by user37749302

10 Weirdest Ways Scientists Are Using Everyday Things YULIYA GEIKHMAN JULY 11, 2015 Your house is full of everyday objects that you only use for one, maybe two things. You’ve probably never looked at a tampon and wondered, “What else could I possibly use this for?” At least, we assume you’ve never done that. Part of the job of a scientist is to constantly question assumptions, look at things from different angles, and find new uses for old things. The result is the use of household objects in some creative ways. 10Gelatin

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All About Gelatin

Gelatin Gelatin or gelatine, is a substance derived from the processing of animal collagen. Commercially, this is most typically obtained from cattle hides and bones and pigskins. Contrary to popular belief, it is not rendered from the feet or horns of animals, which are made primarily of keratin rather than collagen. In its most basic form, commercially processed edible gelatin is a tasteless beige or pale yellow powder or granules. It is composed of mostly protein, with a small percentage of mineral salts and water making up the balance. Gelatin contains 18amino acids. Of the ten essential amino acids necessary for human health, it lacks only tryptophan.

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Delicious & Healthy

Delicious & Healthy 5 SATISFYING VEGAN RICE DISHES BY ROSE Y. COLÓN-SINGH ON MAY 18, 2015 Looking for easy but satisfying vegan rice dishes? You'll love these tasty combinations featuring everything from the smoky flavors of the American Southwest and alluring spices of India to the umami-rich ingredients of Asia. There's even a comforting vegan rice dessert inspired by the tropics. Take a look:

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10 Strange Architectural Concepts Of... by May Ram

Breathable Metal Due to the constantly decreasing supply of fossil fuels and the constant worsening of our environment, many architects are increasingly looking for new ways to make buildings more energy-efficient. Energy-efficiency architects are most interested in the effective heating and cooling of buildings.

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10 Hypothetical Forms Of Life

Von Neumann Probes Machine-based artificial life is a common idea, almost trite, so we’ll focus on the fascinating Von Neumann probes for the purposes of this article. They were first envisioned by mid-20th-century Hungarian mathematician and futurist John Von Neumann, who believed that in order to replicate the functions of the human brain, a machine would require self-control and self-repair mechanisms. He came up with the idea of creating self-replicating machines, based on observations of how life increases in complexity through replication. He believed that such machines should have some kind of universal constructor, which would allow them to not only build replicas of themselves but also potentially improved or altered versions, allowing forevolution and increased complexity over time.

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8 Detox Water Recipes to Flush Your ... by May Ram

Cucumber Lemon Mint Detox Water (aka Sassy Water)   Cucumbers are one of the most hydrating vegetables because they’re mostly made up of water. Many detox programs include cucumbers

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Zen Music by May Ram

Gentle Stream

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10 Bizarre Quirks Of Ocean Life Caug... by May Ram

Swimming Through The Silversides   "Devil’s Grotto” is a dark name for a beautiful place. Located in Grand Cayman, the intricate maze of stone tunnels and reefs is one of the most popular dive locations in the Caribbean. It’s not hard to see why—the place is an underwater wonderland of vibrant coral, glittering fish, and twisted geological formations that look like they’ve sprung straight from the primeval palette of time itself, all of it top-lit by a bluish haze of sunlight so soft you could die in it.

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Love to Remember

Love Heartbreaking: Final moments of lovers pictured dying in each other's arms after 75 years of marriage 10:22, 3 JULY 2015 BY JAMIE LEWIS Jeanette Toczko held husband Alexander saying 'You died in my arms and I love you. I love you, wait for me, I'll be there soon'.

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10 Unsolved Desert Mysteries

Spider Art A broken but unique piece of art was discovered in Egypt’s western desert. A sheet of sandstone in the Kharga Oasis 175 kilometers (108 mi) west of Luxor depicts what could be the only known spider rock art from the Old World.

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10 Obscure Tales From Hiroshima And Nagasaki

The Hibakusha The hibakusha are the survivors of the atomic bombs. The term hibakushaliterally means “explosion-affected people.” A pressing matter for thehibakusha after the atomic bomb blasts was the discrimination they faced.

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10 Strange Tales Of Subterranean Civilization

Deep Earth Bystanders This intriguing and strange theory centers around the concept that the interior of the Earth is home to a race of isolationist aliens.

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Today I found out!

Today I found out! WHY CAN PEOPLE LIVE IN HIROSHIMA AND NAGASAKI NOW, BUT NOT CHERNOBYL? Why is it that Chernobyl is still toxic, but there are millions of people living in Hiroshima and Nagasaki without dying?

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10 Ancient Children’s Tales Told By ... by May Ram

The Mystery Of The Moose Geoglyph Photo credit: Google Earth In this story, our discovery of the past came from our curiosity about the future. Images taken from space in 2011 revealed a giant moose geoglyph in the Ural Mountains that’s believed to predate the famous Nazca Lines in Peru by thousands of years. The type of stonework, known as “lithic chipping,” suggests that this structure may have been built as long ago as 3000 or 4000 B.C.

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Forbidden Knowledge : Advanced Ancient Technology

Forbidden Knowledge : Advanced Ancient Technology Source The is clear evidence that the Ancient Egyptians used high level technology to construct pyramids and temples. Egyptologists look at the source of this power and its application in the ancient world. Is Our science is just beginning to grasp what the ancients clearly understood ?

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Farscape

"I, E.T."   A Peacekeeper beacon goes off and Moya has to land on an alien planet to prevent its signal being intercepted and Moya being discovered. Crichton, D'Argo and Aeryn leave Moya and explore the planet in search of a substance that can be used to numb Moya's senses so the beacon can be removed but Crichton gets separated from the group and meets up with some inhabitants of the planet who hide him from the authorities.

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10 Strange Stories From The Early Study Of Element

Fluorine’s Deadly Challenge The first observations of fluorine came from the 1500s, with a German mineralogist who described it as a material that served to lower the melting point of ore. In 1670, a glassworker accidentally found that fluorspar and acids would react and used the reaction to etch glass. Isolating fluorine proved much more difficult—and deadly.

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10 Creepy Hotel Mysteries That Are Still Unsolved

The Biltmore Hotel Hauntings Photo credit: Ebyabe During the 1920s, Thomas “Fatty” Walsh was a notable underworld figure from New York who ran most of his operations out of Florida. He was a frequent guest at the Biltmore Hotel in Coral Gables and often ran a speakeasy and casino out of his 13th-floor suite.

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10 ‘What If’ Scenarios About The Earth’s Geography

What If There Was No Gulf Stream? The Gulf Stream is the most important ocean current system in the northern hemisphere, stretching from Florida to northwestern Europe.

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10 Unusual States Of Matter

Jahn-Teller Metals Jahn-Teller Metals are the newest kid on the block of matter states, with researchers only successfully creating them for the first time in 2015. If confirmed by other labs, the experiment may change the world as we know it, since Jahn-Teller metals have properties of both an insulator and a superconductor.

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10 Scientific Names With Ridiculous Backstories

Agathidium Bushi Photo credit: cornell.edu In 2005, Cornell University entomologists discovered several new species of slime-mold beetles. In an effort to thank the Bush administration, the scientists named three of them after George Bush, Dick Cheney, and Donald Rumsfeld. Strangely, though, the naming was intended to be a compliment. Bush even personally thanked them for the honor, although one has to wonder if Bush realized the implications of saying, “Gee, I really appreciate you naming a disgusting, bottom-feeding insect after me.”

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10 Of The Oldest Discoveries Of Their Kind

Cheese 3,800 Years Old While the art of making cheese is certainly not new, finding old examples of cheese is rare. Mostly, we find fat residues suggesting that some artifacts once contained cheese. Time is not dairy’s friend, especially if we’re talking millennia. But excavations at China’s ancient Xiaohe Cemetery (aka “Ordek’s necropolis”) revealed pieces of 3,800-year-old cheese sitting on the chests and necks of several mummies.

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10 Really Impressive Achievements By... by May Ram

Kieron Williamson The art field is where we expect to find child prodigies because we’ve heard stories about people like Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, who was writing symphonies when he was four years old. But even among art prodigies, Williamson’s success stands out.

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10 Harrowing Tales Of Stateless People

Deepan Budlakoti As cases of statelessness go, Deepan Budlakoti’s is a legal oddity. No one disputes that he was born in Ottawa, Canada. Nobody questions whether his parents, Indian nationals who themselves eventually became Canadian citizens, were legally in the country when he was born. Budlakoti even received a Canadian birth certificate and a passport. Yet, according to the Canadian government, he not only isn’t a citizen, but he should be deported to a country which likewise refuses to claim him as its own.

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10 Mind-Blowing Examples Of Hypothetical Architect

Invisible Buildings With architecture, a supposedly good idea today could be considered hideous tomorrow. In the late 1940s, brutalism seemed like the stuff of the future. Today, it’s a style hated by just about everyone. One branch of hypothetical architecture proposes getting around this problem by making our buildings invisible.

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10 Ambitious Megastructures

The Netherlands’ Artificial Mountain With its liberal sex and drug laws, long life expectancy, and excellent beer, it can be tempting to think the Netherlands has it all. Dutch journalist Thijs Zonneveld disagrees. In 2011, he declared the one thing his low-lying countryneeded was a mountain. And he was going to make it his life’s mission to ensure it got one.

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Facebook by May Ram

  Facebook Pinterest ANIMALS  10 Savage Truths About Shark Attacks PETER RAMIREZ AUGUST 8, 2015 The subject of sharks elicits an almost primordial fear in most of us. Hollywood doesn’t do us any favors with inaccurate portrayals of sharks that provide false justification to our fears. Even TV programming that we think delivers facts in a somewhat scientific light can intentionally mislead us into considering something as improbable as a giant, prehistoric shark coming back to life. To say that shark myths abound would be a severe understatement. Finding material that does more than induce dread and anxiety, instead providing positive, accurate, and useful information about these remarkable animals, can be a venture in contradiction. Unfortunately, within all of the falsehoods projected about sharks, the modicums of truth are usually enough for us to cast away rational thought, instead giving full credibility to unsupported, third-hand accounts that are nearly always mistaken or distorted. With as much accuracy in mind as possible, here are 10 savagely true and exciting things about shark attacks. 10Conservation Efforts May Lead To Shark Attacks Ocean experts and professionals have been aware of increasing shark attacks in North America for several years now. In 2014, a report pointed to three possible causes for the recent surge of shark attacks in the US—global warming (allowing humans to spend more time in the sea), more humans going into the ocean anyway, and more sharks migrating to areas along both US coastlines.

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Bioengineering beta

Researchers Identify Potential 'Shield' Protein Against Alzheimer's Disease     Lawrence, KS (Scicasts) — A University of Kansas team has published a breakthrough investigation of a seemingly protective 'apolipoprotein' created by the ApoE gene -- a gene associated with Alzheimer's disease risk.

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10 Unsettling Tales Of Swarms Of Invasive Animals

Bats Infest A School In early 2015, the students at a charter school in New Orleans had their education disrupted because their school became infested by bats. While the nocturnal bats mostly stayed inside the walls during the day, the infestation became bad enough that some bats started to appear outside the walls, and school officials were worried about it making concentration difficult for their students. Of course, considering that bats are known for carrying many different diseases, it was also a considerable health risk.

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10 Facts That Will Change How You View Sharks

Sharks Are Not The Most Dangerous Predator In The Ocean For most people who grew up watching movies like Jaws or Sharknado, large sharks, such as the great white shark, are often seen as the apex predators of the ocean. No one usually thinks of a shark as prey. However, dolphins have long vied with sharks for supremacy in the ocean. Although a regular dolphin is no match for a great white shark, there is one species of dolphin that can make just about anything in the water swim for cover as fast as it can.

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Botanical World!

How Plants Deal With Space Travel OVER THE PAST few billion years, life has undergone stark transformations, from isolated organisms to collections of cells to inventive machines able to grow with sunlight to larger creatures that swim, crawl, and hop across the planet’s surface.  Along the way, increasingly pervasive organisms encountered a range of environments that challenged genetic codes to solve novel challenges posed by lower temperatures, more acidic waters, or higher salt concentrations.

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Deep Sea by May Ram

New Species, the ‘Ruby Seadragon,’ Discovered by Scripps Researchers Mysterious red fish emerges from museum collections A 3-D scan of the newly discovered Ruby Seadragon. While researching the two known species of seadragons as part of an effort to understand and protect the exotic and delicate fish, scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego made a startling discovery: A third species of seadragon.

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Places by May Ram

These  Places Are So Unbelievably Colorful… It’s Hard To Believe They’re Real. LUOPING, CHINA  VALLEY OF FLOWERS NATIONAL PARK, INDIA

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Green Architecture by May Ram

A bald eagle nest hovers above the Madison River in Yellowstone. 

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The Antikythera Shipwreck:

The Antikythera Shipwreck: the Ship , the Treasures, the Mechanism Source From April 5, 2012 to June 29, 2014, the exhibition "The Antikythera Shipwreck: the Ship , the Treasures, the Mechanism" will run at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens, Greece.

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10 Greatest Shipwreck Treasure Found

10 Greatest Shipwreck Treasure Found Black Swan « Gold Rush nuggets stolen from California courthouse Civil War graffiti preserved by dirt » Spain awarded $500 million “Black Swan” treasure In May of 2007,Odyssey Marine Exploration, a privately owned marine treasure-hunting company, discovered a Spanish shipwreck somewhere on the Atlantic seabed.

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10 Weird Ways Cats Have Been Venerated Through His

Tokyo’s Cat Temple The Japanese really, really love their cats. In the 18th century, the maneki neko, little white cat effigies with upraised paws, were created to bring prosperity to shop owners and noodle weavers alike. Just like China’s opaque wall of smog, this endearing Japanese character has gradually swept through mainland Asia.

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14 Radical Skyscrapers That Are More Than Just Bui

Launchspire by Henry Smith, Adam Woodward, Paul Attkins Designed to lessen our dependence on jet fuel, this tower uses an electromagnetic accelerator to launch planes, like a massive stationary slingshot:

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Nature & Facts

Nine Incredible Facts About Nature’s Greatest Home Architects 1) Even though the bird itself is about the size of a sparrow and is rather common-looking, the biggest nests are built by the weaver bird, which lives in the southern part of Africa. Using twigs and the occasional bits of cotton or feathers, these nests can house a hundred pairs of birds and take over entire trees– or telephone poles–with hanging baskets.

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10 Attempts At Creating Perpetual Motion Technolog

Joe Newman’s Energy Machine Photo credit: Kmarinas86 In 1911, the US Patent Office issued something of a blanket decree. They would no longer issue patents for perpetual motion or free energy devices because it appeared to be scientifically impossible to create such a thing. For some inventors, that meant that their battle to get their work recognized by legitimate science was going to be a bit more difficult.

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10 Recent Developments In Human Health You Probabl

A Possible Cure For Parkinson’s Disease In 2014, scientists took artificial—but fully functioning—human neurons and successfully grafted them to the brains of mice. The neurons have the potential to treat or even cure diseases such as Parkinson’s disease.

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10 Incredible Astronomical Instruments That Existe

Nebra Sky Disk Photo credit: Dbachmann Named for the German town where it was discovered in 1999, the Nebra sky disk is the oldest depiction of the cosmos ever found. It had been buried alongside a chisel, two axes, two swords, and two arm rings.

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10 Heroic Acts Of Bravery That Involved Disobeying

10 Heroic Acts Of Bravery That Involved Disobeying A Direct Order JONATHAN H. KANTOR SEPTEMBER 13, 2015 In the military, personnel are taught to always obey the lawful orders of those placed in positions of command over them. In turn, military commanders are taught the weight of those orders and how they can either save soldiers’ lives or lose them.

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10 DARPA Projects That Could Change The World

Jazz Robots We’ve had artificial intelligence programs that can produce their own music for a few years now. They work by analyzing the output of human composers, noting the similar characteristics, and producing pseudo-original pieces based on this analysis.

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10 Weird Solutions To Challenging Space Problems

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10 Weird Solutions To Challenging Sp... by May Ram

Ants In Space Ants in Space is not the long-awaited sequel to Snakes on a Plane. An established ISS fixture and phonetic mouthful, the Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus Science Insert (CSI-06 program), or cosmic ant colony, will help scientists develop more efficient algorithms to revolutionizerobotics and AI industries.

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10 Sci-Fi Technologies Moving To Immortality

Printing New Hearts We’ve already gone over the monumental impact that heart disease has on the lives of humanity, as well as the importance of organ transplants to keep people alive.

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10 Amazing Medical Breakthroughs Made By Teenagers

Elana Simon As a child, Elana Simon of New York suffered from horrible stomach aches. She went to a number of specialists, but no one was sure what was wrong until she was 12 years old. That was when she was diagnosed with fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma, a rare form of liver cancer.

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Absurd Creature of the Week:

Absurd Creature of the Week: The Curious Case of the Elusive, Slimy Nautilus ASIDE FROM LOSING a $20,000 camera, by most measures July’s hunt for the ultra-rare crusty nautilus was a rousing success. The camera was stuck 1,000 feet deep when Rick Hamilton at last pulled up Allonautilus scrobiculatus in a cage off the coast of Manus Island in Papua New Guinea. And so he grabbed his GoPro and leaped into the water, capturing the first-ever video of a live crusty nautilus, a creature that human eyes haven’t glimpsed since 1984. It was a beauty, and it was…really slimy. And not to tell nautiluses their business, but they aren’t supposed to be really slimy.

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iOS

iOS   How to Downgrade to iOS 8 from iOS 9 CRAIG LLOYD 09/16/2015 iiOS 9 was released today, but if you’re not a big fan of the new update, here’s how to downgrade to iOS 8 to get the old version back. Apple announced and unveiled iOS 9 back in June during the company’s Worldwide Developers Conference where it showed off some of the cool new features of the new version of iOS. It keeps the same overall look and feel of iOS 8, but comes with a handful of new features and improvements.

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10 Astonishing Cave Formations

Boxwork Boxwork gets its name from its visual similarity to the corrugated walls of a cardboard box. Unlike speleothems, which are created by precipitation or evaporation, boxwork is a speleogen formed by erosion or dissolution of the rock.

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News by May Ram

News SYRIAN GIRL, 9, FOUND DROWNED IN SWIMMING POOL Posted on Sep 22, 2015 by Janene Van Jaarsveldt

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10 Haunting Anonymous Confession Letters To Unsolv

The Death Of Larry Bradley On December 2, 2014, Larry Bradley was hunting outside Morgan Township, Ohio. At about 8:30 AM, he called his wife and said that he needed help, and then she heard him gasping for air. The police arrived on scene, and they found Bradley dead in a tree stand. He had been shot in the back.

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10 Awe-Inspiring Buildings You Won’t Believe We To

Grand Country Houses England Photo credit: Francis Orpen Morris Although the era of upper-class privilege may have ended long ago, many of us still have a mental picture of England as something out of Downton Abbey. But if you go looking for these rural idylls, you’ll be in for a shock. As many as one-third of Britain’s country houses were blown up during the 20th century.

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10 Mysteries With Major Deve

The Identity Of ‘Benjaman Kyle’ One of the most mysterious amnesia cases of all time involved an individual known as “Benjaman Kyle.” On August 31, 2004, an unconscious nude man who appeared to be in his fifties was found in a dumpster behind a Burger King in Richmond, Georgia. It appeared that he had been struck on the head with a blunt object, and he had no memory of anything that happened and did not even remember his own name. Doctors determined that he was suffering from retrograde amnesia. Since he was found near a Burger King, the man decided to use the “B.K.” initials to select a new name for himself—Benjaman Kyle.

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10 Proposed Solutions To The Problems Of Interstel

Self-Replicating Spacecraft Anything that we build and send out into space is obviously going to have its problems, and making things that need to last for millions of miles without burning out or breaking down seems like a pretty impossible obstacle, but the answer might have been stumbled upon decades ago. In the 1940s, physicist John von Neumann proposed a mechanical technology that could replicate itself, and while he didn’t apply the idea to interstellar travel, those after him started to look that way. The resulting von Neumann probes could, in theory, be used to explore vast, interstellar territories. According to some researchers, the idea that we’re the first to think of this idea is not only rather pompous of us, but it’s pretty unlikely, too.

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10 Weird About Ourselves From Genetics

Genetic Adam And Eve According to the Bible, the man and woman who started it all were, of course, Adam and Eve. Geneticists agree with this. Sort of. The people deemed Adam and Eve by geneticists are the two people whose DNA has survived even into today. In 1987, geneticists sampled a handful of people and described what they called a “molecular clock,” charting the evolution of DNA and determining that all the people sampled shared a common ancestor. This Eve, they said, continues to prosper through her mitochondrial DNA and lived in the flesh about 200,000 years ago somewhere in Africa.

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Growing Fuchsia Flower – Care Of Fuchsias

Fuchsias Doesn’t Bloom: What To Do When A Fuchsia Plant Is Not Blooming      Image by Maja Dumat By Nikki Phipps (Author of The Bulb-o-licious Garden) Many times when we bring fuchsia plants home from the store, they are loaded with their fairy-like blossoms. After a few weeks, the number of blossoms on your fuchsia starts to decline, then one day, no fuchsia blooms. Don’t worry; this is a common occurrence with fuchsia, but one that can usually be easily fixed. Keep reading to learn what to do for how to get fuchsia to blossom beautifully again.

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10 Crazy Facts About Crocodilians

The Strange And Endangered Mini-Alligators Of China Photo credit: Greg Hume China is home to the second, and much less familiar, of the world’s only two alligator species. While crocodiles are highly diverse at 14 species, alligator biodiversity is much lower. The Chinese alligator is a remarkable animal, well-documented in Chinese history as a species that is essentially harmless to humans but unusually well-protected against predators.

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Roses by May Ram

HisHistory and Meaning of Roses and their Colorstory and Meaning of Orange Rose With suggestions of fire, citrus and glowing sunsets, orange roses make the perfect summertime bloom. Unique and vibrant, these tangerine blossoms have a way of bringing an invigorating energy to any joyful summer occasion. The perfect mix of contemporary and classic, this relatively new rose variety is a gift that is sure to light up someone’s day. What is the Meaning of Orange Roses?

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Top 10 Most Polluted Places

Kabwe, Zambia The second largest city in this southern African country was home to one of the world’s largest lead smelters until 1987. As a result, the entire city is contaminated with the heavy metal, which can cause brain and nerve damage in children and fetuses. “Measurements of children’s blood levels of lead average over 50 micrograms per deciliter and some were over 100,” Fuller (from the Blacksmith Institute) says. “For every 10 points above 10 micrograms per deciliter [(the U.S. Centers for Disease Control standard for treatment)] that your blood level goes up, your IQ drops.”

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10 Soviet Space Firsts That Got Buried In The Hist

First Spacecraft To Photograph The Dark Side Of The Moon Photo credit: NASA, OKB-1 Launched on October 4, 1959, Luna 3 was the third spacecraft successfully launched to the Moon. Unlike the previous two Luna probes, Luna 3 carried a camera to take pictures of the far side of the Moon, which had never been photographed at that time.

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10 Ridiculous Instances Of Zero Tolerance In Schoo

A Boy Is Suspended For His Cub Scout Knife In 2009, six-year-old Cub Scout Zachary Christie was suspended for bringing his Cub Scout knife (a utensil that also featured a fork and a spoon) to school.

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10 Unnecessary Fears People Had Of Everyday Things

Telephones The invention of the telephone in 1876 was met with enthusiasm and confusion, as many people did not know what exactly it was meant for. AT&T and Bell, the first telephone companies in the United States, initially promoted the telephone as a business tool,

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10 Bizarre Aspects Of The Indigo Children Movement

Indigo Categories Photo credit: Warner Brothers Television via Amazon By 1999, Tappe was claiming that Indigos could be categorized into four basic types: Humanist, Conceptual, Artist, and Inter-dimensional or Catalyst.

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10 Bizarre Aspects Of The Indigo Chi... by May Ram

10 Bizarre Aspects Of The Indigo Children Movement In the 1970s, self-described psychic Nancy Ann Tappe claimed that she had identified “Indigo children,” a breed of children that supposedly possessed indigo auras. Since then, other people have jumped on the bandwagon, combining reasonably good educational techniques with unwise medical choices and a truly bizarre worldview. Featured image credit: Magenta Pixie via YouTube 10Nancy Ann Tappe Photo credit: Janet13x via YouTube Nancy Ann Tappe claimed to have synesthesia (where the stimulation of one sense triggers another), which supposedly let her perceive human auras. Initially, she identified 11 distinct colors of auras.

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10 Doomed Attempts To Militarize Outer Space

The Almaz Program Like the US MOL program, the Almaz program was the Soviet Union’s attempt to militarize manned spaceflight at the height of the Cold War. The Almaz program actually had several manned missions and returned useful surveillance footage. To disguise the nature of the program, the launches of the Almaz space stations took place within the civilian Salyut space station program.

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10 Obsolete Scientific Theories That Didn’t Go Wit

Le Sage’s Theory Of Gravity Georges-Louis Le Sage saw a problem with the whole idea of gravity. Although gravity was understood to apply to the entire universe, Le Sage didn’t see how Newton’s widely accepted theory could account for the force of attraction between two masses separated by immense distances in space. He developed his own theory, and although it’s been largely debunked, there are still some scientists who hold onto the idea today.

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10 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Albert Ei

10 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Albert Einstein ELIZABETH S. ANDERSON OCTOBER 12, 2015 Most people agree that Albert Einstein was one of the greatest scientists who ever lived. As with many famous people, however, some interesting facts about his life have been distorted or forgotten over time. When digging a little deeper into his life, we found some nuggets that prove Einstein still has the capacity to surprise and even amaze us. There’s also a bonus entry with the “Einstein Puzzle” to test your intelligence. You don’t need to know physics or have a college degree. Just figure out who owns the fish . . . and discover if you’re part of the supposed 2 percent who can solve the puzzle. 10His Authorship Of The Theory Of General Relativity Was Disputed Photos via Wikimedia and Wikimedia The discovery of the theory of general relativity is surrounded by serious but little-known allegations of plagiarism by Albert Einstein, German scientist David Hilbert, and their respective supporters. It all started when Hilbert claimed that he had come up with the theory of general relativity first and that his work had been copied by Einstein without due credit. Einstein denied the accusations, saying it was Hilbert who had copied some of Einstein’s earlier papers.

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15 Fascinating Planets Outside Our Solar System

Gas Giant in “Habitable Zone” Gliese 876 b (June 23, 1998) The habitable zone is the imaginary spherical shell surrounding a star where conditions are optimal for liquid water to exist on an Earth-sized planet orbiting within that shell. This gas giant is special because it orbits inside its sun’s habitable zone.

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17 best plants for cool-season color

17 best plants for cool-season color Great plants for fall and winter color Cool-season flowers bring a splash of color to your garden right when you need it most. Where freezes are infrequent, you can plant cheery pansies (pictured), snapdragons, English daisies, and more from early fall through late winter. They'll overwinter, filling your borders, containers, and pocket gardens with months of flower power. In cold climates, plants will die off in winter but can be planted again in spring.

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Jasmine by May Ram

Jasmine Growing Jasmine Indoors: Care Of Indoor Jasmine Plants   Image by Katherine By Becca Badgett (Co-author of How to Grow an EMERGENCY Garden) If winter blooms and sweet, nighttime fragrance appeal to your senses,

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10 Real-Life Explanations For Famous Myths And Cry

Jason’s Golden Fleece Alluvial Mining Photo credit: USGS Jason of Greek mythology is the rightful king of Iolcus, who is sent on an impossible mission to retrieve a golden fleece by his usurping uncle Pelias. So he fits out his ship, the Argo, and sails to retrieve the fleece from Colchis,

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10 Weird Things We’ve Learned About The Mind And C

Even Our Brains Can’t Understand Our Dreams Picture the scene. You’re just chilling out, reading another brilliant article on your favorite list-based website, when suddenly the screen turns into butterflies, each of which has the screaming head of your mother. In most cases, this would send you sprinting out the door.

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10 Outlandish Early Flying Machines

Sikorsky Ilya Muromets Photo via Wikimedia Say what you will about Russian engineering, but history has shown that when it comes to making big military airplanes, the Russians sure know how to do it.

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10 Ghosts And Legends Of The Ohio River Valley

Willard Library Ghost Built in 1885, Evansville’s Willard Library is the oldest public library in Indiana. It is also the first library to install a “ghost cam” due to the recurring appearance of “The Grey Lady,” an apparition first seen in 1937.

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10 Bizarre Conspiracy Theories About Secret Govern

Men In Black When most people think of the men in black, or MIB, they think of a wisecracking Will Smith giving attitude to everyone around him just before he flashes them with a red light.

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10 Examples Of Nonbinary Genders Throughout Histor

The Kathoeys Of Thailand Photo via Wikimedia While many of the third-gendered people on this list are not commonly known, the kathoeys (or “ladyboys”) of Thailand are often mentioned in pop culture. 

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10 Of The Biggest Things In The Universe

The Laniakea Supercluster Photo credit: R. Brent Tully via NASA Galaxies tend to group together in clusters. Regions where clusters are more densely packed than the universal average are called superclusters. Previously, astronomers mapped these objects by their physical locations in the universe, but a recent study has found a new way of mapping the local universe, one that is shedding light on its unknown corners.

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10 Insane Architectural Crimes You Won’t Believe N

Thomas Willson’s Pyramid Of Death It sounds like something from a creepy sci-fi film. A vast, forbidding pyramid looming 94 floors over a storm-lashed metropolis. Inside, winding catacombs lead through endless chambers of the dead. Bodies upon bodies, stacked high into the heavens. Five million dead, all crammed into this one spooky space. In 19th-century London, this morbid vision nearly became a reality.

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10 Strange Wolf And Werewolf Panics From History

10 Strange Wolf And Werewolf Panics From History BENJAMIN WELTON OCTOBER 23, 2015   With their large, sharp teeth and frightening howls, it’s easy to imagine wolves as monstrous adversaries. Even though wolf-on-human attacks are incredibly rare, many people remain fearful of wolves, including the fictional variety known as “werewolves” (humans who turn into wolves when the Moon is full). During the Middle Ages and the early modern period, suspected werewolves were put on trial like witches and often tortured into confessing that they had received their wolfskins and special ointments from Satan. Many of these older werewolves were actually serial killers who possessed an animalistic ferocity. Others were rural lunatics who lived outside of their villages or towns. Either way, wolves and werewolves have caused major panics throughout history. 10Wolves Of Paris 

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10 Overlooked Women Who Outdid Famous Men

Babe Ruth vs. Jackie Mitchell Jackie Mitchell became one of the first professional female baseball players when she sensationally signed for the minor league Chattanooga Lookouts in 1931. Mitchell’s career playing alongside the men on the team didn’t last long—her contract was voided after a few days, probably at the instigation of baseball commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis, who labeled women playing baseball a disgraceful “burlesque”—but she still made history by striking out two of the greatest players in history on the same day.

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10 Fascinating Insights Into The World Of Blindnes

Universal Body Language We often rely on body language for everyday communication. But it’s difficult to know whether it’s a skill we learn from others or one we have from birth. To find out, researchers from the University of British Columbia and San Francisco State University took a look at how different cultures express different emotions—like happiness and shame—through body language. While part of their study analyzed athletes who were

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10 Fascinating Insights Into The Wor... by May Ram

10 Fascinating Insights Into The World Of Blindness DEBRA KELLY OCTOBER 25, 2015 Most of us can’t imagine life without sight. Worsening eyesight is one of the curses of age, and some know nothing different. They’ve been blind since birth. Still, there have been some amazing findings on the science and psychology of blindness. 10Deja Vu

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10 Strange Theoretical Stars

Thorne-Zytkow Object In 1977, Kip Thorne and Anna Zytkow published a paper detailing a new type of star called a Thorne-Zytkow Object (TZO). A TZO is a hybrid star formed by the collision between a red supergiant and a small, dense neutron star. Since a red supergiant is an extremely large star, the neutron star would take hundreds of years to just breach its inner atmosphere. As it continues to burrow into the star, the orbital center (called the barycenter) of the two stars will move toward the center of the supergiant. Eventually, the two stars will merge, causing a large supernova and eventually a black hole.

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10 Attempts To Scientifically Explore Religious Co

Virgin Birth The miracle of the virgin birth of Jesus is an important part of Christian belief, and most assume it was simply the divine work of God. Others, however, have tried to develop scientific explanations (beyond the idea that Joseph and Mary lied about engaging in sexual intercourse). The main question is where did Jesus get the Y chromosome that made Him male?

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10 Stages In The Evolution Of Vampire Lore

Draugr The Norse draugr are a more powerful form of revenant, and they represent an evolutionary path that vampire lore could have taken. Draugr possess immense strength and magical abilities such as shape-shifting, weather control, and seeing into the future. They live in their barrows, greedily guarding the treasures within. Unlike revenants, draugr are not confined to a helpless sleep during the day.

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10 Surprising Things Vulnerable To Hackers

Smart Homes With the smart home industry in its infancy, a lot of the technology just isn’t up to modern cybersecurity standards. In 2015, a security company tested 16 home automation devices and found only one that they couldn’t easily hack. Things like cameras and thermostats lacked the most basic security measures. It’s worrisome for a number of reasons, including cybercriminals using your patterns of behavior to put your safety at risk.

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10 Modern Inventions That Are Older Than We Think

10 Modern Inventions That Are Older Than We Think ELIZABETH S. ANDERSON OCTOBER 28, 2015 Many modern inventions have actually been around in one form or another for decades or even centuries. We tend to think these things are new because the earlier versions were either failures, forgotten, or lost. 10Reality-Based Television Shows 

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10 Modern Mystics Who Channeled Strange Spirits

Benjamin Creme Born in Scotland in 1922, Benjamin Creme is a modernist painter who became interested in esoteric philosophy from a young age, particularly the works of Helena Blavatsky and Alice Bailey. He came to believe in the existence of Masters of Wisdom, custodians of the Divine Plan for the planet Earth. In 1959, he claims to have been contacted by one such master, calling himself Maitreya, the World Teacher. In 1972, Creme began training to prepare the world for the return of the World Teacher, who is supposed to be the one destined to return in many cultural traditions: Christ, Messiah, Imam Mahdi, Krishna, and Maitreya Buddha.

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Terrifying Tales Of The Ancient Ghosts

The Roman Manes Photo credit: Jastrow In ancient Rome, tombstones that bore Latin inscriptions often included the words dis manibus, meaning “to the divine manes.” The manes are thought to date back to the earliest beginnings of the Roman Empire. Although there are numerous mentions of them throughout Roman texts, they’re somewhat hard to define because religious beliefs kept shifting. Originally believed to be the spirits of deified ancestors, the manes were something between ghost and god.

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Top 10 Discoveries Of Ancient Scotland

Top 10 Discoveries Of Ancient Scotland JANA LOUISE SMIT OCTOBER 31, 2015 Scotland is one of the few places that always provides us with great archaeological discoveries. From unique artifacts and mysterious ruins, we’ve received new insights into ancient Scotland and its inhabitants. 10The Lewis Chessmen

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10 Hard-Core Hybrids Formed By mating Among Three

The Swan-Snow-Barnacle Goose Photo credit: Cephas When a swan and a snow goose pair up, the result is a swan-snow hybrid. This is a rare event. It’s even more unusual for one of these hybrids to pair with a third species, the barnacle goose, to make a triple hybrid.

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10 Cosmic Misconceptions About Outer Space

The Moon’s Effect On Tides One of the most common misconceptions regarding space is how our oceans’ tides work. Most people understand that they are affected by the Moon, and this is largely true. But many people are also mistakenly under the impression that the Moon is the only force acting on them.

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10 Fascinating Egyptian Structures That Aren’t Pyr

Malkata Palace Photo credit: Markh When Amenhotep III ruled Egypt, he built a palace that was the ancient Egyptian version of a California mansion. He was only 12 when he inherited the throne from his father, Thutmose IV, along with one of the largest, wealthiest empires in the world. Rather than wage war, Amenhotep III was a man of diplomacy and peace, which left him the time and money to build Malkata Palace.

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10 Fascinating But Forgotten Women From American H

Anita Corsini Married Zulu Charlie Photo credit: New York Herald Anita Corsini was an Italian immigrant who came to Brooklyn when she was 14. Her father made display cases for a living, and Anita helped out by working as a piano teacher.

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Keeping Flowers Blooming!

Keeping Flowers Blooming! How To keep your Pansies looking Full and Flowering all season long!

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8 Plants to keep in your bedroom for... by May Ram

2. Lavender Lavender – James Lavender is one of man’s common natural remedies for many things, it is used as a fragrance for soaps,

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10 Unreal Tales Of Childbirth

An Unusually Long Wait If television and film have taught us anything, it’s that when a pregnant woman’s water breaks, a squealing infant is just around the corner. But there was nothing speedy or intuitive about Gideon Whitchurch when he was born. His parents had suffered through five years of miscarriages and unfulfilled hopes to conceive him. Then, just 28 weeks into the pregnancy, his mother’s water broke, and Gideon kept the eager parents waiting once again for an extremely long time—over a month.

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Ways to Keep My Mind in Peace and My soul in innoc

Ways to Keep My Mind in Peace and My soul in innocence! This is very beautiful is helping me repair my body soul and mind and I feel one with all when hear this.

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Hidden Music By Rumi

My Burning Heart - Bittersweet In my hallucination  I saw my beloved's flower garden  In my vertigo, in my dizziness  In my drunken haze  Whirling and dancing like a spinning wheel

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10 Unsettling Mysteries From Asylums And Instituti

Who’s Buried In The Numbered Graves Of Letchworth Village? Photo credit: Doug Kerr Letchworth Village was a New York asylum that opened in 1911. Until 1967, those who died there were buried in unmarked graves in a nearby cemetery in the woods. All but forgotten, these people have only rows of numbered steel markers to acknowledge their lost lives. A second cemetery was opened in 1967 that did mark the burial places of the newly dead.

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10 Fascinating But Forgotten Men From American His

Kurt Chew-Een Lee The First Asian-American Marine Officer In 1946, Kurt Chew-Een Lee made history by becoming the first Asian-American officer in the Marine Corps. But that’s just scratching the surface of his amazing story. Born in 1926, Lee joined the Marines in 1944. At first, his job was teaching Japanese, but by the time the Korean War rolled around, he was a first lieutenant leading his own machine gun platoon. Despite his insignia, Lee faced quite a bit of discrimination from his troops, some of whom disparagingly referred to him as a “Chinese laundryman.”

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10 Ways Our Ancestors Killed Themselves In The Nam

X-Ray Hair Removal Before the invention of the X-ray, our grandmas used electrolysis, which was a slow, ineffective, painful, costly, and—most importantly—safe method of removing hair from their faces. The X-ray was the exact opposite: It was fast, effective, painless, cheap, and deadly.

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10 Intriguing Legendary Amazons

Beauty Secrets We tend to visualize Amazons as rough and unfeminine, with little interest in how they looked as they roamed the steppes. Herodotus, however, said that the Scythians, both men and women, were as concerned with grooming and beauty as anyone.

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10 Intriguing Kepler Space Telescope Discoveries

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10 Intriguing Kepler Space Telescope... by May Ram

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10 Intriguing Kepler Space

The Super-Earth Orbiting An Orange Dwarf When the Kepler space telescope suffered its critical malfunction a few years ago, many people were convinced that its mission had ended. However, the telescope came back to life, proving its usefulness by locating a planet unlike any in our solar system.

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10 Secret Countries You’ve Probably Never Heard Of

Abkhazia Photo via Wikimedia Commons What makes a nation? Abkhazia has a distinct ethnic population, borders based on historical boundaries, its own military, a functioning government, a national bank, its own passports, and recognition from at least four UN member nations (Russia, Nicaragua, Venezuela, and Nauru). Yet, to over 90 percent of the world, it remains a province of Georgia, the country it broke away from in a devastating 1992–1993 war.

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10 Revealing Facts About The Katana

The Blade Is Just One Part Of A Sword’s Value Photo credit: Samuraiantiqueworld Even a damaged sword by a famous smith is worth more than a pristine blade of inferior quality. Blades by the most famous smiths are national treasures and are considered priceless. But while the blade is usually the most integral part, other parts of a sword also play a large role in determining a sword’s value. A swordsmith makes the blade, but other craftsmen make the other parts. Most important for collectors is the tsuba (the decorative hand guard), which is sometimes just as valuable as the blade. A tsuba can be worth tens of thousands of dollars. Scabbards, mounts, and decorations are also made by different craftsmen. Even these parts of the sword can command high prices at auctions. As a result, having a complete sword is critical to its value. A missing guard will devalue a sword by 10 percent. A sword without a scabbard will lose 30 percent of its value.

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10 Theories About How Biology Creates A Criminal

The Criminal Brain As A Legal Defense The number of criminals using their brain scans to lighten their sentences has skyrocketed in recent years. Between 2007 and 2011, the number of cases in which judges mentioned neuroscientific evidence increased from 112 to 1,500.

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10 Radical Ideas To Colonize Our Solar System

Bolo Habitats In 1975, NASA conducted a study on the feasibility of different “free-space” habitats, colonies that weren’t tethered to any particular body. One of the designs they looked at was so simple that it could have been implemented right then—the bolo habitat.

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6 ways to expand storage on your iPhone 6

6 ways to expand storage on your iPhone 6 By Chuong Nguyen May 06, 2015Mobile phones   Make your iPhone grow with you Now that the iPhone 6 and the iPhone 6 Plus have been on the market for well over half a year, users will have had ample time to fill their device's storage. As your collection of music, movies, videos, photos, apps and files grow on your iPhone, you may find yourself wanting a more expensive model configured with even more storage capacity. Rather than trading in your existing 16GB iPhone for a larger one with 64GB or 128GB of storage, here are six ways to alleviate your storage woes: 1. BYO-storage with a wireless media streamer Mobile wireless media streamers are portable devices that operate on battery power and can serve as a wireless drive for your iPhone.

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10 Facts About Fungi That Will Astound You

Ancient Monstrosities About 350 million years ago when insects ruled the land and vertebrates had yet to crawl out of the oceans, the world was a strange, alien place. There were forests of large, branchless growths 6 meters (20 ft) tall and 1 meter (3 ft) wide. For years, scientists thought that these growths were primitive trees, but we now know that they were fungi called Prototaxites.

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10 Biggest Annoyances Of Human Existence

Bones and Teeth Breaking So this ultra-tough material that holds up our bodies can still break and, due to being tied to our nervous system, hurts like a hell when broken? Lame. Plus, it’s a squeamish sight to see and it makes a person vulnerable to all kinds of infection, or just emotional pain.

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10 Awesome Animals You Don’t Expect To Find In Aus

Quokka You may have seen these ridiculously cute marsupials when they caught some viral fame for their selfie photobombs in late 2014. One of the smallest species of wallaby, quokkas are a vulnerable species whose mainland populations have been decimated by predators such as dingoes and foxes as well as by habitat loss from human development.

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10 Fascinating Proposed Tou

10 Fascinating Proposed Tou.rist Traps ZACHERY BRASIER NOVEMBER 22, 2015 Tourism is a great source of income for every developed country. While we know all about the many tourist traps that ended up being built, most people haven’t heard of these crazy proposals. 10Michael Jackson’s Laser Robot

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10 Mysterious Flying Objects From The Turn Of The

Swimming White Horse According to an 1878 article in the The New York Times, the Cincinnati Commercial had reported that a bizarre telegram had been received from a correspondent in Parkersburg, Virginia, reporting that a local farmer had seen a strange creature in the sky while plowing his field.

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10 Extraordinary Diaries Of Relatively Ordinary Pe

10 Extraordinary Diaries Of Relatively Ordinary People DEBRA KELLY NOVEMBER 23, 2015 Most people have read at least parts of Anne Frank’s diary. A candid look into the life of a regular young girl during one of the most turbulent times in recent history, her words have lived on long past her, putting a face to the suffering of millions. While she’s certainly the most well-known example, she’s not the only one who has recorded thoughts, dreams, and days in a diary that has gone on to be an extraordinarily important historical document. 10Florence Wolfson

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10 Theoretical Countries Of The Future

Catalonia Photo credit: Kippelboy Catalonia is a region of Spain that has been given increased autonomy over the years, especially after the death of General Francisco Franco in 1975. The Catalans are different from the Spaniards in that they speak a different language, have different cultural traditions, and have a history independent of Spain. Centered around the city of Barcelona, the Catalans have pushed hard for independence over the past few years.

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10 Insane Ancient Weapons You’ve Never Heard Of

Whirlwind Catapult Photo via Wikimedia Catapults are the age-old war machines, and like modern rifles, there was a different kind for every purpose. While films have shown us the wall punchers and beast machines used by Greek and Roman armies, the Chinese devised a smaller version that could strike important targets with pinpoint accuracy: the xu

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10 Lost Treasures And The Awesome Ways We’re Getti

Music From Ancient Greece Until recently, music was one of the most ephemeral art forms. With no recording equipment, the great singers of the ancient world had no choice but to let their words vanish into the ether.

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10 Times Our History Was Destroyed By Accidents An

Greenpeace Destroys Part Of The Nazca Lines In the Peruvian desert, Greenpeace activists hiked to the site of one of the Nazca lines to protest nonrenewable energy. Their plan was to unfurl a message in bright yellow letters—“Time for Change! The future is renewable”—beside one of the famous ancient images. Then they flew a drone over the area to capture their message on film.

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10 Reasons Aliens Probably Don’t Look Like Us

They Don’t Need Water Photo credit: Ittiz As mentioned above, water is another universal requirement for all life on Earth. Water is necessary because it exists in a liquid form across a large temperature range, is an effective solvent, acts as a transport mechanism, and enables chemical reactions to take place.

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10 Epic Tales From The Golden Age Of Pirates

10 Epic Tales From The Golden Age Of Pirates MATT MARTIN DECEMBER 2, 2015 They sailed to the Caribbean seeking fortune. Some were soldiers out of work, others were privileged thrill-seekers, and one was a poor sailor hoping to win his girlfriend’s hand in marriage. Yet of the world’s famous pirates mentioned below, all but one suffered a cruel death, whether hanging from the end of a rope, drowned at the bottom of the sea, or skewered on an Englishman’s blade. Featured image credit: Wikimedia 10The Pirate King 

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10 Amazing Female Pirates

Pirate Queen Teuta Of Illyria Few men had big enough balls to take on the might of Rome. It took a pirate queen such as Teuta of Illyria to take the Romans down a few notches. After the death of her husband, the King of Ardiaei,

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10 Unsolved Sea Mysteries

Murder At Sea Cell phones are lost every day, some by accident, some stolen. The majority of times, these incidents mean absolutely nothing other than that someone has to go and get a new phone. Other times, an innocent-looking cell phone might just harbor a terrible secret. This is exactly what happened when an abandoned cell phone was found in a taxi in Fiji in 2014. A video found on this phone landed on the Internet not long after and eventually attracted the attention of police.

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10 Bizarre Ways That Tiny Countries Make Money

Niue Hosted Phone Lines Niue is a tiny island in the Pacific with a declining population of around 1,190, down from over 5,000 during the 1960s. For many years, agriculture, fishing, and the occasional tourist were the mainstays of the Niue economy, but that all changed in the late 1980s, when the government signed a deal to allow premium-rate phone lines to be routed through the country’s area code. Banks of phone lines were installed, allowing calls to be switched through Niue to destinations around the world.

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10 Fascinating Facts About The Cows ... by May Ram

10 Fascinating Facts About The Cows Of The Sea KYLE ROBERTS DECEMBER 4, 2015 The sirenians are a group of mammals comprised of dugongs and manatees, including the extinct Steller’s sea cow. Generally, they are slow-moving, aquatic herbivores that don’t seem to do much besides eat. But that’s misleading. They are fascinating creatures that are severely endangered because of irresponsible human actions and need our protection. 10Their Name Comes From Mermaids

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10 Conspiracy Theories About The Ancient World

Caesarion Was Jesus Photo credit: Sdwelch1031 We have already discussed the theory that Jesus Christ was a corruption or work of propaganda based on the life and times of Julius Caesar. Some say it wasn’t Caesar who became Christ but rather his son Caesarion, borne by the Egyptian queen Cleopatra.

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10 Insane Nuclear Versions Of Normal Things

Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter Nuclear Space Probe The Galilean moons of Jupiter have a variety of fascinating features. Chief among these is the possibility of oceans in the moons, specifically on Europa and Ganymede. Where there is water, there is the chance for life, and NASA is fascinated with this possibility. To explore the moons, NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory have proposed and designed a variety of spacecraft to explore the moons. One of the most interesting was the nuclear-powered and futuristic-looking Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO).

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10 Fascinating And Forgotten Weapons From History

Key Guns The problem with keeping rowdy prisoners in check is that jailers often have to put themselves into potential danger to perform their duties. During the 17th century, some locksmiths had the ingenious idea of empowering jailers to help keep prisoners in check. Given that it was hard (if not impossible) for a jailer to hold a weapon and unlock a cell door at the same time, the solution was to make the key itself a weapon.

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10 Science Headlines That Defined 2015

World’s First Silicene Transistor Photo credit: Junki Sone et al. A few years ago, an allotrope of carbon called graphene was heralded as the “hot new thing” in nanotechnology. Formed on an atomic scale, it was 200 times stronger than steel, nearly invisible, and a great conductor of heat and electricity. In 2015, another product became the talk of the town—silicene.

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10 Incredible Stories From Before Written History

10 Incredible Stories From Before Written History ALEX HANTON DECEMBER 7, 2015 Prehistory, the time before written records emerged, ended at different times in different places, but it dwarfs written history everywhere. For a historian, that’s frustrating, since it means that most of the past is beyond typical research. However, prehistory doesn’t have to be an entirely closed book. Thanks to careful study and analysis, historians and archaeologists have retrieved some truly amazing stories previously lost to us in the modern world. 10The Last Stand Of The Pharaoh

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10 Fascinating Facts About The ‘Hunger Games’ Seri

Katniss Nearly Caused Worldwide Riots The Hunger Games: Mockingjay–Part 2 was released worldwide in November 2015. However, two countries notably delayed the release of the blockbuster movie: China and Thailand. Why did these countries do this?

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10 Amazing Construction Technologies That Could Ch

Diamond Nanothreads As far as we know, diamonds are the hardest minerals that occur naturally on Earth. In the right form, that strength makes diamonds an excellent building material.

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10 Strange And Mystical Cats People Believed In

Bakeneko Photo credit: Yosa Buson Bakeneko are supernatural cats from Japanese folklore. In the early years of its life, a bakeneko is no different from a typical house cat. But as it ages, it begins to develop supernatural powers. After a certain age, usually 12 or 13, a bakeneko begins to walk around on its hind legs like a human. It can also speak and understand human languages.

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10 Smart Ways Waste And Pollution Can Help The Wor

Beer Wastewater Beer is one of the most popular drinks in the world, with about 1.96 billion hectoliters brewed in 2014. That’s over 415 billion pints. In the brewing process, there is a lot of wastewater, which includes substances like wasted beer as well as spent barley and yeast. To take advantage of this water waste, Nutrinsic Corporation has developed a process that changes the condition of the water to nurture the growth of microorganisms that produce protein. Then the protein is harvested, concentrated, sterilized, and dried. The remaining product can be used as food for fishes and a by-product in other animal food. Also, the process makes the water clean, so it can be reused in the brewery.

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10 Natural Mysteries From Australia

Min Min Lights The Min Min lights have been called one of Australia’s biggest mysteries. The mischievous glowing orbs are said to tail travelers openly, and some bob after the frightened witnesses for long distances. Locals in Channel Country, Queensland, have known the Min Min lights for a long time: around six decades. One of the first sightings was a light that followed a stockman in 1918, soon after the local Min Min Hotel was lost to a fire. The mystery was named after the place.

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The 10 Best iPhone Photo Editing Apps (2014 Editio

The 10 Best iPhone Photo Editing Apps (2014 Edition) Posted by: Kate Wesson Editing your photos is a fun and important part of iPhone photography. But with thousands of iPhone photo editing apps available on the App Store, it can be difficult to know which ones to use. In this article you’re going to discover the 10 best photo editing apps that many iPhone photographers recommend to use. (Update: check out our latest 2015 edition of best photo editing apps). You don’t need to be an expert in lots of photo editing apps. I tend to use just two or three apps on a regular basis for image enhancement, and then a few others for specific tasks such as photo montages or removal of unwanted items. Some of the best apps are even free to download from the App Store! Any prices listed below are correct at the time of writing, but they can fluctuate so check at the time of downloading.

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10 Intriguing Mysteries Of The Arctic

Baffin Island Vikings Ever since the Viking settlement at L’Anse aux Meadows in Newfoundland was discovered in 1978, archaeologists have been scouring the east coast of North America for other evidence of Norse settlements. In 2012, a dig led by archeologist Patricia Sutherland north of the Arctic Circle on Canada’s Baffin Island discovered some intriguing whetstones, complete with grooves containing traces of a copper alloy (most likely bronze). Such materials were foreign to the Inuit, but were used by Viking smiths. Other evidence bolstered the idea that there was a Norse presence in the region. In 1999, two strands of cloth were discovered on Baffin Island. The strands differed from the animal sinew cords used by the Inuit, but were identical to yarn made by Norse women in Greenland in the 1400s. Other intriguing artifacts included wooden tally sticks for recording transactions, fragments of Old World rat pelts, and a whalebone shovel similar to those used in Greenland. Many researchers remain skeptical, but Sutherland believes that there was a significant Norse presence in the Canadian Arctic, trading with the locals for luxuries like walrus ivory and Arctic furs.

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10 Unexpected Ways The Sun Might Affect Human Life

The Sun And Arthritis Recently, a possible link has been demonstrated between solar storms and forms of arthritis, such as giant cell arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Although the reason for the link is unknown, further investigation may lead to preventative medicine or even a cure if the correlation is valid.

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10 Mysteries Of The Ancient World We’ve Just Aweso

The Downfall Of Cahokia Photo credit: Skubasteve834 About 1,000 years ago, Cahokia was North America’s greatest city, composed of 120 mounds spread out over 15 square kilometers (6 mi2) of the mighty Mississippi-adjacent floodplain. At one point, the city boasted a population of 20,000, larger than that of London and other prominent European centers. Some estimates place an even more impressive 40,000 inhabitants within its ancient city limits.

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The Downfall Of Cahokia

The Downfall Of Cahokia Photo credit: Skubasteve834 About 1,000 years ago, Cahokia was North America’s greatest city, composed of 120 mounds spread out over 15 square kilometers (6 mi2) of the mighty Mississippi-adjacent floodplain. At one point, the city boasted a population of 20,000, larger than that of London and other prominent European centers. Some estimates place an even more impressive 40,000 inhabitants within its ancient city limits.

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Top 10 Unknowable Things

Graham’s Number It has been said that the problem with people’s perception of the universe is that our brains are only used to dealing with small numbers, short distances and brief periods of time. Graham’s number is big enough to make most people’s brains start to steam; it’s really big; to put it into context, let’s look at some, so-called, big numbers:

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The Most Beautiful Christmas Trees

Dazzling Photos Reveal Japan’s Greenest Illuminated Christmas Ever   Even though most Japanese are Shintoists and Buddhists, they really know how to put on a show for Christmas. All around the country whimsical decorations boasting the latest technologies and millions of LED lights twinkle in the eye of locals and tourists ready for some serious light-gazing. Click through our gallery for amazing images of some of Japan's best illuminated spots.

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10 More Things We Can’t Comprehend

Feeling Blue What does ‘blue’ look like? If the above question sounds nonsensical, it is because it is one which defies any kind of meaningful answer. In physics, color is defined based on the wavelengths of light reflected off an object, but this explanation fails to describe the subjective sensation of sight.

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Top 10 Mysteries of Outer Space by May Ram

Are there Other Universes? This is one of the more controversial arguments out there. The theory is that there are an infinite number of universes, each which is governed by its own set of laws and physics. Many scientists dismiss this argument as nothing more than speculation, as there is no evidence or mathematical law that allows for the existence of other universes. However, believers in this theory have argued that there are none that disprove it either. This is one mystery which can only be solved if we were able to travel there, however, with the expansion of the universe, it is unlikely humanity will ever find the answer.

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Top 10 Mass Extinctions

The Lau Event Following the Ordovician extinction, the Silurian period began. Life recovered from the last mass extinction and this period was marked by the development of true sharks and bony fish, most of which appeared perfectly modern.

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10 Alternatives To The Conventional Big Bang Theor

Eternal Inflation Most modern models of the early universe posit a short period of exponential growth (known as inflation) caused by vacuum energy, in which neighboring particles rapidly found themselves separated by vast regions of space. After this inflation, the vacuum energy decayed into a hot plasma soup that eventually formed atoms, molecules, and so on.

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10 Cool Magazines From The Past You’ll Want To Get

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10 Strange Theoretical Subatomic Particles

Bateman Particle Photo credit: NASA, ESA, M.J. Jee, and H. Ford Proposed by a team led by James Bateman, this unnamed particle is another candidate for a superlight dark matter particle. Bateman’s particle is much heavier than the axion but still only a fraction of the mass of an electron. Like other dark matter candidates, the new particle would be completely invisible because it would not interact with light. However, it would interact with normal matter, explaining some of the anomalies around dark matter.

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10 Bizarre Attempts At Vertical Takeoff And Landin

The XFV-1 Salmon Photo via Wikimedia The other side of the coin in Project Hummingbird was the XFV-1, Lockheed’s attempt at a VTOL aircraft. Instead of using cruciform wings, the XFV-1 used an X-tail to support itself on the ground.

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10 Weird Facts About The Incredible Velvet Worm

Misplaced Reproductive Organs Photo credit: Martin Smith Velvet worm reproduction is as bizarre and unsettling as the way that this animal finds food. Yet the worst of the bodily damage sustained during reproduction is inflicted by a certain type of female velvet worm after interaction with a selected male.

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10 ‘What-If’ Scenarios About Our Solar System

Earth Reverses Spin The most obvious effect of the Earth’s spin being reversed would be the Sun rising in the west and setting in the east, but this would be quite the challenge. According to Penn State astrophysicist Kevin Luhman, “The Earth spins the way it does because it was basically born that way. [ . . . ] When the sun was a newborn baby star, it had a whole bunch of gas and dust circling around it in a big disc-like structure.” The only planet which spins in the opposite direction is Venus, probably due to a collision billions of years ago. Repeating that process on Earth would likely remove any observers to the long-term effects.

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10 Terrifying Ways To be Trapped In Your Own Body

ALS   One of the most feared and gruesome of all progressive illnesses is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, after the famous baseball player who died of the condition. ALS causes irreversible loss of control of the body over the course of months or years. The degeneration is due to the death of motor neurons, the cells that signal movement to muscles.

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10 Weird Trains That Now Belong To The History Boo

Bennie Railplane The Bennie Railplane was invented by George Bennie in 1930. To replace coal-powered steam engines, the train ran on special tracks that Bennie planned to build above regular railroad tracks. The train looked similar to more modern cable cars except for its two propellers that were powered by an engine. Wheels on top of the train allowed it to move along its overhead tracks.

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Top 10 Animal Bites that will Completely Destroy Y

Tiger 1050 psi The biggest species of the cat family, the tiger is a solitary hunter. They can reach 3.3 meters and weigh up to 300lbs.

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10 Cutest Baby Animals In The World

4. Turtles/Hatchlings Turtles/Hatchlings-magazine.fourseasons.com The smaller they are, the cuter they look.

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10 Fascinating Discoveries From Meteorite Impact C

The Ancient Asteroid Photo credit: Jacques Descloitres When a meteorite hits the Earth, the force of the impact usually vaporizes it. Only bits and pieces are left. So the fossilized meteorite that was unearthed in the Morokweng crater of South Africa was a bit of a surprise. The meteorite fragment was about 25 centimeters (10 in) in diameter and was found 750 meters (2,500 ft) below the surface of the Earth. Although it’s not the largest meteorite to hit our planet, it is the largest piece of a meteorite that’s been found as of late 2015.

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10 Awesome Feats Of Wartime Engineering

Defenses Of Washington At the outbreak of the Civil War, Washington, DC, was virtually exposed to any determined Confederate attack to capture the capital. Only a lone fort 19 kilometers (12 mi) to the south stood in the way of the White House lawn becoming a Confederate encampment. The fort in question had no effective armament and was commanded by a drunken ordnance sergeant. With enemy territory just across the Potomac River, the Union was obligated to tie down an army, that might otherwise be used in other operations, to defend the city. The Union government needed to act fast to remedy the situation.

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10 Bacterial Candidates For Bioweaponry

Clostridium Botulinum Botulism is caused by Clostridium botulinum, a common soil bacterium that, like Bacillus anthracis, can produce dormant spores. It is a paralytic disease caused by a neurotoxin produced by the bacterium. The toxin is very potent and can cause a mortality rate of up to 50%, although the casualties have dropped significantly in recent years.

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10 Awesome And Wacky Space Technologies Of The Fut

Solar Probe Plus Like Earth, the Sun is fairly windy with its own gusts and gales. But while an earthly breeze might mess up your hair, a solar zephyr will turn you into a charred tumor. Although this energetic phenomenon remains mysterious, NASA’s Solar Probe Plus should answer many long-held questions in 2018 by zipping closer to the Sun than any previous craft has.

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10 Real-Life Costs Of Action Movies

Spectre 2015 At some point in your life, you’ve probably thought about how great it would be to be a spy like James Bond. He has cool clothes, awesome gadgets, and slick cars. Tech Insider decided to take a look at how much it would cost to be James Bond in Spectre, and let’s just say if you’re a taxpayer in the UK, you better hope that there really isn’t a spy in MI6 like Bond.

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10 Historical Firearms With Wildly Unusual Charact

10 Historical Firearms With Wildly Unusual Characteristics ELIZABETH S. ANDERSON DECEMBER 29, 2015 Thousands of firearms have been invented since the discovery of gunpowder. Yet only a few have been widely adopted. Most have become forgotten firearms, some with wildly unusual characteristics. 10Punt Gun

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10 Simple And Enduring Mysteries Of Our World

Which Country Is Happiest In the aftermath of the 2008 financial crash, many began to look for better methods of measuring a country’s well-being than GDP. Enter the National Happiness Index, which has been brought in by governments everywhere from Thailand to the UK. In theory, it’s a great idea; human life is about far more than just contributing to the economy. In practice, however, the measurements are often wildly contradictory.

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10 Intriguing Backstories Behind Common Symbols

  Mathematical Signs The symbols for addition and subtraction first emerged in the 15th century. The “+” sign seems to have been one of many ways that the Latin word et, meaning “and,” was abbreviated. The ancient Greeks had used the letter “psi” for addition (or sometimes simply juxtaposition), while the Hindus used the word yu, and the ancient Egyptians used a pair of legs walking forward to denote addition or walking away to denote subtraction.

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10 People Who Survived Being Buried Alive

The Man From Ferraz De Vasconcelos A woman living in the Sao Paulo suburb of Ferraz de Vasconcelos got quite a shock in 2013. She was visiting her family tomb when she witnessed a truly disturbing sight. Near the tomb, she could see a man trying to escape from his grave. He’d already freed his hands and head on his own, and now he was attempting to pull the rest of his body out of the ground.

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The Most Expensive Dogs in the World by May Ram

The Most Expensive Dogs in the World #10 Saluki Photo: www.vetstreet.com The Saluki is also known as the Slougui.

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Habits Of Highly Successful Women

2. Focus Source: www.feminiya.com

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10 Amazing Galactic Oddities

EGS8p7 Shouldn’t Be Visible Photo credit: NASA At over 13.2 billion years old, galaxy EGS8p7 is so ancient that we shouldn’t be able to see it. During the post–big bang hangover, the universe was a hot jumble of protons and electrons. As it cooled, the particles combined into neutral hydrogen.

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10 Important Things You Won’t Believe We Managed T

The Last Two Decades Of Scientific Data Science survives on raw data. Without good data to back them up, our conclusions are essentially worthless. Yet scientists are surprisingly bad at holding on to that data. According to a 2013 study published in Current Biology, the vast majority of raw data from experiments over the last two decades is now completely inaccessible. The team looked at 516 papers published between 1991 and 2011. To their grim surprise, they found that the amount of data missing or destroyed from the most recent papers was 23 percent. When the team checked the oldest papers, they found that 90 percent of the raw data was gone forever.

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10 Things You Didn’t Know Babies Could Do

Judging Character The ability to judge how likely someone is to help you comes built in as an evolutionary trait. It’s a social skill that’s essential to operating in a society as well as to survival. This was especially true during the hunter-gatherer times, when knowing if someone was likely to kill you and steal your belongings was pretty helpful.

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10 Biggest Medical Breakthroughs Of 2015

  Cancer Drug Might Help Parkinson’s Sufferers Tasigna (aka nilotinib) is an FDA-approved drug that is regularly used to treat people with leukemia. However, a new trial conducted at the Georgetown University Medical Center suggests that Tasigna could be extremely potent in managing the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease by improving cognition, motor skills, and nonmotor functions.

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10 Surprising Near-Death Experiences That May Chan

Islamic Experiences Photo credit: Ulysses Quinttus Islam teaches that after the death of the physical body, there is a kind of “soul sleep” known as Barzakh that will persist until the resurrection and judgment. What exactly happens in Barzakh is unknown because the scriptures say that the dead cannot know or perceive the events of the living world and the living cannot know the status of the dead. Yet, many Muslims believe that certain people are given hints of their eventual fate during Barzakh, a preview of eternal damnation or bliss.

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10 Perplexing Mysteries That May Have Finally Been

Shark Navigation The ocean is a vast and empty place, yet sharks are able to navigate the oceans with incredible accuracy. For example, great white sharks frequently swim between Hawaii and California, while salmon sharks swim from Alaska to the subtropical Pacific. It’s a phenomenon that has baffled scientists for years. Hypotheses about how sharks manage to do this range from odor cues to the Earth’s electromagnetic fields, but until recently, nobody’s ever conclusively proven one theory over any of the others.

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10 Utterly Vicious Creepy Crawlies

Mantidflies Are The Scourge Of Spiders Mantidflies are a unique species of jerk. They’re not as brutally over-the-top as bone-house wasps, but they more than make up for it through sneakiness and cunning. As adults, they resemble praying mantids (hence the name) and prey on smaller insects. But as larvae, they only have a few stubby legs to move around on. It’s not much to hunt with, but it’s all they need. That’s because mantidfly larvae are parasites. After they hatch on a leaf or branch, they’ll sit there until a spider wanders by. With a well-timed leap, they’ll hitch a ride on the spider and ride it back to the spider’s nest to wait for it to have sex. But although they might suck a little spider blood to tide them over until the big score, mantidflies don’t really want the spider—they want its eggs.

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10 Spectacular Geologic Formations And Events Of A

The Western Great Lakes During the peak of the most recent ice age, known as the Last Glacial Maximum, the western United States boasted its own set of great lakes, as voluminous as the current Great Lakes. Stanford researchers have finally sussed out that their mammoth size was due to lower evaporation rates.

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10 Creepy Valentine’s Day Mysteries That Are Still

10 Creepy Valentine’s Day Mysteries That Are Still Unsolved or many people, February 14 is a joyous date on which to celebrate the romantic union with your significant other. However, this does not mean that dark, mysterious, and tragic things do not happen on St. Valentine’s Day. In fact, one of the most infamous murders of all time even bears its name. In 1929, a group of Chicago mobsters believed to be working for Al Capone gunned down seven rival gang members in cold blood, and the incident forever became known as the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre. Here are 10 more stories of unsolved mysteries that just happened to take place on Valentine’s Day. Appropriately, it’s likely that some of these cases are the result of love gone bad. 10The Murder Of Jodine Serrin

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empowr by May Ram

How to Cash Out your MCO   Matured Cash Out On June 30 th, 2016   Good morning all.   It has been a while that I post something about empowr. My apology for my absence. Here is a quick explanation on how to cash out your Matured Cash Out (MCO). How it works: It’s actually very simple -   Click here==> Balance page And scroll down a bit, click on " Cash Out" and you will find your matured Cash Out as follows. To complete the MCO, simply click the cash out button:  This is how you see on your Desktop version. This is how you see on your empowr app:   By doing so, you will prompt the system to send a unique cash out key to your mobile device: Make sure that empowr app notification on your phone is" on" Check on your phone and Click on "OK"   Enter the amount of your MCO. Choose the cash out method ==> PayPal or Bank Check. If your account is already validated with PayPal, you just click on PayPal and immediately click on submit, and it is done. If your account is not validated with PayPal, and you choose PayPal, then you will be asked to validate first then cash out.   If you choose a Check by choosing " Don't have PayPal or Credit Card", you will be asked to enter your information such as name and address where you want the check to send to. And click on "submit". Please note that Credit Card option is currently not applicable.           Then you got congratulation note.     You will see it pending in your balance.           Click here ==> Official post by our first president I hope this help. If you have questions, concerns, please contact your free Success Coach. How to turn on empowr app notification on your iPhone? Click here==> empowrapp app on Here is How to cash out your ECO. Have an amazing day, to all. Kisses.

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10 Recent Findings From The Fascinating World Of A

Taking On The Pesticide Market The goal of meeting future global food demand in a more sustainable way has found an unlikely ally. According to a review published in the Journal of Applied Ecology, ants can be more effective than pesticides as well as safer and cheaper.

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10 Mystical Tales Of Ordinary Foodstuffs

Tuna While cans of tuna fish are considered humble or even uninspiring fare in the industrialized West, for the traditionally seafaring cultures of the Maldives, the tuna is a fish with lofty origins. Maldivian folklore speaks of a legendary navigator named Bodu Niyami Takurufanu who first introduced the favored skipjack tuna to the islands. While on a trading voyage, Bodu Niyami’s crew caught a large, fat fiyala fish. Busy making astronomical calculations on the mast, Bodu Niyami ordered them to save him the head of the fish, but when he descended in hunger, he discovered one of his crew had picked it clean and thrown it into the sea to hide the evidence. Enraged, he ordered the helmsman to sail in the direction the fish head had been thrown.

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10 Things School Didn’t Tell You About Amelia Earh

10 Things School Didn’t Tell You About Amelia Earhart’s Disappearance ZOE PERZO MARCH 17, 2016 Amelia Earhart’s disappearance has always been presented as an unfathomable mystery, especially to schoolchildren. We were told about this celebrated woman who disappeared “somewhere” in the Pacific. We don’t know what happened to her, and we probably never will. But what of the evidence we already have?   We Know Where She Disappeared 

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10 Artifacts Discovered From The Depths Of The Sea

Egyptian Artifacts Of Thonis-Heracleion And Canopus In 2000, Franck Goddio, founder of the European Institute for Underwater Archaeology, made a groundbreaking discovery while searching for sunken sites in the western part of the Nile Delta. In the Mediterranean Sea, Goddio and his team found nearly 250 Egyptian artifacts that were linked to the submerged cities of Canopus and Thonis (aka Heracleion).

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10 Amazing Animals That Clone Themselves

Marmorkrebs A recent marvel, the marmorkreb (German for “marbled crayfish”) astounded scientists after it was discovered that the sea creature reproduced without mating. Making history, the marbled crayfish is the first crustacean of its kind to clone itself by reproducing asexually. Through a process called parthenogenesis, the marmorkreb produces an egg that develops without fertilization.

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10 Bizarre Funeral Customs From Around The World

10 Bizarre Funeral Customs From Around The World SIMON GRIFFIN MARCH 20, 2016 Death can be a very personal and upsetting thing, but it can also be a very spiritual and communal occasion. It’s something that has affected us since before we were even human, and it makes up 50 percent of life’s certainties (for the time being, anyway). How societies treat their dead is one of the most insightful ways to learn about their customs, religion, social life, hierarchies, art, technology, and pretty much everything else you can think of. But there are a lot of people in the world, and we’ve been around for a long time, so it was inevitable that we’d come up with a few strange reactions to death. 10Ifugao Funerals

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10 Amazing Astronomical Relics

Buena Vista Buena Vista, the western hemisphere’s oldest observatory, is tucked away in the Peruvian Andes several miles from Lima. At 4,200 years old, it predates the Incan civilization by a whopping 3,000 years. It also predates fire-hardened pottery. It’s so aged that archaeologists can’t even identify itsAndean creators—only that they were 800 years ahead of the curve.

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Enriching Mathematics

Enriching Mathematics Dramatic Mathematics Stage: 1 and 2 Article by Jenni Back and Trisha Lee Published October 2005,September 2004,February 2011. Children are born with an ability to make sense of the world through play and storytelling. By creating narratives, they act out concepts and ideas that confuse them or that they find fascinating. Examining the world in this way they are able to explore and relate to the variety of topics and subjects that the world throws at them.

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10 Crazy Conspiracy Theories About Extraterrestria

The Giant People Who Live Under The Earth’s Crust Most people look to space in the hopes of finding alien life; others search among us for those who may be “hybrids.” Yet there are also those who are convinced that much of the world above us is a sham and that the true secrets are beneath our feet—beneath the Earth. With the advent of social media, conspiracies that suggest that the Earth is nothing like people think are becoming more popular. While many theorists like to claim that the Earth is flat, others say that it is hollow and that there is a completely separate world inside of it, which somehow has its own, functioning Sun despite being inside our Earth. According to these conspiracy claims, Admiral Byrd did not actually fly over the North Pole in the 1940s—he flew inside it. He discovered another world inside the Earth’s crust, and the government has been doing its best to cover up the story ever since.

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11 Brain-Twisting Paradoxes

The arrow paradox In the arrow paradox, Zeno states that for motion to be occurring, an object must change the position which it occupies. He gives an example of an arrow in flight. He states that in any one instant of time, for the arrow to be moving it must either move to where it is, or it must move to where it is not. It cannot move to where it is not, because this is a single instant, and it cannot move to where it is because it is already there. In other words, in

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10 Strange Robots That Could Potentially Save Live

HRP-2 Kai And Jaxon Anime is probably one of Japan’s greatest contributions to modern pop culture. It’s everywhere—in songs, movies, food, hairstyles, toys, and more. So it’s no surprise that a team of Japanese robotic engineers created anime-inspired robots.

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10 Cats That Became World-Famous

Orangey Probably everyone knows Orangey, an orange tabby from the classic film Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Apart from this timeless movie with the charming Audrey Hepburn, this feline participated in other Hollywood films and won two Patsy Awards, which meant the ultimate recognition of his genius gift to acting. Despite his charming play on screen, Orangey had a completely opposite character in real life. He often hid in the studio, where no one could find him, or clawed actors he did not like.

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10 Facts About The Most Interesting Reptile In The

Breeding Problems Like pandas, tuataras are not too keen on reproduction. For an animal this small, the tuatara can live for quite a long time. Its estimated life span is well over 100 years. However, they reach sexual maturity between 10 and 20 years, and females can only breed once every two to five years. This agonizingly slow rate of reproduction is one reason why they’re so rare. Furthermore, since tuataras live only on a few islands around New Zealand, this means their extremely small populations are vulnerable to inbreeding. This further lowers the resilience of the population. On the flip side, they can also breed at some pretty extreme ages. A male tuatara held at the Southland Museum and Art Gallery in New Zealand became a father at 111 years old. That’s the same age of Bilbo Baggins when his party takes place in The Fellowship of the Ring.

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10 Bizarre Traditions Of Love That Are Lost In His

Wearing Your Heart On Your Sleeve Have you ever wondered where the rather strange expression, “wearing your heart on your sleeve,” came from? There are actually three possible explanations for its origin. The first theory suggests that it originated in the Middle Ages when, during a Roman festival, men drew names to determine the identity of their lady friend for the coming year. Once the name of the lady was known, it was worn on the man’s sleeve for the remainder of the festival. This rather strange tradition began after Emperor Claudius II forbade marriage due to his firm belief that unmarried men made better soldiers. As an alternative to marriage, he suggested this strange “temporary coupling.”

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10 Killer Mammals That Commit Infanticide

Meerkats If there is one animal that knows that there is power in numbers, it is the meerkat. Native to the southern plains of Africa, the very sociable and organized meerkats (also called suricates) form communities that work together in all aspects to survive. While the group goes about its day-to-day business, there are usually lookouts that signal to the rest of the community when trouble is afoot. What may come as a shock, however, is that despite an immense sense of community, the meerkat females are actually tyrants.

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The 30 Most Amazing Higher Ed Natural History Muse

29. The College of Idaho – Orma J. Smith Museum of Natural History The Orma J. Smith Museum of Natural History is the only natural history museum in the region

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10 by May Ram

2. Kidney Stones Source   A kidney stone is an extremely painful medical condition. Bitter melon can be helpful in ridding the body of kidney stones through naturally breaking them down. Bitter melon reduces high acid that help produce painful kidney stones. Infuse bitter melon powder with water to create a healthful tea. This tea has a nutty flavor and, surprisingly, does not require sweetening.

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10 Intriguing Strategies In The War Between Plants

An Unlikely Ally In 2015, researchers from Florida State University published a multi-year study regarding the impact of ants and treehoppers on a type of plant called rabbitbrush. The study revealed a surprising web of interspecies alliances in the meadows of Colorado. It’s a fight for food and survival, with a lot of twists and turns.

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10 Fascinating New Species We’ve Just Discovered

A Slithering Snakehead Fish Photo credit: WWF But not all of the new Eastern Himalayan species are as adorable as the sneezing monkey. Channa andrao is a species of snakehead fish boasting sharp teeth, a taste for blood, and the ability to slither on land for almost 500 meters (1,600 ft). Dubbed “Fishzilla” by National Geographic, the vibrant blue nightmare was found lurking in the Lefraguri swamp of West Bengal’s Himalaya region in 2013. Although related to other snakehead fish, it was easily identified as a distinct species thanks to its unique color pattern and lack of pelvic fins. It is believed to be an aggressive ambush predator, skulking at the bottom of the swamp before lunging upward to snatch passing prey.

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10 Recently Discovered Animals With Amazing Featur

10 Recently Discovered Animals With Amazing Features AOXUE W. FEBRUARY 12, 2016 Nearly 200 species of plants and animals become extinct on an average day. At the same time, thousands of new species turn up every year, each with seemingly more spectacular features than the last. Featured image credit: Christian Lukhaup 10Psychedelic Sea Slug

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10 Scientifically ‘Elemental’ Murders

10 Scientifically ‘Elemental’ Murders SARAH JENNINGS MARCH 31, 2016 Since Dmitri Mendeleev created his periodic table of elements in 1869, scientists have worked to identify the materials that make up the world around us. While many discoveries were made through fairly benign methods, there have been some horrifying deaths along the way. Marie and Pierre Curie’s work with radioactive material killed the married couple. In fact, their notebooks are still so highly contaminated that researchers have chosen to lock them away. There has always been a bit of excitement when a “new” element is discovered. In some cases, merchants and advertisers have unknowingly exposed thousands of people to dangerous chemicals, such as selling waterlaced with radium as a cure for ailments of the endocrine system. Then there are those who took a different approach to testing and profiting from the elements. 10Polonium

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10 Remarkable But Scary Developments In Artificial

They’re Starting To Take Over Our Jobs Many of us are afraid of AIs and robots killing us, but scientists say we should be more worried about something less horrifying—machines eliminating our jobs. Several experts are concerned that advances in artificial intelligence and automation could result in many people losing their jobs to machines. In the United States alone, there are 250,000 robots performing work that humans used to do. What’s more alarming is that this number is increasing by double digits every year.

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10 Musicians Who Mastered Bizarre Instruments

10 Musicians Who Mastered Bizarre Instruments BRYCE RILEY APRIL 2, 2016 Mastering any type of instrument is no small feat. But some people seek greater challenges than those offered by modern music. After the following musicians got bored with conventional instruments, they dug up old ones from ancient history or created their own from scratch. Featured image credit: FiguresDotCom via YouTube 10Novmichi Tosa Otamatone

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10 Influential Women Executed During The Reign Of

10 Influential Women Executed During The Reign Of TheTudors NICOLLETTE B APRIL 4, 2016 The Tudor dynasty, which reigned for nearly 120 exciting years, gave rise to five monarchs who are among the most infamous and provocative sovereigns in history. The Tudors’ century of prosperity, hardships, intrigue, and war was unavoidably riddled with death—most notably at the hands of the ruthless King Henry VIII. According to historians, Henry VIII allegedly executed between 57,000 and 72,000 people. Although these numbers may be an exaggeration, his three children—Edward VI, Mary I, and Elizabeth I—also had the blood of many victims on their hands. Some notable women lost their lives due to their politics, their beliefs, and their hearts. 10Margaret Ward

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10 Mesmerizing Facts About Hypnosis

Hypnotic Induction Source Hypnotic Induction is essentially the method used to hypnotize the subject. If you are performing auto suggestion then this might involve a recording, but essentially this refers to whatever methods are used to bring about the hypnotic trance state required for heightened suggestibility.

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10 Fascinating Historical Origins Of Everyday Idio

Give The Cold Shoulder Today’s meaning: To disregard someone Although its true origins are unclear, the earliest written evidence of this phrase comes from the writings of Walter Scott, a Scottish poet and novelist who lived in the 18th and 19th centuries. Though his work never mentions food or gives any indication as to its origin, it is believed that it derives from an earlier phrase “to give the cold shoulder of mutton.”

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10 Creepy Tales About Well-Known Mountains

Headless Annie A horrific tale from Kentucky has it that a miner in the 1930s was leading a unionization effort near Black Mountain.

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10 Amazing Facts About The Immortal Cells Of Henri

Some Scientists Suggest That HeLa Cells May Be A New Species Photo credit: National Institutes of Health According to evolutionary biologist Leigh Van Valen of the University of Chicago, HeLa cells have no connection to people. Van Valen and other scientists claim that the cells are microbial in nature, bear no resemblance to human cells, and should be considered as an entirely new species. It is believed that HeLa cells have genetically evolved over time to adapt to their environment—the petri dish—as a result of natural selection. Reportedly, there are now new strains of HeLa cells that have arisen in recent years.

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Top 10 Obsolete Weapons That Were Shockingly Deadl

Vickers Machine Gun Photo credit: Halibutt Another outdated British weapon from World War II was the Vickers machine gun. When the war started, the Germans used the excellent MG 34 and MG 42 machine guns. These weapons came into service right before the war or during it. On the other hand, the British entered the war with the Vickers, an archaic machine gun designed in the early 20th century with late 19th-century technology.

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10 Forgotten Sects Of Major Religions

Millerites Photo via Wikipedia Common in Christianity is the idea that Jesus Christ will return to the world again and usher in a period of peace and prosperity. For centuries, Christian leaders have prophesied about the Second Coming, with claims reaching their fever pitch in the US in the 19th century during a period of religious intensity. One of the most prominent teachers on the subject of the End Times was William Miller, who created his own Christian sect known as the Millerites.

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Top 10 Bizarre Ancient Roman Medical Treatments

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Top 10 Bizarre Ancient Roman Medical... by May Ram

Warts Warts had a wide range of cures. Often, Romans would burn cow dung, mouse dung, or the fat of a swan to rid themselves of warts. Pliny suggested taking a freshly podded pea and touching it to each nodule. Then he instructed his readers to wrap the peas securely in a cloth and throw them backward.

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10 Places Between This World And The Next

Hamestagan A Zoroastrian concept, Hamestagan is where the souls of those whose good and bad deeds were found to be equal await resurrection. Souls are weighed on the scales of the god Rasnu, and it is believed that the concept of Hamestagan appeared as an answer to the question of what happens to souls whose good and bad deeds weighed the same.

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10 Carnivorous Mushrooms And Plants You Didn’t Kno

10 Carnivorous Mushrooms And Plants You Didn’t Know About WILLIAM LIGHT APRIL 14, 2016 About 200 species of fungi are known to attack, kill, and digest tiny animals, including protozoans, rotifers, small arthropods like tardigrades (“water bears”), copepods and other crustaceans, and nematodes (worms). Over 600 species of plants also kill animal prey, primarily insects, spiders, other arthropods, and even small vertebrates, including occasional frogs, lizards, rats, and birds. Why do they do this? These fungi and plants grow in habitats that offer little of the nutrients they need, especially nitrogen, a necessary element for making proteins. The fungi tend to parasitize or decompose the woody trunks of trees, which are very limited in nitrogen. The plants are usually found in acidic bogs, sphagnum moss, or other nitrogen-poor environments. Most plants take up nitrogen through their roots, often with the help of nitrogen-fixing bacteria, and most fungi absorb nutrients from the soil. But in their nutrient-poor habitats, these meat-eating fungi and plants have evolved various forms of lures and weapons, some of them rivaling the most vicious and brutal devices seen in any medieval torture chamber, to attract and kill their hapless victims. 10Toilet Bowl Pitcher Plants

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10 Cursed Souls Who Made Deals With The Devil

Paulo Gil Source The Devil was alive and well in colonial-era Brazil, and the journals of a freedman named Joao Batista tell the story of a local sorcerer called Paulo Gil.

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10 Amazing People Who Did Crazy Things For Science

Jose  Delgado What would you do if a raging bull was charging toward you? Unless you’re a trained torero or matador, you would most likely run like you’ve never run before. But Jose Delgado was different. He had never been in a bullfight until he bravely faced an angry bull running toward him at full speed. Luckily, he survived. But why would he do such a thing? Well, for science. Jose Delgado was a brilliant neurophysiologist who worked at Yale University from 1946 to 1974 and was the first to experiment on animal brain implants.

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10 Mysteries Of Nature That Are Finally Solved

Where Earth’s Water Came From Water is the key to life on Earth, but its origin on our planet had been a mystery. Until recently, we had no idea whether water came here on a meteorite or whether it developed independently on Earth. Finally, some newer studies have settled the debate. Water was here all along and facilitated the birth of the first organisms.

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10 Fascinating Origins Of Everyday Numerical Codes

999 999 is the British equivalent of 911. It was introduced on June 30, 1937, two years after five women died in a house fire. Before its introduction, people had to send telegrams to the police or go to the police station to report emergencies. Alternatively, they could press “0” to dial their phone exchange and ask the operator to connect them to the police, ambulance, or fire department, as applicable.

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Top 10 Bizarre Insect Predators

Ant-Eating Slug Maggots Photo credit: PaulT The larvae of Microdon mutabilis fly (adult pictured above) are so unusual-looking that they were once mistaken for a species of slug. They’re shaped like a smooth, flattened dome with a thick, rubbery surface.

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10 Mysterious Cats Of Great Britain

10 Mysterious Cats Of Great Britain BENJAMIN WELTON APRIL 22, 2016 Big cats, such as lions, tigers, and leopards, are not native to the British Isles. The most fearsome feline known to the British are the wildcats (Felis silvestris silvestris) that have made a cozy home in the Highlands of Scotland. Despite this fact, Great Britain is a treasure trove of big cat sightings. England is particularly active, with rural felines populating areas like Dartmoor and West Sussex. Most of these reported sightings fall into the “mystery cat” category, which is usually an area occupied by folklorists and cryptozoologists.

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10 Dark Ancient Origins Of Everyday Phrases

Blue Blood’ To be a “blue blood” is to be of noble birth. The phrase is also used to describe anyone born into a wealthy or influential family. “Blue blood,” which is the literal translation of the Spanish phrase sangre azul, has its dark origin in medieval Spain. During the rule of Ferdinand of Aragon and Isabella of Castile, the Moorish and Jewish people in Spain were given an ultimatum to convert to Christianity or leave. All who stayed had to convert to Christianity to be accepted as citizens of the country.

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Top 10 Magical Societies

Top 10 Magical Societies JAMES NICKERSON APRIL 27, 2016 Who wouldn’t like to be a magician, able to sling spells of power? People are obsessed with magical power and societies due their prominence in popular culture, but very few know about the real magicians and magical societies that populate our world today. These magical orders are quite real, and here are 10 societies that can help to start your magical training! 10Builders Of The Adytum Photo credit: Builders of Sthe Adytum The Builders of the Adytum, commonly referred to as BOTA, is a magical organization based out California and has growing branches throughout the world.

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Top 10 Brainwashing Techniques

Top 10 Brainwashing Techniques GEORGE EDWARDS APRIL 29, 2016 The term “brainwashing” was invented by reporter Edward Hunter during the Korean War to describe the “re-education” techniques that the Chinese used on captured American soldiers. The term has since become associated with cults, which often use a combination of psychological methods to render their members compliant. The psychologist Margaret Singer argued that at any given time around 2.5 million people in the US alone are members of cults known to use brainwashing techniques. However, the idea of brainwashing has always been controversial. Hunter was associated with the intelligence community and it has been suggested that the CIA promoted the term as an easy way to explain away the rapid growth of Communism at the time. The psychologists Robert Lifton and Edgar Schein concluded that American POWs who made anti-American statements mostly did so to avoid physical punishment, and that brainwashing of POWs was not particularly successful. It is thus important to be aware that there is some debate as to what exactly constitutes brainwashing and how effective it can be. 10Chanting And Singing The act of chanting mantras is an important feature of many religions,

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10 Animals With A Serious Flair For Design

The Society Where Style Is All About Power     Source In the human world, style is thought to be personal. There’s no real right or wrong. However, for one species of bird, there is only one “in” look—and not everyone gets to rock it.

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10 Crazy Features Of Old Cars

Automatic Seatbelts Seatbelts weren’t always commonplace in cars. Early on, many manufacturers offered them as a choice or luxury, and many people that had them didn’t pay much attention to wearing them. During the late ’70s, as the government became more conscious of safety, automatic seatbelts were born.

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10 Types Of Alien Weather That Put Earth To Shame

10 Types Of Alien Weather That Put Earth To Shame ALAN BOYLE The weather on Earth can be pretty destructive, but aside from the occasional fire tornado, it’s mostly just water falling out of the sky. If you want really crazy weather, you need to get off this planet. The stuff going on around other planets and stars makes hurricanes seem like a soft summer breeze. 10Storms Made Of Glass Located 63 light years from Earth, the planet HD 189733b is a “hot Jupiter.” It’s actually 13 percent more massive than Jupiter but 30 times closer to its star than Earth is to the Sun. It’s the closest planet of its type to our solar system, and that means scientists have been able to figure out a fair amount about it.

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10 Sacrificial Rituals Practiced By Ancient Farmer

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10 Bizarre Ways Scientists Believe Aliens Will Con

Destruction Of An Alien Planet One of the ways we may be able to spot alien civilizations is through the destruction of their own planet, says Dr. Nathalie Cabrol, who is leading the hunt for alien life at the SETI Institute in California. “There is a window in time when you can expect a civilization to get to this disequilibrium as we are in now. During this time, you will find signatures in the atmosphere of a planet that shouldn’t be there.”

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10 Shocking Reasons For Product Recalls

Arm-Wrestling Arcade Game Breaks People’s Arms       source In 2007, the arm-wrestling video game Arm Spirit was introduced in Japanese arcades. The game itself had a fairly unique premise: players sat down and literally arm-wrestled a robotic arm.

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10 Ridiculous But Surprisingly Fascinating Scienti

Dogs Defecate In A North-South Stance Several studies suggest that certain animal species—such as birds, foxes, and deer—possess magnetic sensitivity. Inspired by this research, a team of scientists from the Czech Republic decided to find out if dogs possess this amazing ability, too.

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Top 10 Fascinating Facts About Neanderthals

They’ll Soon Return Neanderthals have been extinct for thousands of years now, but in the near future, there is a big possibility that they might return and coexist with us. This radical idea, as crazy as it might sound, is possible thanks to cloning. Scientists have already been successful in cloning certain animal species such as cows, pigs, rats, dogs, and cats. In 2003, they achieved a monumental biological feat when they cloned the Pyrenean ibex, an extinct species of wild mountain goat. Unfortunately, the clone died after several minutes.

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10 Ignored Warnings That Were Tragically Deadly

The Bombing Of Pearl Harbor Photo credit: National Archives The Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor drove the United States into a certain fracas called World War II. Before the attack, Japan was known to be gathering intelligence on the US military and carrying out reconnaissance operations along the US coast. Three days before the attack, President Franklin Roosevelt was warned that Japan was staging an attack on US soil.

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10 Ancient Sites That Might Be Stargates, Portals

Tiahuanaco, Bolivia, ‘Gate of the Sun’ Photo credit: Daniel Maciel Believed by some to be a portal to the land of the gods, the “Gate of the Sun” in Bolivia shares much of its legends with other similar sites in the Andes region. Tiahuanaco city is said to be one of the most important sites of ancient America, with legends stating that the Sun god, Viracocha, appeared in Tiahuanaco and made it “the place of creation”—the place he chose to start the human race.

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10 Diseases That Are Wiping Out Entire Species

Canine Distemper Dog owners have certainly heard of this one. Canine distemper is a very serious viral disease with no known cure. Incredibly contagious, it is spread through the air or merely by touch, and the virus will initially hide inside the body as a high fever before sharpening its claws and taking the life of the canine.

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10 Breathtaking Real Places Plucked Straight From

Baobab Boulevard The baobab tree is a bizarre plant species that can be found on the isolated African island of Madagascar. Dominated by its trunk, this incredibly tall, thick tree has only a few small leafy sections at the very top, causing many to refer to it as the “upside-down tree.” Individually, they are strange enough, but when grouped, the effect is pure fantasy fuel.

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Top 10 Loneliest Things In The World

The Lonely Island Of Hashima Photo credit: kntrty About 25 kilometers (15 mi) from Nagasaki, there’s an island that used to be home to over 5,000 people. Even when Hashima was populated, the island saw incredible brutality because conscripted civilians and prisoners of war were forced to work as slave laborers extracting coal from the mines there. But when Japan moved from coal to petroleum, there was no real point to keeping people on the island. So the coal mines closed down, and everyone who worked there moved away.

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15 Modern and Unusual Fruit Bowls/Holders

2. Stelton Embrace Fruit Bowl [amazon] Elegant designer fruit bowl. The embrace fruit bowl, which is made of stainless steel, has a tight, decorative expression, and it creates a nice contrast when it is full of fresh fruit. In addition to being a beautiful stand alone fruit bowl, this item can also be used with the Stelton bread bag, which fits perfectly into the bowl changing the look and adding the color of your choice to your decorative bowl.

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10 Odd Archaeological Finds That Tell Unexpected S

Etruscan Slab The supremely religious Etruscan culture imparted great knowledge to Greece and Rome and left behind an ugly alphabet. Sadly, we don’t know much of their language, and most of what we’ve gleaned comes from funerary stones or inscriptions on household knickknacks.

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10 Interestingly Outlandish Conspiracy Theories Ab

Ahnenerbe And The Hunt For Ancient Artifacts And Relics Photo credit: MessianicArt.com Although the Indiana Jones movies are complete fiction, their portrayal of the Nazis’ interest in ancient relics and artifacts is very much true. It is said that Hitler was obsessed with ancient texts and philosophies and that he made genuine, concerted efforts to bring into his possession such revered items as the Holy Grail, the Ark of the Covenant, and the Spear of Destiny.

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10 Amazing Ways Ancient Oceans Affect Our Lives To

The Ancient Oceans Were The Original Salt Shakers If we look in any kitchen “worth its salt,” the one seasoning that we would find just about everywhere would be salt. Used throughout history as a way to preserve food and give flavor to bland potatoes, this mineral owes its existence to the ancient oceans. Approximately 200 million years ago, the supercontinent of Pangaea started to break apart. The oceans that formed between the landmasses deposited evaporites over the next hundreds of millions of years. These evaporites included gypsum, anhydrite, and halite, to name a few. Halite, of course, is now known by most people as common table salt.

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10 Unimaginable & Horrific Botched Surgeries

Wrong Infant In 2016, Jennifer Melton gave birth to a healthy baby boy named Nate, who was delivered at the University Medical Center in Lebanon, Tennessee, near Nashville. Following the delivery, Nate was taken to another room for what his mother believed to be a routine checkup. A short time later, a nurse entered Jennifer’s room and explained that Nate was accidentally mistaken for another child and had undergone an unnecessary operation. The doctor had performed a frenulectomy, in which the flap of skin under the tongue is clipped. Such procedures are often performed when the skin is too tight, which can cause feeding and speech problems down the road, a condition often referred to as “tongue-tie.”

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10 Overlooked Or Obscure Animal Anatomical Details

Spiders Have Actual Mouths Photo credit: John Henry Comstock Like mantises, spiders are a well-known predators that are often portrayed incorrectly in entertainment. Even people fairly familiar with them might be under the impression that spiders feed directly through their two fangs like some sort of vampire, but the process is actually even stranger.

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10 Pairs of Commonly Confused Animals

Turtles/Tortoises This one is quite easy to remember once you know the difference. Turtles spend almost all of their lives in the water, and therefore have fins instead of stumps. Sea turtles live almost exclusively in the water, only occasionally venturing onto the sand to lay eggs. Freshwater turtles will sometimes climb onto rocks or banks near their rivers or ponds in order to soak up the sun. 

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10 Animals with Incredibly Long Lives

Koi Fish The average age a koi fish will live to is under 50 years old, which isn’t bad. But it’s not nearly good enough to make this list. Hanako, however, was a koi fish who died in 1977, at the much more respectable age of 226 years old, meaning she was born in 1751. That means she was around before Benjamin Franklin discovered electricity, or before anybody knew mammoths had ever existed. It means she was alive for the signing of the declaration of independence, the French revolution, both world wars, and so on. Her age was determined by counting rings on her scales, much like determining the age of a tree.

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10 Ghosts, Monsters, And Curses Of The American So

10 Ghosts, Monsters, And Curses Of The American South Benjamin Welton June 1, 2016 From bayous covered in Spanish moss to the rugged foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, the American South presents a legend-haunted landscape replete with many ghosts, ghouls, and monstrosities. Like the rest of America, the South is a repository of European, African, and Latin American folktales, all of which have been given a Southern flavor over the generations. Currently, the South is a hotbed of paranormal activity and supernatural sightings. Featured image credit: williamdefalco via YouTube 10 Two-Toed Tom By the time that University of Alabama professor Carl Carmer set down the legend of Two-Toed Tom in his book Stars Fell on Alabama, the creature was described as a “red-eyed hell-demon” that took the form of a 4-meter-long (14 ft) alligator. Although many locals on the Florida-Alabama line may claim that the legend is ancient, most accounts of Two-Toed Tom started circulating in the 1920s.

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10 Awe-Inspiring Unsung Heroes Of Devastating Atta

10 Awe-Inspiring Unsung Heroes Of Devastating Attacks Morris M. May 27, 2016 Turn on the news, and it can seem like we’re living in a dystopian nightmare. Terrorists are exploding bombs in airports. Gunmen are going on the rampage in schools. Chemical weapons are appearing in ISIS’s arsenal. At times like this, you’d be forgiven for thinking there was no good left in our world at all. Luckily, things aren’t as bleak as they seem. Even at the worst times, amid deepening divisions, there are still heroes. People who find themselves faced with unimaginable horror yet still manage to dig deep and do the right thing. Here are 10 people who stood up to death and destruction and, in doing so, proved that humanity is still capable of amazing actions. 10 The Bataclan Savior Photo credit: The White House On November 13, 2015, the world was shaken by the worst terror attack that Europe had seen in a decade. Gunmen and bombers attacked Paris, claiming 130 lives—more than the 2011 Norway attack and Britain’s 7/7 combined.

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10 Otherworldly Sea Creatures You’ve Never Heard O

Hooded Nudibranchs The hooded or “lion” nudibranchs of the order Melibe are like the Venus flytraps of the sea slug world, their huge mouths flaring into nets lined with tooth-like sticky tentacles.

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10 Bizarre Claims Of Alien/Human Hybrids

Miguel Mendonca’s Proof Of Alien Hybrids Miguel Mendonca is a leading expert on green energy and renewable power sources. He is also convinced that aliens are in the process of helping humans evolve into “higher beings” by implanting their DNA into pregnant women around the Earth.

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10 Astounding Natural Phenomena Caught On Film

Asperatus Clouds Asperatus clouds are a fairly new classification, having only been photographed in the last 30 years. These clouds give the sky the appearance of an ocean’s waves with their constant flowing motion, and although they appear menacing, they usually dissipate without any kind of a storm. Since they are such a recent discovery, scientists are unsure of the causes behind them. There are currently studies being done to gather evidence on what kinds of weather conditions are needed for asperatus clouds to appear.

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10 Eerie Theories On What Happens Inside A Black H

Time Travel The greatest physicists to ever grace this humble planet of ours, like Einstein and Hawking, have theorized that time traveling into the future is possible by abusing the ethereal laws of a black hole. As previously mentioned, the laws of physics are null inside a black hole, and a new set of laws are put into place. One thing that is excruciatingly different in a black hole compared to our world is time. Gravity warps time, and a black hole is essentially a massive gravitational body.

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10 Impressively Futuristic Recent Medical Breakthr

10 Impressively Futuristic Recent Medical Breakthroughs Mike Floorwalker June 6, 2016 .promote, .contributor {display:none;} Those of us who lived a substantial portion of our lives before the turn of the century used to think of our current time period as the far, far distant future. Because we grew up on films like Blade Runner (which is set in 2019), we tend to be a little unimpressed with how un-future-y the future has turned out to be—from an aesthetic perspective, at least. Well, while the perpetually promised flying car may never actually

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10 Things You Didn’t Know About Organ Transplantat

Religious Concerns Organ transplants have not been around for a terribly long time, so for many religious people, the rules for how to ethically deal with this new medical procedure are not very cut and dried. In the Islamic faith, most spiritual leaders have come out in favor of organ transplantation but it has only done so much good. Many individuals are still wary due to religious laws on how to treat corpses and perform burial rites. This has led to a situation where the overwhelming majority of organ transplants in countries like Iran are taken from living donors so as not to offend religious sensibilities. Christians and Catholics are for the most part okay with the practice, but not all religions agree.

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10 Fascinating Theories Regarding The Ancient Sea

The Sicilian Connection Photo credit: Soprani Following the age of the Sea Peoples, the island of Sicily was divided between three major tribes—the Elymians, the Sicani, and the Siculi (sometimes referred to as the Sicels). While the Sicani were indigenous to the island, the Elymians are believed to have originally come from Asia Minor and had deep connections to the Greek city-states of the Aegean Sea. The Sicels, on the other hand, were likely an Italic tribe from the mainland. All three tribes may have connections to the Sea Peoples, but it is believed that marauders from Sicily were part of the invasions by the Sea Peoples. Specifically, these Sicilian pirates were called the Shekelesh by the Egyptians.

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10 Animals That Surprisingly Benefit From Climate

Pine Beetles In 2008, Jeffry Mitton and Scott Ferrenberg surveyed the pine trees found in Niwot Ridge in Colorado. While hiking the forest in mid-June, they encountered something strange—a swarm of adult pine beetles. Mitton, who is an evolutionary geneticist from the University of Colorado, found this phenomenon to be odd, since the insects were supposed to come out in August or September, not June.

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Top 10 Bizarre Genetically Modified Organisms

Umbuku Lizard This creature is the only one on the list which was not designed for a practical reason, but merely to prove that it could be done. Genetic Engineers in Zimbabwe (formerly Rhodesia) managed to unlock a dormant “flying” strand in the DNA of the Umbuku lizard, a very small and rare lizard native to Africa.

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10 Of The Biggest Branches Missing From The Animal

Helicoplacoids Photo credit: J.W. Durham The helicoplacoids are known only from the Lower Cambrian period, 525 million years ago. They were some of the first echinoderms, the group that includes modern-day starfishes and sea cucumbers. Helicoplacoids resembled tiny, 3- to 7-centimeter-long (1.2–2.8 in) armored footballs that could stretch and contract their bodies. They had bizarre feeding grooves which spiraled along the lengths of their bodies and were some of the first animals with skeletons.

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10 Alleged Underwater Alien UFO Bases

10 Alleged Underwater Alien UFO Bases Marcus Lowth June 13, 2016 Sometimes referred to as USOs (Unidentified Submerged Objects) or UUOs (Unidentified Underwater Objects), sightings of strange lights and crafts emerging from, or descending into, the seas, oceans, and lakes around the world are quite widespread. Some UFO researchers and investigators even claim that there are underwater alien bases present in the vicinity of these aquatic sightings. Here are 10 of the most interesting claims. Underwater Base Off The Coast Of Malibu Photo credit: Fade to Black via YouTube California has been a UFO hot spot for years, so when it was theorized that a structure discovered 600 meters (2,000 ft) below the water 10 kilometers (6 mi) off the coast of Malibu was in fact an alien base, it didn’t come as that much of a surprise. The structure has a distinct oval shape and what appears to be flat top. It measures approximately 5 kilometers (3 mi) wide, and there also seem to be pillars holding up the main “roof” of the mysterious anomaly. These pillars look to be spaced evenly apart, almost as if it were an entrance of sorts.

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10 Futuristic Technologies That Are Revolutionizin

Smart Glass Photo credit: Shtiever Durable, bendable, smart . . . glass? Indeed, we may arguably be entering the “Age of Glass.” With the ability to change from clear to opaque, bend without shattering, and even act as a touch screen, the new glass which is being created could change our homes and workplaces forever. Our new walls could also act as windows, controlling UV light and heat and allowing for more energy-efficient homes and vehicles. Imagine if every surface in your home was smart, able to transform from a wall to a window to a television screen, all with the wave of your hand. These new technologies are creating an image of the future that is crystal clear.

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Top 10 Close Encounters Of The Sixth Kind

Valentich UFO Encounter And Disappearance What has to be one of the most disturbing and mysterious disappearances of pilot and plane happened on October 21, 1978, when a young Australian pilot reported an encounter with an aggressive UFO. No trace was ever found of Frederick Valentich, the 20-year-old pilot who vanished into thin air after radioing in that he was in danger and being harassed by a UFO.

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Top 10 Fascinating Insect Impostors

Periodical Cicada Impostor In science, there’s a name for almost everything. Periodical cicadas are no exception. They’re called “periodical” because, unlike most of their kind, nearly all of them in the same area mature during the same year. They also live underground for years at a time, sucking tree juices from roots, whereas annual cicadas “surface each summer.” Periodical cicadas aren’t locusts (pictured above), although they are frequently confused with them. For one thing, periodical cicadas don’t bite, and they don’t devour acres of crops. In addition, periodical cicadas actually benefit both man’s best friend and wild animals.

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10 Fascinating Theories To Explain Déjà Vu

Familiarity-Based Recognition When we recognize a stimulus in our environment, we are using our “recognition memory” which comes in two forms: familiarity and recollection. Recollection memory is when we recall seeing something which we have seen before (such as recognizing someone who lives on your street in a local store). This is our brain retrieving and applying true information which we have encoded into our memory.

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10 Implausible Technologies From Fiction That Are

Lightsabers No, really, and yes, this is only number 9. Scientists “accidentally” created a “photonic molecule“—heretofore thought impossible because photons (particles of light) have no mass. By creating a unique medium in which photons interact strongly with each other (as opposed to passing right through each other, per nature), they were able to get the photons to bond . . . forming an (as yet subatomic) new form of matter made out of light.

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10 Incredible Things Animals Can Do That We Can’t

Defy Gravity   We all know that birds have the ability to fly, which is an obvious trait that we as humans lack. But what about a creature with no wings that is able to defy gravity, too? Meet the Alpine ibex goat. Just looking at him, you might not be impressed but wait until you hear what he can do. Ibex goats have the incredible ability to run up hills that are almost perfectly vertical. Not only that but they can hold their balance on the tiniest of ledges.

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10 Things Found in Unexpected Historic Time Period

Nazi Salutes In 1930s American Schools A gang of Jewish-American schoolchildren being encouraged to give a Nazi salute to the Stars and Stripes in the 1930s sounds like a badly misjudged joke from an edgy, racial comedy. But that’s exactly what this photo shows. Taken in 1933 or 1934, it comes from a time when Mussolini had been doing the salute for over a decade and Hitler was just starting to climb onto the world stage.

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10 Perplexing New Types Of Astronomic Entities

New Type Of Possibly Extinct Space Rock Photo credit: Birger Schmitz Oest 65, an ancient alien space-rock rich in iridium and neon, is unlike anything else in our collection of 50,000 cosmic souvenirs. In fact, it may be of a type we’ll never see again, since astronomers believe that brutal collisions reduced its parent body to dust.

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10 Scientific Projects Where Men Played God

Recreating Interstellar Dust Photo credit: NASA/Ames Research Center Understanding the composition and evolution of the universe is one of the major objectives of NASA. In its quest to fully comprehend the universe, NASA faced one big challenge—creating interstellar and planetary materialsin a laboratory setting. This has been a major challenge for many decades. However, in 2014, NASA made a significant breakthrough. By playing God, they were able to create interstellar dust.

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10 More Fascinating Real-World Easter Eggs

The Clown Motel Photo credit: Will Keightley Located in the middle of a giant desert off a lonely highway, the tiny former mining town of Tonopah, Nevada, is pretty much exactly where you would expect to find a creepy motel. It’s the sort of motel you’d be reluctant to stay in for fear of a terminal case of the willies, at the very least. But Tonopah’s aptly named Clown Motel is the sort of creepy place that would make a certain type of person—the type who can’t even look at the picture accompanying this entry—floor the gas pedal and speed off screaming into the night.

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10 Moons Humans Could Colonize

Mimas Photo credit: NASA Known as the “Death Star” moon, Saturn’s icy, rocky moon Mimas may have an ocean beneath its otherwise unwelcoming surface, which may in fact be suitable for life. Examination of the Cassini footage by scientists revealed that Mimas appeared to rock back and forth as it went around on its orbit. This could suggest activity beneath its surface. Although scientists were very cautious with their findings, noting that there hadn’t been any other signs of geological activity, they stated if an ocean was discovered, the moon should certainly be considered a possibility for colonization. It’s estimated the possible ocean would be around 24 to 29 kilometers (15–18 mi) beneath the surface.

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10 Things Our Brain Does Without Us Thinking About

Deceiving Us Into Thinking We’re Better Imagine you have a child who really wants to be an artist, and they bring you a simply awful drawing which they seem to be very proud of. What do you say to them? Most parents would complement the drawing, even if they don’t believe what they’re saying. However, when the child grows up, they may look at the drawing and be horrified that anyone could ever have considered it to be good. When somebody gives us positive feedback, we build a belief that we fit the criteria we are described as. This changes our perspective of ourselves, meaning that we believe we’re better than we actually are.

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Top 10 Unintended Consequences Of Prohibition

  Prohibition Criminalized Everyday People The apparent assumption that the vast majority of people would simply abstain from alcohol once Prohibition was enacted couldn’t have been more wide of the mark. It should be noted that consuming alcohol during prohibition was not illegal, nor was possession of it. The manufacturing, transportation, and sale of alcohol were. This lack of clarity led to several loopholes and gray areas, and they were exploited, unwittingly or not. There was particular ambiguity regarding making wine at home for one’s own pleasure and enjoyment, for example. The equipment used to do so was widely and openly for sale in stores across the US, and information on how to make homemade wine was available in most public libraries. Technically, however, making wine in your own home was illegal during prohibition. Pharmacists and religious organizations were also exempt from Prohibition due to alcohol being used as medicine and in ceremonies, respectively. Many pharmacies suddenly sprung up, often no more than a front for their real intentions, while many churches experienced a surge in membership. Alcohol that had been purchased prior to the start of Prohibition was technically legal and allowed to be stored and consumed in a person’s home. However, carrying that alcohol from one place to another was illegal, and should a person not be able to prove the alcohol was purchased prior to prohibition, they were at risk of arrest.

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Top 10 Significant First Fossils

First Reptile And Land Animal Hylonomus lyelli Photo credit: Ghedoghedo Hylonomus lyelli, which lived 315 million years ago during the late Carboniferous period, is the first known reptile to exist. In addition, it is the first creature known to have adapted to life completely on land. During this time period, also known as the Coal Age or the Pennsylvanian, Hylonomus grew to around 20 centimeters (8 in) in length including the tail. Chiefly insectivores, these reptiles were lizard-like and probably fed on small prey such as snails, millipedes, and other small insects.

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10 Fascinating Facts About The Human Skeleton

10 Fascinating Facts About The Human Skeleton CHRISTOPHER M. STEPHENS JULY 11, 2016 The skeleton might seem less dynamic than many of the human body’s other organ systems. Yet, the skeleton has many remarkable physical attributes that help it to support the human body as well as some truly remarkable biochemical attributes that regulate the functioning of the body. Here, we take the skeleton out of the closet for closer examination. 10The Skeleton Influences Sugar Metabolism Photo credit: Robert M. Hunt The skeleton is actually part of the endocrine system and a regulator of sugar metabolism, and it influences the manner in which certain fats are metabolized in the body. In 2007, researchers at the Columbia University Medical Center determined that human bone cells regulate blood sugar levels and fat deposition through secretion of the hormone osteocalcin. Osteocalcin increases insulin secretion, but without the decrease in insulin sensitivity that is normally seen in association with increased insulin secretion. Furthermore, osteocalcin boosts the number of insulin-producing pancreatic B-cells. The chemical also mitigates the storage of fat. It has become clear that the skeleton is an important metabolic regulator with a strong influence on how our bodies regulate the metabolism of sugar as well as weight gain and loss.

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10 Beautiful Types of Rainbows by May Ram

Alexander’s Dark Band Alexander’s Band is technically not a rainbow, but it is associated with the primary and secondary rainbows. An Alexander’s band is the area of sky between the primary and secondary rainbow and it is noticeably darker than the rest of the sky. The single reflected light of the primary brightens the sky inside and the double reflected light of the secondary brightens the sky outside of it. To our eyes, it appears that the sky is darker between the primary and secondary rainbows.

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10 Fascinating Examples Of Convergent Evolution

Slime Mold And Water Mold Photo credit: Red58bill/Wikimedia On the surface, we are inclined to perceive very little difference between different types of mold. But it turns out that not only are there two distinct types—slime mold and water mold—but they are in fact two completely different types of organisms. The reason they are so difficult to tell apart is because of convergence. The mold that we generally think of is slime mold, a land-based organism that dwells on surfaces, such as rocks, trees or a week-old sandwich. It consumes microorganisms—really any biological substance it comes into contact with. Once feeding conditions become unfavorable, the cells, which reproduce through cell division during the feeding stage, can actually come together to form a mass that can move as one organism and looks something like a slug.

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10 Scientific Hints Of Possible Higher Beings

Godel’s Ontological Proof Photo credit: Kurt Godel In the 1940s, physicist Kurt Godel tried to prove the existence of God with the mathematical proof above. It is based on this argument by Saint Anselm of Canterbury: 1. There is a great being called God, and nothing greater than God can be imagined.

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10 Extraordinary Discoveries That Weren’t

Italians Thought As Neanderthals Photo credit: seeker.com In the 1980s, a group of archaeologists discovered a few fragmentary bones in the San Bernardino Cave in Italy. They discovered the remains in a rock layer estimated to be around 28,000–59,000 years old, leading them to conclude that the bones belonged to Neanderthals.

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10 Fascinating Historic Architectural Features

Cartouches Photo credit: Nefermaat /Wikimedia A cartouche is an elaborate, often scrolled design made of metal, stone, or wood that became an important architectural feature in the 16th century. Some say that it developed from flattened oval shapes used for highlighting ancient Egyptian royalty names. From then on, cartouche designs have had many functions and surrounded anything from important messages and coats of arms to landscape and genre paintings both in architecture and decorative arts.

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10 Archaeological Sites Suffering From Climate

Sonargaon Photo credit: Sourav Das Sonargaon was the capital of the ancient kingdom of Bengal. It was the seat of power of Isa Khan during the 15th century and was a vibrant political and trading center during its peak. Today, Sonargaon, which is located in present-day Bangladesh, has been relegated to a tourist attraction. People marvel at its Mughal, Sultanate, and colonial architecture.

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10 Archaeological Sites Suffering Fr... by May Ram

10 Archaeological Sites Suffering From Climate Change Paul Jongko July 24, 2016 When we hear the term “climate change,” we often think of its negative impact on animals, plants, and mankind. However, we fail to realize that it’s not only the living that are threatened by changes in the climate. Even archaeological sites—the windows to our past—are suffering from the devastating effects of the current warming trend. Chinguetti Photo credit: Francois Colin

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10 Archaeological Sites Sufferi... by user37749302

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10 Archaeological Sites Suffe...

10 Archaeological Sites Suffering From Climate Change Paul Jongko July 24, 2016 When we hear the term “climate change,” we often think of its negative impact on animals, plants, and mankind. However, we fail to realize that it’s not only the living that are threatened by changes in the climate. Even archaeological sites—the windows to our past—are suffering from the devastating effects of the current warming trend. Chinguetti Photo credit: Francois Colin

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10 Amazing Ways Pluto Is Alive

Pluto’s Spider Photo credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI Part of the dwarf planet is covered by what looks like a spider, extending six giant legs across the surface in a network of cracks unlike anything in the outer solar system. The smaller cracks are an impressive 100 kilometers (60 mi) long, but the largest, Sleipnir Fossa (named after the eight-legged horse of Norse lore), goes on for over 580 kilometers (360 mi).

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10 Space Discoveries Made By Amateur Astronomers

10 Space Discoveries Made By Amateur Astronomers Marcus Lowth July 30, 2016 Partly due to a limited budget, partly due to the sheer vastness of space, amateur astronomers are increasingly being recognized for their important contribution to what we know and understand of the universe. With home telescopes increasing in ability and decreasing in cost, more and more people are taking to watching the skies at night. Some of these amateur astronomers have made some truly historic and important discoveries over the years. Here are 10 of them. Michael Sidonio Discovers Galaxy From Farmers Field 2013 Photo credit: Michael Sidonio While photographing the NGC 253 galaxy from a field in Canberra, Australia, in 2013, Michael Sidonio noticed something in the shot that he had not seen before. And it turned out that nobody had ever seen it before, as it was discovered to be another galaxy—which, once verified, was named “NGC 253-dw2.” The discovery of this particular galaxy is an important one for scientists as it is a smaller galaxy that appears to be in the process of being destroyed by its larger neighbor. Studying this new galaxy should allow scientists to have visual proof that larger galaxies are indeed formed from their smaller counterparts.

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10 Obscure Tales From The History Of Nuclear Testi

Operation Argus Photo credit: US Department of Energy Operation Argus, conducted in 1958 off the coast of South Africa, was the only secret aboveground nuclear test ever conducted by the United States. Operation Argus sought to test the scientific theories of physicist Nicholas Christofilos, who proposed that charged particles from nuclear explosions in space could create artificial radiation belts around the Earth.

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10 Incredible Robots That Mimic Animals

RoboBees In the last decade or so, the honeybee population has rather suddenly and mysteriously fallen victim to Colony Collapse Disorder. The population has seen drastic yearly reductions, and nobody is sure exactly why. In June 2014, Harvard researchers came up with a potential means to help alleviate the effects of CCD while a more permanent one is found: tiny robot bees, which may soon be capable of carrying out crop pollination.

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10 Tragic Facts From The Dawn Of Aviation

10 Tragic Facts From The Dawn Of Aviation Adam R. Ramos August 11, 2016 For thousands of years, man has been eager to take to the skies and reach for the stars. From the days of hot air balloons all the way to stepping foot on the Moon, human beings have accomplished glorious feats, achieving more than one has ever envisioned. But such success required not only great courage and skill but enormous sacrifice that paved the way for modern aviation. The following 10 cases are not only the first of their kind but detail unfortunate events that ended tragically while attempting to make an imprint on history. Yuan Huangtou Photo credit: Dr. Richard Neuhauss The first recorded use for a planar surface flight occurred in the year 559 AD in China when a young prince by the name of Yuan Huangtou of Ye soared more than 2.5 kilometers (1.5 mi) while strapped to a man-made kite. Those who had witnessed the event were left in astonishment, bewildered that something that had been built by man could carry a human through the air for such a long distance.

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10 Desert Animals With Brilliant Survival Adaptati

Brewer’s Sparrow Photo credit: www.naturespicsonline.com A remarkable application of basic chemistry allows the drab-looking Brewer’s sparrow to survive in deserts where life-giving water is in extremely short supply. Birds typically obtain the majority of their water through soft, wet plant foods, water sipped through the bill from leaves and streams, or the blood and tissue of animal prey. for much of the year, the desert-dwelling Brewer’s sparrow of North America does not have many luxuries or options when it comes to water sources. This bird feeds largely on seeds which are exceedingly poor in water content but contain carbohydrates. When broken apart, carbohydrates reduce to carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. When the latter two elements are broken away from carbon and reunited, dihydrogen monoxide (H20), or water, results.

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Alleged Discoveries That Suggest Giants Existed

Alleged Discoveries That Suggest Giants Existed Marcus Lowth May 7, 2016 Stories of giants are littered throughout mythology and folklore. Almost every culture and society has tales of gigantic people who once roamed the Earth. However, over the last 200 years or so, and particularly since the early 20th century, there have been many alleged finds of giant skeletal remains or fossilized footprints, possibly suggesting that the tales of giants are more than pure legend. All of these accounts also carry an air of conspiracy about them, with insinuations of the discoveries being “covered up” and dismissed thereafter. Are they all hoaxes, or are there more to these stories than we might think? Here are 10 alleged “giant” discoveries. Giant Bones Found At Lake Delavan Wisconsin, 1912 According to a report that ran in The New York Times on May 4, 1912, 18 gigantic skeletons, buried in charcoal and baked clay, were found at Lake Delavan in Wisconsin. The discovery was made by the Phillips brothers while excavating a burial mound. They were presumed to be the remains of an unknown race of people who once called the area home. Although they appeared to be very much human, there were some noticeable differences aside from their much larger size. The bone above the eye socket sloped straight back, and the nose appeared to be much higher than the cheekbones as opposed to being more or less in line with them. The jawbones themselves were described as “bearing a minute resemblance to the head of the monkey!”

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10 Discoveries Made Possible By Laser Scans

The Tallest Tropical Tree Photo credit: Lim Chin Huang Players of Minecraft are pretty familiar with the Yellow Meranti tree. But in real life, these trees remain largely unknown and are sadly endangered. Just recently, a team of researchers discovered the tallest Yellow Meranti tree in a forest in Malaysia. It is nearly 89 meters (294 ft) tall—the same height as that “of 20 British double-decker buses stacked up.” Aside from being the tallest Yellow Meranti, this tree is also considered as the tallest known tropical tree.

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10 Recent Whimsical Scientific Discoveries

Meteorite Surprise Photo credit: H. Downes One of the most intriguing questions about the first couple billion years or so of our planet’s

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10 Little-Known Stunning Natural Wonders

Valle de la Luna Chile Finding yourself in the Valle de la Luna you would be easily forgiven for thinking you have miraculously landed on the moon! An impressive range of textures and colours in the area (formed by wind and water) and the dry lakes which look like craters give this an ethereal other-worldly feel.

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10 Foods That Exist Because Of Ancient Genetic Eng

10 Foods That Exist Because Of Ancient Genetic Engineering Bridget O'Ryan August 22, 2016 “GMO” foods may seem like a modern phenomenon, made possible only because of well-funded labs and genome analysis. What most consumers don’t realize is that most of humanity’s crops were already genetically modified thousands of years ago. In almost all cases, our favorite fruits and vegetables were engineered to be fundamentally different from their wild ancestors. Almonds The almonds we eat today are a domesticated variety derived from several species of wild almonds, all of which are bitter, spiny, and contain deadly amounts of cyanide. In the wild, almond trees produce a sugary compound and an enzyme that inevitably combine into cyanide when the edible parts of the plant are chewed up. The identities of the specific strains used to create modern almonds are unknown. However, it is clear that humans selected and interbred the sweetest varieties of bitter almonds until the nuts were edible. This is quite a feat, considering that eating a dozen or so of the toxic kind would kill whoever had the task of testing out the newest crops. Luckily, the mutation that halts cyanide production is a dominant one, and almonds quickly became a popular treat.

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10 Freaky True Stories That Inspired ‘The X-Files’

‘Folie A Deux’ Shared Insanity Photo credit: Channel 5 Broadcasting Ltd The Episode: A telemarketer takes his coworkers hostage at gunpoint because he thinks his boss is a giant bug, a monster that “hides in the light.” Even Mulder is uncharacteristically logical about the case . . . until he begins to see the bug, too. Mulder attacks the man’s boss and gets sent to a psych hospital, where the killer bug continues to stalk him. However, in this case, the bug turns out to be real.

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10 Things You Never Knew Were Invented By Kids

George Nissen Trampoline Photo credit: Tim Blake In 1930, after graduating high school at the age of 16, gymnast George Nissen didn’t feel like going to college quite yet. After visiting the circus and seeing how the trapeze artists could fall into a net that provided them with some bounce. He played around with different materials.

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10 Discoveries In Amber That Change Our View Of Pr

Oxygen Mystery Photo credit: USGS Bubbles trapped in amber alerted scientists to an intriguing mystery. The ancient time capsules were collected from 16 sites across the world and had their bubbles zapped with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The air trapped within revealed that dinosaurs breathed an atmosphere that was much richer with oxygen than today.

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Top 10 Fascinating Facts About Fear

Spare Fear Center Photo credit: John A Beal Since fear is so important to survival, nature made sure the brain’s fear center, the amygdala, has a backup. For some time, researchers knew that when damaged, another part of the brain took over its job. Tests determined that this part is the bed nuclei. Rats with an impaired amygdala froze in the electrified cages they’ve been taught to fear, like normal brained rats. But those who had a damaged amygdala and bed nuclei showed a significant failure when remembering dangers.

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It’s Really Contagious

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10 Ways We Are Being Watched, Monitored And Spied

10 Ways We Are Being Watched, Monitored And Spied On Marcus Lowth August 30, 2016 While the intent might be up for debate, the fact that our governments and businesses appear to be watching our every move isn’t. As technology increases, seemingly more and more rapidly, more data about us is stored and shared—and most of the time, we are unaware it is being collected or how it might be used. Increasing CCTV Surveillance In 2011, there was one CCTV camera for every 32 UK citizens. By 2016, this number had increased to one for every 11, making the United Kingdom the most spied upon country in the world. Not that the UK is alone in its surveillance of citizens. Almost all countries have security cameras in place. In 2013, the BBC ran a story about the increasing numbers of CCTV cameras being installed and put into operation across the United States, where they were being hailed as crucial in apprehending the culprits of the Boston bombing. That is why these cameras are put in place, and there are plenty of examples of them being used to good effect. There increasing numbers, however, make some people uneasy, and the line between security and the infringement on privacy is becoming grayer all the time.

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10 Mind-Blowing Things That Happened Last Month

Apple Got Smashed With €13 Billion In Unpaid Taxes Photo credit: Anthony Sigalas On August 30, the EU closed a two-year investigation into Apple’s tax arrangements with Ireland. The commission concluded that Apple had received state aid from Dublin, allowing the corporation to pay as little as 0.005 percent tax on profits. Such a “sweetheart deal” is illegal under EU Law. Brussels has previously investigated companies such as Starbucks and countries such as Luxembourg, but the scale of the fine handed out to Apple dwarfs all other cases. The EU ordered the company to cough up €13 billion ($14.5 billion).

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10 Profound Ways The World Will Change In Your Lif

10 Profound Ways The World Will Change In Your Lifetime Alan Boyle December 15, 2013 Society and culture can change beyond recognition in a lifetime—people with criminal convictions for homosexuality are today seeing gay marriage become legal. A bunch of you are reading this on a multifunctional device that would outperform any supercomputer from 20 years ago, and when you’re finished, you’ll put it in your pocket. The great physicist Niels Bohr is said to have written, “Prediction is very difficult, especially about the future.” As correct as that may be, the world will definitely evolve in the next few decades, and we’ve got a good idea just how some of those changes will play out. A Cash-Free Economy Cash has had a long history (going through some odd iterations before we got it to the coins and paper we know today). Yet its importance has faded dramatically since this whole computer thing took off. You can now use your smart phone to pay at a vending machine, and cash is looking increasingly archaic and cumbersome.

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10 Controversial Theories Supported By Compelling

How Buckyballs Are Formed Photo credit: NASA/JPL via Popular Science Fullerenes, commonly called “buckyballs,” are hollow carbon structures shaped like soccer balls. They form naturally at a molecular level. The more widely accepted “bottom up” theory says that they come together one atom at a time, like building a Lego model. The more controversial “bottom down” theory suggests that they result from the breakdown of larger atomic structures. For the first time, the underdog theory has serious support in the form of newly discovered, asymmetrical versions of buckyballs that are indeed formed from larger structures and appear to be in mid-transition.

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MURDER, MAYHEM And MEDICINE

Nanocage surfaces get 'makeover' at room temperature Nanocrystals morph via anion exchange by exploiting crystal structure Date:March 24, 2016Source:Kyoto UniversitySummary:Engineers have exploited preexisting crystal 'molds' to make copper oxide nanocrystals morph into hollow copper sulfide nanocages through anion exchange, and ultimately into cadmium sulfide and zinc sulfide nanocages. FULL STORY Kyoto University team exploit preexisting crystal "molds" to make copper oxide nanocrystals morph into hollow copper sulfide nanocages through anion exchange, and ultimately into cadmium sulfide and zinc sulfide nanocages. Credit: Kyoto University Kyoto University researchers have discovered a way of replacing surface ions of copper oxide nanocrystals at ambient conditions -- a feat that will make nanocage production considerably simpler.

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Science Daily News

Brains are different in people with highly superior autobiographical memory Date:July 30, 2012Source:University of California - IrvineSummary:Scientists have discovered intriguing differences in the brains and mental processes of an extraordinary group of people who can effortlessly recall every moment of their lives since about age 10. FULL STORY   UC Irvine scientists have discovered intriguing differences in the brains and mental processes of an extraordinary group of people who can effortlessly recall every moment of their lives since about age 10. Credit: © James Steidl / Fotolia UC Irvine scientists have discovered intriguing differences in the brains and mental processes of an extraordinary group of people who can effortlessly recall every moment of their lives since about age 10.

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Top 10 Things That Could Actually Be The Holy Grai

Top 10 Things That Could Actually Be The Holy Grail Thiago Sanchez September 4, 2016 From King Arthur to the Crusaders to the Nazis, everybody has been trying to find the Holy Grail for the past 2,000 years without success—or at least that’s what we think. After all, who decides whether something is actually the Holy Grail? Furthermore, if we describe the Holy Grail simply as an ancient artifact associated closely with Jesus, then it doesn’t necessarily have to be a cup. Based on that logic, here is a list of 10 artifacts that could be regarded in some way as the Holy Grail. Featured image credit: ribbonfarm The James Ossuary Photo credit: Paradiso Discovered in Israel, the controversial James Ossuary is an ancient limestone box for storing bones which is inscribed with the words, “James, son of Joseph, brother of Jesus” in Aramaic. Immediately, this seemed improbable, especially when it turned up in the hands of an antiques dealer rather than from an excavation site. The dealer was taken to court by the Israel Antiquities Authority but was found not guilty of forgery.

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10 Recent Discoveries That Shed New Light On Ancie

The Minoans Were Indigenous Europeans Photo credit: Sci-News.com For many years, the origin of the ancient Minoan civilization was fiercely debated by scholars. Some suggested that they originated from Africa, specifically Egypt and Libya. Others believed that they came from the Middle East and Anatolia. In 2013, this debate was finally put to rest when Professor George Stamatoyannopoulos from the University of Washington published a study that revealed that the ancient Minoans were indigenous Europeans.

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Health, Food And Drinks

Cucumber Salad With Asian Flavors Martha Rose Shulman YieldServes 4 Time20 minutes         The trick to any sliced cucumber salad is to slice the cucumbers as thin as you can and to purge them by salting them before making the salad so the dressing doesn’t get watered down by the cucumber juice. Featured in: New Uses For Cucumbers.    Learn: Basic Knife Skills                           Ingredients

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10 Discoveries That Show Our Ancestors’ Obsession

The Antikythera Mechanism   Photo credit: Tilemahos Efthimiadis The Antikythera Mechanism, named for the Greek island it was discovered near,

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10 Ways The World’s Religions Have Sworn To Protec

The Dalai Lama Urged Buddhists To Protect Muslims Photo credit: Wikimedia In 2014, an outbreak of violence against Muslims spread across Myanmar and Sri Lanka. These were countries that were primarily Buddhist, and when news of terrorist attacks spread, the people got frightened—and got violent. 250 Muslims died, and another 140,000 were chased out of their homes. The Dalai Lama himself spoke out against the Buddhists’ actions. “Before [you] commit such a crime,” he told the people of the two nations, “imagine an image of Buddha.” The Dalai Lama explained that no part of Buddha’s teachings or life condoned these attacks.

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10 Innovative Applications For Virtual Reality

Marketing Photo credit: Evan-Amos With ads becoming more ubiquitous and intrusive thanks to the Internet, most consumer-oriented applications related to marketing now aim to remove these ads. But many in the marketing industry feel that VR could be the first major technology to make ads, well, cool. Google has led the charge with their Cardboard device—stereo lenses mounted in an actual cardboard viewer that users fold themselves (and which looks like a homemade View-Master). Cardboard works with smartphones and can be used to view VR content easily and cheaply.

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Dessert by May Ram

Dessert Honey Cheesecake   A Delicious Dessert Using Honey! When we think of honey, we think of sweetness and that goes hand in hand with dessert! Honey is a great additive for many different desserts as it gives natural sweetness to the dish. A decadent, sweet dessert that many people enjoy is cheesecake, and it is possible to infuse the right kind of sweetness into this creamy dish using honey. This Honey Cheesecake recipe is the perfect sweet dessert to end a meal and combines the sweetness of honey with the tartness of raspberries! INGREDIENTS FOR HONEY CHEESECAKE:

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10 Delicious Desserts You Can Make In 5 Minutes

5 Minute Caramelized Pecans This tasty pecan dessert makes your home taste like Christmas. It is also a more healthy option than some of the others on this list. Delicious! Ingredients

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What is your memory style?

What is your memory style? Tndency to remember episodic details versus facts is reflected in intrinsic brain patterns Date:December 10, 2015Source:Baycrest Centre for Geriatric CareSummary:Why is it that some people have richly detailed recollection of past experiences (episodic memory), while others tend to remember just the facts without details (semantic memory)? A research team has shown for the first time that these different ways of experiencing the past are associated with distinct brain connectivity patterns that may be inherent to the individual and suggest a life-long 'memory trait'. FULL STORY Two brain slices show different memory traits. Credit: Rotman Research Institute   Why is it that some people have richly detailed recollection of past experiences (episodic memory), while others tend to remember just the facts without details (semantic memory)?

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10 Mysterious Human Populations

Ice Age Invaders Photo credit: L. Lang Most believed Europe was populated in three waves: hunter-gathers, farmers from the Middle East, and pastoralists from the steppe. Recent genetic tests reveal a fourth wave. Around 14,500 BC, an invading population of hunter-gatherers replaced the earlier one.

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10 Entrances To Hell That You Can Visit

Fengdu City Of Ghosts Photo credit: Gisling/Wikimedia On Ming Mountain in China, a complex of temples and shrines has grown. All have some association with the afterlife and those seeking to reach it. The mountain gained its link to hell when two seekers after wisdom, Yin and Wang, went there to follow Toaist teachings. They became wise immortals, but it is the joining of their name which led to the City of Ghosts being built—Yinwang means “king of hell.”

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35 Quick-and-Easy Dessert Recipes

35 Quick-and-Easy Dessert Recipes Serve up no-fuss homemade desserts with our quick recipes for both warm and cold sweet treats. Find easy recipes for crisps, bar cookies, cake, cupcakes, cheesecake and more. Quick Cherry Crisp Crumbled shortbread cookies and toasted pecans top succulent red cherries in this easy-to-make dessert. Crumbled shortbread cookies and toasted pecans top succulent red cherries in this easy-to-make dessert. Ingredients 1/3-1/2 cup sugar 1 tablespoon cornstarch 4 cups frozen unsweetened pitted tart red cherries 1 cup crumbled shortbread cookies 2 tablespoons butter or margarine, melted 1/4 cup chopped pecans or almonds, toasted     Ice cream (optional)

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10 Answers To Baffling Questions You’ve Always Won

10 Answers To Baffling Questions You’ve Always Wondered About Nathan P. Gibson September 27, 2014 There are certain questions that burn in the back of your mind throughout your life. You might wonder why something is built in a certain way, why a particular item is always in a specific location, or why your body does something. Yet you’ve never been able to come up with a logical answer to these common questions despite knowing that there must be one. Below are 10 questions that have baffled people every day, along with the simple answers that finally provide closure. Why Do Airplanes Have Ashtrays When Smoking Is Banned? Smoking on airplanes is banned by pretty much every airline in the world. Apart from the fact that cigarette smoke is unpleasant for others passengers, smoking is also a fire hazard, possibly even responsible for the downing of Varig Flight 820.

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10 Incredible Stories Of Survival In The Arctic

10 Incredible Stories Of Survival In The Arctic Mark Oliver September 29, 2016 Few people choose to live in the Arctic, but those who do stay close to communities and shelters that can keep them warm and safe. There are a few unlucky souls, though, who have found themselves stranded alone in the barren wilderness of the Arctic. Many of them die, but some have struggled through incredible hardships—and survived. Featured image credit: dashpointpirate.typepad.com Bruce Gordon Trained A Pet Polar Bear Photo credit: Return Of Kings In 1757, Bruce Gordon was thrown overboard when his ship was smashed between two icebergs. He landed on a sheet of ice and watched as his crewmates disappeared into the ice floe.

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25 of the Most Breathtaking and Dangerous Flowers

Sacred Datura Look at the pretty flower with sweetly fragrant white trumpets often tinted purple! What’s that? Oh, ingestion of plant material can induce auditory and visual hallucinations and potentially lethal side effects. Good to know. Via: Flickr Swaddled Babies (Anguloa Uniflora) How guilty would you feel if you accidentally squashed one of these? The large, fragrant, creamy-white, waxy flowers usually bloom in the spring and summer, and are overwhelmingly fragrant — unlike babies at most

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Top 10 Activated Charcoal Uses & Benefits

Top 10 Activated Charcoal Uses & Benefits Activated Charcoal Uses & Benefits Activated charcoal is a potent natural treatment used to trap toxins and chemicals in the body, allowing them to be flushed out so the body doesn’t reabsorb them. It’s made from a variety of sources, but when used for natural healing, it’s important to select activated charcoal made from coconut shells or other natural sources.

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10 Daily Life Food Items Which Have Poisonous Vari

2. Castor Seeds and Castor Oil Castor Bean Seeds Castor bean seed oil is used in candies and chocolates and to treat stomach aches. Castor oil is carefully prepared because castor bean seed is lethally poisonous and only one raw seed is enough to kill a human being and 4 seeds kill a horse. On exposure to the skin, it causes skin allergies and reactions.

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The Drifter

  The Drifter Even when God makes a little thing, it is great because of the wisdom displayed in making it. The microscope has taught us the greatness of God in creating tiny creatures of wondrous beauty, yet so small as not to be perceptible to the naked eye. “The works of the Lord are great.” —Charles Spurgeon, Exposition of Psalm 111 Take two breaths. For one of them, you can thank the plankton, in particular the single-celled photosynthetic drifters that compose the phytoplankton of the world ocean. Remarkably, these elegant, microscopic cells perform nearly half of the photosynthesis and consequent oxygen production on Earth—equivalent to the total amount of photosynthetic activity of land plants combined. These tiny single cells have transformed the ocean, atmosphere, and terrestrial environment and helped make the planet habitable for a broad spectrum of other organisms, including ourselves. In many cases, blooms of phytoplankton reach such densities that they change the color of ocean surface waters and are even visible from satellites orbiting Earth. Every schoolchild knows that baleen whales, the biggest animals in the sea, subsist on huge quantities of krill, which are small zooplankton. But ocean food webs (the linkages between predators and prey) are far more intricate than this familiar example. Many types of plankton eat other plankton. . . . Some plankton have the ability to function as plants (carrying out photosynthesis) and animals at the same time. Others secrete elaborate mineral skeletons of calcium carbonate or silica. Still others live in complex symbiotic relationships with partner organisms. One type of gelatinous zooplankton—the appendicularians—has remarkably fine mesh feeding filters that trap the smallest bacteria in the ocean, leading to a size difference between the consumer and prey comparable to the size difference between whales and krill. Most fishes also eat some types of planktonic prey, especially in the crucial larval stages when availability of just the right kind of zooplankton at the right time and place can determine their survival. When Pyrocystis lunula is disturbed, it glows with a beautiful blue light.

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Marine life by May Ram

Marine life Seaweed    Scientific names: More than 9,000 species exist, including Ascophyllum, Chondrus, Ecklonia, Fucus, Gelidium, Gracilaria, Laminaria, Phaeophycota, Pterocladia, and Rhodophyceae. Common names: Seaweed is also known as brown seaweed, red seaweed, algae, kelp, egg wrack, kombu/konbu, sea spaghetti, wakame, nori, dulse/dillisk, sea lettuce, sea grass, carrageenin, and Irish moss.

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15 Beautiful But Deadly Animals by May Ram

15 Beautiful But Deadly Animals If animals could speak, they would spend most of their time calling us morons  to get off their territory. The traits we think of  “cute or beautiful” are often tricks animals have developed to get people to throw them food. They are hard wired for survival, and if the heavens made them one of the most adorable, docile looking creatures on earth, that has absolutely nothing to do with this drive. In the animal kingdom, looks can be deceiving. A seemingly hug-gable creature with big brown eyes and fluffy fur could be a deadly killing machine in disguise. Most animals will do whatever is necessary to remain free, procreate, protect their young, keep their territory, and eat a belly full of something scrumptious. Here are 15  animals that you’ll probably want to run away from, no matter how adorable they look on those wall calendars.   15. Wolverine (Gulo gulo) Source: (Link) The wolverine is a stocky, thick furry and muscular animal. With short legs, broad and rounded head, and small eyes with short rounded ears, it resembles a cute little bear you would want to cuddle with.

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Top 10 Deadliest Snakes in the World by May Ram

9.Python (Burmese) Pythons are non-venomous snakes. The Burmese Python (Python molurus bivittatus) is the largest subspecies of the Indian Python and one of the 6 largest snakes in the world, native to a big variation of tropic and subtropic areas of Southern  and Southeast Asia. They are often found near water and are sometimes semi-aquatic, but can also be found in trees. Wild individuals average 3.7 meters (12 ft) long,[1][2] but may reach up to 5.8 meters (19 ft).

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10 Otherworldly Subterranean Creatures

The Spider-Hunting Labyrinth Bug Photo credit: Los Angeles Times Phasmatocoris labyrinthicus is the only creature on our list with fairly decent eyesight, which it needs to presumably take flight and travel to entirely new caves in search of a mate. As a species of true bug—the order Hemiptera—its mouthparts are fused into a single beaklike straw, which it uses to inject paralyzing venom into its prey and suck out their liquefied innards.

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10 Sensational Spider Species

Sowbug Killer Spider Photo credit: Hans Hillewaert For various reasons, many people dislike sowbugs, more correctly known as woodbugs or woodlice, despite their actual classification as crustaceans. The name “sowbug killer spider” or “woodlouse hunter spider” will make this spider seem welcome to those experiencing a woodbug infestation.

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Rice – Natural Beauty throughout History

Rice – Natural Beauty throughout History Rice has been used as a natural beauty treatment for thousands of years to relieve inflammation associated with skin diseases and for cleansing and softening of the skin. Traditionally, female rice farmers in Japan used to bathe and wash in the water used for cleaning white rice. Beauty Secrets of Ancient Japan Rice is Japan’s most important crop and has been cultivated across the country for over 2000 years. In fact, rice plants have been traced back to 5000 BC, but the practice of rice growing is believed to have originated in areas of China, and southern and eastern Asia, in about 2000 BC. It is the primary staple food of the Japanese diet and of such fundamental importance to the Japanese culture that it was once used as a currency, and the word for cooked rice (gohan) has become synonymous with the general meaning of ‘meal’. Japan was closed to the outside world for many centuries by the fierce ruling shoguns, but stories persisted about this intriguing land where the native women had the smoothest beautiful skin and lustrous flowing silky hair. They were said to possess some secret knowledge of how to enhance beauty. At the time, Japanese women used ancient traditional methods to maintain their skincare regime and keep their skin smooth and pale and their hair silky. It was known that ingredients such as rice bran, camellia seeds, and many local plants and seaweeds could be used as beauty care. Many of these beauty ingredients are still used today in various forms as research in the cosmetics industry has demonstrated that some ancient beauty traditions were effective for skin and haircare.

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10 Secrets Of Ancient Footprints

Happisburgh Footprints Photo credit: Martin Bates, British Museum via National Geographic In 2014, on a storm-battered English beach, scientists stumbled upon the oldest human footprints outside of Africa. The prints are 850,000 years old, making them half a million years older than Europe’s previously oldest known prints. The 49 tracks show a mixed-age group heading south along what is believed to have once been the Thames Estuary. A storm surge exposed the prints. Within weeks, the surf eroded them away. It is sheer coincidence that the team that found the prints was working on another site 180 meters (600 ft) away.

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Animal Facts by May Ram

5 Interesting Facts About Australasian Gannets NOVEMBER 26, 2016 | DARREN POKE Here is an Australasian gannet looking for some fish to eat I was recently selected an an ambassador for the Dolphin Research Institute which raises awareness about the importance of coastal conservation.  I went on a really cool boat trip with them this week and saw some Australasian gannets. Here are five interesting facts about them: These large seabirds grow up to 95 cm long and have a wingspan of 1.6 metres. Like other gannets, they have an amazing hunting technique, flying about 10 metres above the water and then fold their wings in and dive into the water to catch fish or squid. Australasian gannets have a special bill with serrated edges that helps them to grip their slippery prey in the water. They breed in huge colonies on offshore islands.  They lay their eggs on the ground and they don’t reach breeding age until they are about 6-7 years old. Australasian gannets are found off the southern coast of Australia, Tasmania and New Zealand.  They are quite common throughout most of their range. I hope that you found these facts interesting and learned something new. Are there any other interesting facts that you would like to share about Australasian gannets?

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10 Obsolete Mental Disorders

Gender Identity Disorder In 2012, the DSM removed “gender identity disorder.” This obsolete diagnosis meant that transgender people were considered mentally ill. This had long been considered stigmatizing by gender rights activists. By removing the categorization, there is no longer anything pathological about having a transgender identity. Gender identity disorder was replaced with “gender dysphoria.” This new categorization only focuses on those who are distressed with their gender identity. While some consider this to be a significant change, others are less impressed. Supporters claim that gender dysphoria was left in the DSM in case transgender people need access to health care. Some do not think enough headway has been made. However, it is hard to argue that things are not progressing. In the 1990s, transgender people with grouped with pedophiles by the Americans With Disabilities Act.

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10 Amazing Examples Of Ancient Construction

Quirigua Guatemala Photo credit: Stuardo Herrera Built and completed by the Maya sometime between AD 200 and 800, Quirigua contains exemplary examples of Mayan architecture as well as one of the largest stelae (carved stone monuments) in existence. Stela E weighs in at an astonishing 65 tons. Stelae were commonly built to commemorate the passage of time or otherwise important events.

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10 Mysterious Ancient Buildings

Tomb Of China’s First Emperor Photo credit: Wikimedia Most people know of the Terracotta Warriors. These thousands of individual statues were placed around tomb of the Emperor to guard him in death. Records suggest that the Emperor is entombed in a palace built for him underneath a hill. We can see the hill, and there is evidence of empty spaces within. But the Chinese government will not allow excavation of the central tomb. This may seem perverse, but there is good reason to take our time. The scientific processes available to us are improving all the time. When the first terracotta warriors were unearthed, the pigments on them flaked away within seconds of exposure to air. Who knows what damage opening the tomb may cause?

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10 Forgotten Female Warriors Who Shocked The Ancie

Rhodogune Photo credit: co-geeking.com Rhodogune was a Parthian princess in the second century BC. According to the Greek historian Polyaenus, the fearsome Rhodogune was taking a bath one day when she heard that a local tribe was revolting. She immediately jumped out of the water and vowed not to bathe or wash her hair until the rebels were defeated. Unfortunately, the war that followed was “tedious,” but the revolting Rhodogune eventually led her forces to victory against the revolting rebels. She immediately retired to her bath and thoroughly washed her hair. However, Polyaenus says that her statues and seals always depicted her with unkempt hair from that day on in honor of her great and smelly victory. 

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Top 10 Fantastic and Surreal Creatures

Top 10 Fantastic and Surreal Creatures TYB APRIL 7, 2010 This is a list of some of nature’s creations that simply defy human imagination. Unlike the Little Known Prehistoric Monster lists, this one depicts only species that are alive today. They may not be as big or scary, but these creatures are certainly fantastic and deserve more attention than they usually get.   10 Olm Proteus anguinus This amphibian, native to the deepest, darkest caves of Europe (most famously in Slovenia) and mistakenly identified in ancient times as a “baby dragon” has to be one of the most bizarre animals in the world. Completely blind, and lacking body pigmentation almost completely, the olm lives in a very alien sensory universe. Despite being blind, it can pick up both chemical and electrical signals via receptors on its entire body, which comes in handy to find the small invertebrates it feeds upon. Completely aquatic, the olm has a soft, pale skin that resembles somewhat that of a very pale human being, hence its local nickname of “human fish”. There’s a second subspecies of olm, the black olm, which is just as interesting but a tad less bizarre, since it has eyes and lacks the pale complexion of its cousin.

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Top 10 Mystifying Mountains

Ahuna Mons Photo credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA/LPI via Space.com Ahuna Mons (aka “the Pyramid”) is located “in the middle of nowhere” on the dwarf planet Ceres, which mystifies NASA’s Dawn spacecraft mission science team member Paul Schenk, a geologist at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, Texas. Normally, such formations are associated with craters. Nearly 6.5 kilometers (4 mi) high and 16 kilometers (10 mi) wide, the pyramid-shaped peak is also mysterious for another reason: Inexplicable “bright streaks” run down its sides, resembling the equally mysterious bright spots that appear inside Ceres’s Occator Crater.

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10 Weird Ways Disease Altered The World

Hookworm And Economic Development In The South Photo credit: CDC Hookworm is a parasite that lives in the human intestine, feeds on human nutrients, and can be transmitted through fecal matter. Hookworm can cause a rash and diarrhea, but hookworm disease can lead to more chronic symptoms. In the South during the early 1900s, hookworm disease slowly rose to epidemic proportions and resulted in lethargy, iron deficiency, and stunted growth.

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10 Shocking Myths About Electricity

Electricity Travels At The Speed Of Light Most people associate electricity with lightning at a very early age, and thus comes the misconception that electrons and electricity move at—or close to—the speed of light. Although it is true that the electromagnetic wave of energy travels along a conductor at 50 percent to 99 percent of the speed of light, it is important to realize that the actual electrons move very slowly, no more than a few centimeters per second.

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10 Archaeological Relics From The Life Of Jesus Ch

A Stone Dedicated By Pontius Pilate Photo credit: BRBurton Pontius Pilate was a real person. Years after sentencing Jesus to death, he built a sports stadium and dedicated it to Emperor Tiberius. Before the stadium, Pilate placed a stone slab that is shattered today but on which we can still read the words, “To the divine Augusti Tiberieum . . . Pontius Pilate . . . prefect of Judea . . . has dedicated this.” The slab tells us something about the real Pilate. First, his veneration of Emperor Tiberius is unusually celebratory. Tiberius generally didn’t accept the level of divination that Pilate offers him on this slab.

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Ridiculously Dangerous Chemicals

Batrachotoxin Photo credit: treehugger.com Batrachotoxin is a complex-looking molecule which is so lethal that 136 millionths of a gram would be deadly to a 68-kilogram (150 lb) human. To put this in perspective, that is about two grains of salt. This puts batrachotoxin among the most toxic of all chemicals. Batrachotoxin binds to the sodium channels in nerve cells. The role of these channels is vital in muscle and nerve functions. By forcing these channels open, this chemical removes all muscle control from the organism.

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10 Weapons That Backfired In Terrible Ways

The Novgorod-Class Battleships Photo credit: Netmate In the 1870s, the Russians built several Novgorod-class battleships to defend their interests in the Black Sea and the Dnieper River. The Russians had been inspired by a British shipbuilder who claimed that the ideal kind of warship was circular. In theory, these circular ships permitted a heavier gun armament for a given tonnage, were better protected from enemy gunfire, and were more maneuverable. However, the reality was far different.

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10 Mysterious Libraries

Silk Road Jewish Library Photo credit: haaretz.com An ancient library of nearly 1,000 manuscripts was discovered in a cave in Afghanistan. Containing Hebrew, Aramaic, Persian, Judeo-Arabic, and Judeo-Persian texts, the collection belonged to a Jewish family who once lived along the Silk Road. The texts contain poetry, personal letters, commercial records, and legal documents. The find sheds fascinating new light on the life, work, and family units of the Afghan Jewish community from the period. The documents are attributed to a Jewish family headed by patriarch Abu Ben Daniel.

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10 Oldest Geological Features On Earth

Oldest Water 2.64 Billion Years Photo credit: B. Sherwood Lollar et al. Two miles down a Canadian mine sits what used to be a prehistoric ocean floor. There, scientists tested a water pocket and were shocked when it proved to be the oldest H2O still on the planet. It even predates the development of multicellular life .

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10 Animal Poisons with Amazingly Specific Purposes

Heart Attacks Found in the Poison Dart Frog There’s a good chance you’re familiar with the poison dart frog – those brightly colored little frogs that are so poisonous you can die just from touching them – and they are definitely remarkable in a number of ways, but what’s truly incredible is the way these frogs create their batrachotoxin, the main neurotoxin responsible for all that killing.

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Top 10 Insane Moth Facts That Will Blow Your Mind

A Noisy Thief That Uses Chemical Camouflage Photo credit: Viren Vaz Most people know of the death’s-head hawkmoth from the The Silence of the Lambs. Although famous for the distinctive skull-like patterns on its thorax, this moth has other cool characteristics. The death’s-head likes to steal honey directly from fully guarded, occupied beehives, a feat that would be deadly for almost any other insect. To invade a beehive, the death’s-head must first get past ferocious guards that will generally attack and kill anything that attempts to enter the hive. The death’s-head achieves entry by raising its body and screeching loudly. Apparently, this screeching produces a calming effect that makes the guards and worker bees less likely to attack. A thick cuticle and relative immunity to bee venom helps to protect the death’s-head against any bees who aren’t as susceptible to the screeching. So the moth can acquire multiple stings during its risky entry into the hive, but usually, little damage is sustained.

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10 Diseases That Possibly Came From Outer Space

SARS Photo credit: CDC In 2002, the severe acute respiratory virus (SARS) first appeared in China. In no time, it had spread worldwide, keeping people too scared to leave their homes. It was undoubtedly deadly, but it was quickly contained. The sudden appearance of such a uniquely deadly disease gave many people, including scientists at England’s Cardiff Centre for Astrobiology, cause to wonder where it had come from. The scientists suspected that virus-filled space dust could have drifted down through the atmosphere and landed east of the Himalayas, where the stratosphere is at its thinnest.

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10 Eye-Popping Facts About Vision

Why We See In 3-D Three-dimensional vision helps with depth perception. Each eye views an object from a slightly different angle. Called binocular disparity, it helps the brain to gauge depth. It’s vital but not the only way to view the world in 3-D.

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10 Amazing Things We’ve Learned About The Solar Sy

We Crashed A Ship Into A Comet On Purpose SoPhoto credit: ESA The European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft orbited the 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko comet for two years. The craft took readings and even placed a lander on the surface.

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10 Bizarre Recent Ocean Discoveries

Tamu Massif Photo credit: IDOP The biggest volcano in the Solar System is Olympus Mons on Mars. Recently, its equal was found in the Pacific. Measuring 310,000 sq km (120,000 mi2), Tamu Massif lies deep underwater. Unlike some ancient sea features which first saw some air before eventually becoming submerged, Tamu Massif most likely never had any dry days. Even today, there are 2 kilometers (1.2 mi) of seawater above the volcano.

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10 Most Haunted Cities In The World

Edinburgh, Scotland Photo credit: Shadowgate The capital of Scotland has a very long and gruesome history. Look no further than the South Bridge Vaults. Built in the 18th century, the vaults were meant to house taverns and cobblers, but after a flood killed many poor souls in 1975, they were abandoned. The vaults remained forgotten until homelessness became a crime punishable by death.

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10 Creepy Abandoned Places

Suburbs Of Lehigh Acres, FL The Story of Lehigh Acres is sad and uniquely American. In the 1950s, Businessmen Gerald Gould and Lee Ratner (who got rich selling D-Con rat poison) divided up a huge stretch of land in southern Florida, owned by Ratner, into tiny half-acre parcels that they then sold to Northerners for low, low prices. At ten bucks down and ten a month, it seemed like a bargain; however, there was no infrastructure in place (schools, roads, running water) and very few houses were built. Many lots were resold when checks stopped coming in, and the place was still pretty barren by the ’80s.

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10 Species That Are Evolving Right Now

Fish In The Hudson River Are Adapting To Live With Chemicals

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2016, the year of wonder

2016, the year of wonder 2016 was a year with great scientific discoveries that changes the way we view our planet and the environment we live in. Specialists from various domains made incredible discoveries, set up various technologies, advanced in their studies and researches and made important contributions for the future. Here are some of the scientific news from the past 12 months: 1. The ninth planet of the Solar System   In January, two scientists from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) published a series of indirect evidence regarding the existence of a ninth planet in ourSolar System in the prestigious publication The Astronomical Journal. “Planet 9” would be 10 times more massive than the Earth and it would be orbiting 20 times further from the Sun than planet 8, Neptune -– located at a average distance from the Sun of 4,5 billion kilometers.

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10 Incredible Inventions Inspired By Plants And An

Robot That Leaps On Water Water Strider Photo credit: vocativ.com Pond-skimmer insects are able to walk on water thanks to the “skin” that covers every body of liquid. Known as surface tension, the molecules stick together in a force known as cohesion.

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10 Frozen Timepieces That Marked Death And Disaste

The Tsunami Clock Photo credit: Donnie MacGowan While the Hawaiian islands are seen as a paradise by many, they still face the wrath of nature on occasion. The city of Hilo, located on the Big Island, has itself faced two major tsunamis in the last century, the second of which was on May 23, 1960. One of the area’s famous landmarks, a green clock located in the low-lying suburb of Waiakea Town, survived the first tsunami but was heavily damaged by the second. Its hands are stopped at 1:04 AM, the time at which the first massive waves hit the island.

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10 Murder Victims Whose Bodies Were Found At Botto

Laynee Wallace Photo credit: WKYT In May 2015, the body of two-year-old Laynee Wallace was found at the bottom of a well in western Kentucky. Anthony Barbour, age 25, the boyfriend of the child’s mother, Kelsey Wallace, was arrested. He was living with them both when Laynee’s body was discovered. According to Barbour, Kelsey, an abusive mother, lost her temper and accidentally killed Laynee after Laynee had hurt her twin sister, Kynlee. Because Kelsey and Barbour were high on meth, Barbour didn’t want to call the police, so he helped Kelsey cover up the crime by bagging Laynee’s body and putting it into the trunk of his car, fetching a safe from an abandoned house, transferring Laynee’s corpse from the trunk into the safe, and lowering the safe with Laynee’s body inside it into the well. On the way to the well, he threw Laynee’s shirt and diaper from the car. Barbour said he changed his mind later and turned himself in to police.

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Rivers by May Ram

Rivers Irrawaddy River – The Spiritual River Of Burmese People The Irrawaddy River or the Ayeyarwady River is the longest river in Myanmar with the origin from the Kachin River. The Chindwin River is one of five tributaries of the Ayeyarwady River. Fishing by Net-Casting in Irrawaddy River » History of Irrawaddy River The Irrawaddy River plays an important role in history, economic development of Myanmar from the early period. It is used as a main means of transport of Burma ancestors and important trade routes between India and China. By 1886, the Irrawaddy River was used as a way for the British to ship rights and for the French to achieve a direct route to China. It was then used as a port of rice exports to meet the economic needs of the British. » Role of Irrawaddy River Up to now, the Ayeyarwady River is still used as the main trade transport route. It is considered the bridge which connects famous cities of Mandalay and Bagan with Yangon.

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Tsunamis From Ancient Times That Were Terrifying

The Oldest Tsunami During an effort to compile a database of Australia’s past tsunamis, researchers gleaned some fascinating facts. First, they found that the continent wasn’t at all immune to this destructive force of nature, as a hefty crop of 145 events proved. That number was three times the amount that had been expected.

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10 Terrifying Snake Invasions

Apartment Complex Photo credit: WSB-TV Paul Roberston and his wife, Shawn Davis, sued the manager of Bradford Gwinnett, a Norcross, Georgia, apartment complex, where they and other residents live alongside venomous snakes. The manager, they said, has been negligent in controlling snakes that invaded the property sometime in 2013. They’ve encountered half a dozen of the reptiles, including a rat snake and a 1.8-meter-long (6 ft) copperhead.

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Top 10 Recent Ancient Discoveries Beneath Cities

Britain’s Oldest Writing Photo credit: Museum of London Archaeology via New Scientist Britain’s oldest scribbles may reveal many firsts. In 2016, a cache of 405 wooden writing tablets were found beneath an underground river in the middle of London. These rare Roman communications were etched between AD 43 and AD 80, making them the earliest writing unearthed in the UK. Dating back to the year the Romans invaded Britain, the Latin phrases give new insights into London’s first community, a city that was erected by the invaders.

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10 Horrifying Haunted Villages Around The World

Prince Albert South Africa Photo credit: English Wikipedia user Charlesall The little village called Prince Albert, located in the Karoo in South Africa, dates back to 1762. Quite a few ghosts have accumulated here, but strangely enough, they all seem friendly.

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Top 10 Astonishing Lost And Found Objects

BMW Photo credit: limitedslipblog.com In June 2016, a man borrowed his buddy’s BMW so he could drive to a Stone Roses concert at Etihad Stadium in Manchester, England. He parked in a parking garage. After the concert, he forgot in which garage he’d parked. He searched and searched to no avail.

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10 Mysterious Books You Will Want To Own

Journeys Out Of The Body Photo credit: Live Science This non-New Age, lucid, rational book about astral projection is one of the finest about the subject. Robert Monroe was a businessman without any religious background who suddenly started experiencing going out of his body. Rational as he was, he visited a physician and a psychiatrist, who both concluded that nothing was wrong with him.

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10 Amazing Ways Colors Have Been Significant In Hi

Purple Proof Of Royalty Photo credit: Wikimedia In the Mediterranean, a sea snail, Bolinus brandaris, has a mucus that can be used to produce a purple dye. It would take some 250,000 poor sea snails to make just one ounce of this purple. Yet this was the only source of purple dye in the ancient world, so the color was very expensive. A pound of purple wool cost more than an average year’s wage at the time. It became status symbol for the rich and powerful. Ancient Rome, Egypt, and Persia all associated the color with royalty. Purple was prized greatly in the Byzantine Empire, where rulers wore purple, signed edicts in purple ink, and even their children were considered “born in the purple.”

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Top 10 Deepest Places on Earth

2. Mariana Trench The top five deepest trenches are all in the Pacific Ocean – the Tonga Trench, the Philippine Trench, the Kuril- Kamchatka Trench and the Kermadec Trench are all over 30,000 feet deep but the deepest of them all is the Mariana Trench, at an amazing 35,994 feet deep. Being the deepest in the world, it has been the subject of much exploration and at one point there was an intense competition between entrepreneur Richard Branson and film director James Cameron as to who could reach the bottom first.

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10 Incredible Things Seen By Humankind Only Once

A Hurricane In The South Atlantic Photo credit: NASA Large storms are a common enough occurrence in the North Atlantic, with an average of 12 tropical storms and six hurricanes per season, but since 1974, only nine tropical storms have been observed in the South Atlantic. The reasons for this are a lack of preexisting disturbances and a commonly high vertical wind sheer, which disrupts the formation of these powerful storms.

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OUR WORLD by May Ram

Coccolithophores Photo credit: mikrotax.org This object isn’t made from plastic or metal but from calcium carbonate. Known as a coccolith, this semi-organic structure is one of many kinds produced by single-celled algae called coccolithophores. Braarudosphaera bigelowii, the pentagonal species pictured above, is perfectly formed, almost as though it was factory-made. Twelve will cleave together to form a seamless dodecahedron about five microns in size.

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Mysteries Of The Sun Solved

Mysteries Of The Sun Solved Photo credit: NASA/SDO/AIA/LMSAL All planets and stars have magnetic poles, and they shift around all the time. On Earth, the poles flip every 200,000 to 300,000 years. Right now, we’re overdue.

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empowr 2017 by May Ram

  An empowr Mission Founder for 12 month        Hello my dear empowr citizens.  It has been sometimes that I have shared my thoughts and experience in public.  My apology. 🌻☺     I am very happy to share my recent experience with all of you. If you read our empowr President Brian’s Post  and Our empowr leader JC’s post  you all may already be aware of where our empowr is heading and what the benefits of the mission roles, especially Mission  Founders.   As always I don’t missed out a great opportunity to become a Mission founder.  I subscribed to become a Mission Founder on August 18. But it was a monthly subscription. Now I have decided to subscribe yearly.  Lucky for me I can subscribe with Pro-rate and a 50% discount.    Here is the step by step procedure.  Go to Mission Role page here⇒ Mission Role Page Select the founder, I got this page.     I clicked on OK. And click on “ Goodwill Code”.    Enter the code and click on “set”.  http://prntscr.com/gdvnbr     The auto charge to my PayPal because my account is validated (protected) with my PayPal.    After clicking on “Yearly” selection.    Now I am an empowr Mission Founder for 12 months till August 28, 2018.  ================== How to get Goodwill Code? Please ask your Success Coach to get one. If you have questions regarding to this post, please contact me. I will reply within 24 hours.              I am here,  as always.       May

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Top 10 Unsolved Mysteries In Physics

Can We Have A Unified Theory? In the 20th century, two great theories were developed that explained a lot about physics. One was quantum mechanics, which detailed how tiny, subatomic particles behaved and interacted. Quantum mechanics and the standard model of particle physics have explained three of the four physical forces in nature: electromagnetism and the strong and weak nuclear forces. Its predictions are amazingly accurate, even though people still argue about the philosophical implications of the theory.

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Top 10 Rare Discoveries Involving Ancient Rituals

Top 10 Rare Discoveries Involving Ancient Rituals Jana Louise Smit September 1, 2017 Rituals are as old as mankind’s first thought. Modern ceremonies are mostly religious, but in the past, they held a wider purview. From initiation into adulthood to astronomy to honoring the gods, there were rituals for everything—even disposing of enemies and bringing meaning to cannibalism. The physical remains left by ancient rituals give archaeologists a deeply personal glimpse into long-gone societies. Sometimes, these finds confirm long-held beliefs. Other times, they’ve turned them on their heads.         Paleolithic People ‘Killed’ Rocks Photo credit: New Historian A new angle opened up in archaeology when researchers scrutinized small rocks. These were found in a cave in Italy called Caverna delle Arene Candide.[1] Around 12,000 years ago, an Upper Paleolithic community used the site to bury 20 individuals. Considered a crucial archaeological area since the 1940s, there were plenty of things in the cavern to distract attention away from several oblong pebbles. More recently, however, archaeologists realized that around 29 of the stones did not come from the cave and had been brought from the nearby beach. Each appeared purposefully broken and had missing pieces that could not be found anywhere in the large cavern. This could be evidence of a kn

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E-reader: 13 useful tips when buying an e-reader

 4: How big of an e-reader screen should be? Most e-readers have a screen with a diagonal of 6 inches (15.24 centimeters). This fits in every bag and in many cases in coat pockets, so you always have a stack of books on hand. Ideal road to read a novel. Larger screens are also available, sometimes even with a diagonal of more than 10 inches. This tablet-like e-readers are especially useful for business use (paper usage drop dramatically) or for example, to read textbooks. In some cases these have e-readers on a TFT screen with color. The advantage is that these screens react faster than e-ink, but reading less pleasant and the battery life is considerably shorter.

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Top 10 Incredible Sound Phenomena

Sonic Weaponry Photo credit: US Navy/Photographer’s Mate 3rd Class Tucker M. Yates The earliest idea of a sonic weapon was researched in secret by Hitler’s chief architect and minister of armaments and war production, Albert Speer, but it never saw light or sound due to the termination of the Nazi regime. The acoustic cannon would have been able to produce a deafeningly focused, insanely amplified sound beam that could vibrate a person’s body so vigorously that anyone standing within 90 meters (300 ft) would horrifically die if exposed for more than 30 seconds.[4] Since the 1950s, sonic weaponry has undergone serious investigation and dev

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10 Fantastic Little-Known Felines

Asiatic Golden Cat Photo credit: scientificamerican.com The thick-furred Asiatic golden cat is known for having black, red-brown, gray, russet, golden-brown, or brown fur. These medium-sized felines are found in forests and rocky areas in Southeast Asia. Not much is known about these rare felines.

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10 Unexpected Things The World Is Running Out Of

Nurses A lot of factors go into this deficit. First off, the number of elderly is increasing dramatically. From 2010 to 2030, the number of senior citizens in the US alone will increase by 75 percent, to 69 million. That means one in five people will be a senior.[11] This is an overwhelming number, given the decreased amount of nurses in the US, because 80 percent of older adults have at least one chronic condition, and 68 percent have two.

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10 Natural Things You Won’t Believe Actually Exist

Living Rocks Photo credit: Scientific American Rocks can be found everywhere. If you look inside your shoes after walking on a trail, chances are you are carrying some with you. They are dry, rough, and hard. But sometimes, you can find one that bleeds.

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10 Truly Devastating Disasters Caused By Sleep Dep

Chernobyl Perhaps the best-known disaster on this list, the Chernobyl accident occurred on April 26, 1986. Due to a series of mistakes by plant operators, the No. 4 reactor was running on dangerously low power, which left it unstable.

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10 Interesting But Discredited Theories

Recapitulation Theory Otherwise known as biogenetic law, recapitulation theory was first formulated by German scientist Ernst Haeckel in 1866. In layman’s terms, he believed the development of an embryo matched the evolutionary development of an organism’s ancestors. He even had a catchy motto, scientifically speaking: “Ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny.”[11] The single-celled fertilized ova we begin as were believed to refer to amoeba-like ancestors, with later stages resembling different creatures such as fish.

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10 Paranormal Events Linked To Mass Tragedies

Living Dead When Sorpong Peou was seventeen he witnessed his father Nam, a government official, being forced into a blue truck and taken away in his native Cambodia. This occurred in the dark years between 1975 and 1979 during which it is estimated that 1.7 million people were murdered by the Khmer Rouge led by Pol Pot. Since that time 309 mass grave sites with an estimated 19,000 grave pits have been unearthed. So it is understandable that when Nam did not return, Sorpong could only assume his father was one of the victims.

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10 Fascinating Facts About Mongolia

Huge Statue of a Great Leader/Genocidal Maniac/Your Ancestor Just outside Ulaanbaatar, sits a 131-foot tall statue of Genghis Khan. We can understand why, he did found the country—but he also killed millions. It would be kind of like finding a Statue of Lenin in Seattle. Sure, everyone in the area thinks the guy is cool, but . . . the mass murdering is problematic, surely.

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10 Deserted Towns That You’ll Want To Visit

Craco, Italy Photo credit: Idefix Craco is a beautiful hillside town that has been left abandoned for more than 50 years. The former medieval village sits in the countryside of Southern Italy and provided excellent views and warnings of potential attackers.

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Top 10 Spookiest Declassified Project Stargate Doc

Mars Exploration Photo credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum) By 1984, army remote viewer Joe McMoneagle had progressed to the top ranks of the CIA remote viewing hierarchy. Among dozens, if not hundreds, of missions geared toward fighting communism and terrorism and instigating foreign regime change, McMoneagle was sent on one mission quite unlike any of his others.

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Top 10 Unknown History Lessons Of The 20th Century

Genius Babies From 1980 to 1999, over 200 babies were born using the sperm of Nobel Prize winners, high-IQ individuals, and athletes. The project was founded by a Southern California tycoon named Robert K. Graham. Graham’s goal was to create a better generation through the use of positive eugenics. At the time, the project was controversial, with opinions ranging from it being elitist to straight-up genocidal. Nevertheless, the effort lasted for almost 20 years, with many babies being born.

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Is Coffee Good for You? — 11 Health Benefits

9. Lowers Your Risk of Colorectal Cancer A variety of compounds in coffee may help to prevent cancer, either individually or in combination. Polyphenols have antioxidant properties and laboratory studies have shown that they can reduce the growth of colon cancer cells.

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Why Our Metabolism Slows Down by Aging

Metabolic Changes in Aging As our body slows down, we lose muscle, gain weight and experience a loss of energy.  These metabolic changes do not just make us feel lethargic and expand our waistlines; they also accelerate aging. Geroscientists have lots of evidence to prove their point. In his landmark review, lead author Carlos López-Otín also says, Collectively, current available evidence strongly supports the idea that anabolic signaling accelerates aging, and decreased nutrient signaling extends longevity.

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10 Technological Advances That Animals Had First

Retractable Blades The humble domestic cat strikes again with a scratch of genius. Its claws can be released or sheathed at will, keeping the claws sharp and preventing the cat from injuring itself when using its paw to wash its face.[10] The claws can be drawn back into soft integral sockets in the cat’s paw, keeping them out of harm’s way.

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10 of the Oldest Universities in the World

University of Paris Location: France Established in: 1160-1250 Established between 1160 and 1250 in the French capital, the University of Paris, often known as ‘la Sorbonne’, is known to have been one of the first established universities in Europe. As history goes, the University of Paris was suspended from operating between 1793 and 1896, following the French

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10 Bizarre Organisms From The Burgess Shale

Wiwaxia Photo credit: burgess-shale.rom.on.ca We have seen that the primordial seas were swimming in predators. It’s no wonder that evolution soon developed defensive characteristics to allow animals to avoid being eaten.

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10 Crazy Newly Discovered Living Animal Species

The River Rider Inia Araguaiaensis Photo credit: Nicola Durta/National Geographic Many entries on this list are captivating, but the documentation of new insect or fish species may not be too surprising. What may shock you, though, is the recent discovery of a new species of dolphin. All dolphins are mammals and among the most intelligent creatures on the planet. They’re highly social and altruistic and live in pods with their peers. There are also a number of dolphin species that live in rivers. River dolphins have long, thin snouts and are slower swimmers with poorer vision compared to their oceanic counterparts.

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For Your Brain

  Jogging the Brain By GRETCHEN REYNOLDSNOV. 22, 2016 Continue reading the main storyShare This Page  Share  Tweet  Pin  Email  More  Save   Photo CreditIllustration by Renaud Vigourt The holiday season is a good time for a reminder that alcohol can do bad things to the brain. Studies on animals suggest that it reduces the number of neurons in the hippocampus, the brain’s memory center, and weakens mitochondria there. Because mitochondria help produce energy within cells, their impairment can damage or kill brain cells. But two new animal studies offer some succor: Aerobic exercise, it turns out, may meliorate some of the impacts of heavy drinking on the brain.

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Nanotechnology by May Ram

Medical research Heart tissue cryogenics breakthrough gives hope for transplant patients Successful freezing and rewarming of tissue sections by US team avoids damage by infusing the them with magnetic nanoparticles, paving way for entire organs  Freezing and rewarming sections of heart tissue successfully raises hopes for doing the same for the entire organ. Photograph: Sebastian Kaulitzki/Alamy Wednesday 1 March 2017 19.00 GMTLast modified on Thursday 2 March 2017 17.14 GMT   Scientists have succeeded in cryogenically freezing and rewarming sections of heart tissue for the first time, in an advance that could pave the way for organs to be stored for months or years.

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10 Most Important Missions In NASA’s History

💎Gemini IV Photo credit: NASA James McDivitt While the Mercury missions taught us the basics of orbit, the Gemini missions showed us the techniques needed to go to the Moon. One of the most important activities on the Moon was spacewalking, leaving the capsule and going out into the vacuum of space. As this had never been attempted by the US, it was absolutely critical to practice before trying it on the Moon.

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10 Incredible Things Scientists Did With DNA For T

Gene Theft A water organism called the tardigrade recently took genetic weirdness to the next level. The creature’s genome was sequenced to discover more about its super abilities. These microscopic invertebrates can survive space, freezing and boiling point temperatures, unbelievable pressure, radiation, and a decade without food and water.

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10 Toxic Bodies Of Water

Berkeley Pit Mass-Murders Snow Geese Photo credit: Jurgen Regel, Marian On November 28, 2016, a large flock of geese landed on a small body of water in Butte, Montana, known as Berkeley Pit. It is estimated that roughly 10,000 geese landed in the water, and thousands of them died.

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Top 10 Bizarre Facts About The Ocean Deep

Why All The Cool Stuff Hangs Out On The Coast Photo credit: NOAA Have you ever wondered why all the fish and little invertebrates like to hang out on the coast, where people can constantly bother them, rather than enjoying solitude out in the open ocean? In a word:

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10 Strange And Mysterious Islands

Bannerman Island Photo credit: Antony-22 Bannerman Island, in the Hudson River, is a half-hour boat ride from New York City. There’s no other way to get there. Visitors to the mysterious island are likely to wonder why there’s a castle on it. The edifice was built by Frank Bannerman VI, who made a fortune by reselling surplus military equipment he bought at government auctions at the end of the US Civil War.

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10 Hot Facts About Volcanoes by May Ram

Mauna Kea And Mauna Loa When discussing volcanoes, the giants Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa must be mentioned. They are massive shield volcanoes that loom ominously over the island of Hawaii. In fact, they are so huge that they make up most of Hawaii.

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10 Bodies Of Water That Want You Dead by May Ram

Lake Kivu Border Of DRC And Rwanda Three hundred meters (1,000 ft) below the surface of Lake Kivu lies a ticking time bomb. Over 250 cubic kilometers (60 cubic miles) of carbon dioxide, along with around 65 cubic kilometers (15 cubic miles) of methane gas, lurks under this body of water, enough to provide electricity to several countries. Problem is, it’s also enough to flood every nearby settlement, killing thousands in the process. Right now, all those gases are dormant, but all it would take is one volcanic eruption (and with the many volcanoes nearby, that’s always a possibility), and the gases would rush to the top, resulting in massive destruction for the area.

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Turmeric Benefits, an Anti-Inflammatory Spice

Conventional Medicine Recently, the use of turmeric as an integrative approach to treating medical problems has gained further popularity. Its use has been recommended by many well-known physicians. One claim is that drinking turmeric tea helps to reduce stress and calm the mind. Another physician who hosts a popular television show suggests that consuming turmeric can help relieve the pain caused by the inflammatory effects of osteoarthritis and can be important to gut health, as it may relieve abdominal symptoms caused by acid reflux.

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Top 13 Essential Oils and How They Can Benefit You

2. Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) Rosemary is a common herb that is often grown in home gardens. It has been shown to have many health benefits and, according to an article in New York Times, rosemary plays a big part in the diet of one of the world’s healthiest and oldest living populations, those who reside in Acciaroli, Italy. Rosemary can be used for the following:

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9 Mysteries Of Evolution

Why Did Human Ancestors Leave Africa? Approximately 50,000 years ago (though approximate dates are still widely debated), human ancestors began to leave the African continent, an act which required a lot of labor and risk for little conceivable reward (especially considering humans were already living right at sustenance level).

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6 Signs You’re Addicted To Your Morning Coffee

6 Signs You’re Addicted To Your Morning Coffee ​And how not to feel like walking death when you’re trying to cut back BY ISADORA BAUM APRIL 3, 2017     Getty Images Some days, your morning cup of coffee is the only thing pushing you out of bed, out the door, and into the ranks of productive society. Okay, so you can’t imagine your day without that cup of joe. But that doesn’t mean you’re addictedto it, right? Actually, you very well may be. The phenomenon is so common today that withdrawal from it is actually considered a real, medical mental disorder. In fact, it’s included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, which is used by medical professionals as a classification and diagnostic tool. “You can become addicted to caffeine if you’re used to drinking as little as 100 milligrams (mg) per day or the equivalent of one cup of coffee,” says Partha Nandi M.D., F.A.C.P, the creator and host of the medical lifestyle television show, “Ask Dr. Nandi.” Your body gets used to the stimulant, so you can experience a withdrawal when you don’t consume it. Here are 6 surprising signs that your body is dependent on caffeine—and what you can do to avoid, or ease out of, a nasty withdrawal. Getty Images SIGN YOU’RE ADDICTED TO CAFFEINE: YOU GET POUNDING HEADACHES IN THE MORNING

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10 Fascinating Things That Happen To The Human Bod

What’s That Smell? Photo credit: NASA When you think of space travel, you probably don’t give much thought to the aromas your sniffer will be faced with on your long journey to what is hopefully your new planetary home. If you

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10 Major Archaeological Discoveries Made In 2017

No Ecocide on Easter Island A genetic study published this year adds to the growing archaeological evidence which aims to debunk the myth of the Easter Island “ecocide”—the notion that the Rapa Nui people caused their own demise through warfare and deforestation.

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10 Surprising Traits That Are Hereditary

10 Surprising Traits That Are Hereditary CASSIE LEIGH NOVEMBER 13, 2017 Some traits are easily recognized as pieces of our DNA. Hair and eye colors, height, and the shape of our noses can typically be found in one or both of our parents. Ailments such as high blood pressure or mental illness have a hereditary factor, too. Most traits commonly associated with our genetics are physical. We tend to believe that the way we behave and our personal preferences stem from our environment, lifestyle, and experiences. In reality, genetics play a large role in these factors as well. Here are 10 surprising traits for which you can thank (or blame) your parents. How Nice You Are Your capacity for kindness and empathy is predetermined by your DNA. A certain gene produces a receptor for oxytocin, the “love hormone.” The receptor determines how much compassion you are inclined to show toward others.

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10 Freaky Things You Won’t Believe T... by May Ram

They Employ Bodyguards It’s kind of obvious that a tree is a lump of trunk that cannot shoo away any animals interested in a nibble. While it cannot help itself, this doesn’t mean that trees are now on the free menu. They are known for hiring bodyguards, and nothing keeps a hungry herbivore away like an ant up the nose.

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Applied Life Science News, 2017

Chilled bacteria lose their rhythm © NNehring/E+/Getty Cyanobacteria’s daily rhythms come to a halt when it is cooled, but are revived by pulses of heat. Circadian rhythms are biological processes that repeat over a roughly 24-hour cycle, such as sleep and digestion, but the rhythmicity disappears in many organisms if they get too cold. A Japanese team including researchers from Kyushu University cooled a test tube containing KaiC proteins — which regulate a daily surge in gene expression in cyanobacteria — and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) molecules.

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10 Islands With Interesting Animal Populations

Wild Horses On Assateague Island Photo credit: Lyndi & Jason Assateague Island is home to approximately 300 wild horses. The island lies off the coasts of both Maryland and Virginia and belongs to both states. The northern two-thirds of the island is part of Maryland, and a fence separates the southern Virginia portion of the island.

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10 Weird Anomalies And Bizarre Conspiracies Of The

The Moon’s Craters Are Strange The Moon is littered with craters from multiple impacts over the many years of its existence. To some, it is strange how uniform these craters look in terms of their depth. Accepted knowledge tells us that they should vary greatly in depth, yet they don’t.

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10 Places Frozen In Time

Hashima Island, Japan Photo credit: Jordy Meow At first glance, it’s not hard to see why this island was nicknamed “Battleship Island.” Approached from the water, it really does look like a giant concrete battleship, thanks to its high sea walls. But the history behind this small island isn’t nearly as pretty as its panoramic views.

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15 Beautiful But Deadly Animals by May

Bottlenose Dolphin Source: (Link) This cannot be right. These guys save humans. Every other year or so, some diver or something gets lost out at sea, these guys bring them home. Dolphins have been compared to humans on a number of fronts. They are intelligent, communicate with each other, have the ability to learn, do tricks, play jokes, and can almost use their fins as hands. What’s not to love? Some people even believe they have special healing powers. Swimming with dolphins can be a therapeutic and enlightening experience. It may be their eyes, their smiling face, their playful nature or their intelligence, but dolphins have won their way into our hearts.

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10 Remarkable But Scary Developments... by May Ram

They’re Starting To Outsmart Human Hackers https://youtu.be/OVV_k73z3E0 Hollywood movies portray hacking as sexy or cool. In real life, it’s not. It’s “usually just a bunch of guys around a table who are very tired [of] just typing on a laptop.” Hacking might be boring in real life, but in the wrong hands, it can be very dangerous. What’s more dangerous is the fact that scientists are developing highly intelligent AI hacking systems to fight “bad hackers.” In August 2016, seven teams are set to compete in DARPA’s Cyber Grand Challenge. The aim of this competition is to come up with supersmart AI hackers capable of attacking enemies’ vulnerabilities while at the same time finding and fixing their own weaknesses, “protecting [their] performance and functionality.”

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10 Historical Mysteries Solved In Recent Years

The Missing Swiss Couple Photo credit: Glacier 3000/Keystone/AP One day, Marcelin Dumoulin and his wife, Francine, went to a meadow near the Swiss village of Chandolin to feed and milk their cows. They weren’t seen again for 75 years.

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10 Things Humans have Saved from Extinction

Hamsters Early last century, a zoologist captured several strange and rare rodents in Syria. These had been described a century earlier and were named Syrian hamsters, or golden hamsters.

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10 Surprising Problems Solved By Nature

Lost On A Hike? Find Out Where You Are By Boiling Water If you’ve ever been hiking or mountain climbing, you might know the effects of low air pressure. Breathing gets harder, your vision might go blurry, people might faint much more easily, and every step takes twice the effort. Nature has a handy little trick for figuring out how thin the atmosphere is: boiling water.

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10 Incredible Plants That Belong In ‘Avatar’

The Glowing Mushroom Photo via Wikimedia While our forests don’t yet have the mythical bioluminescence of those in Avatar, there are many types of fungi that glow in the dark. One of the most spectacular has to be Mycena chlorophos, a Japanese mushroom that exudes a neon green glow as soon as the lights go out.

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Top 10 Unusual Islands

Attu Island Another westernmost island, this time the westernmost in the Aleutian Islands chain in Alaska. Although Attu Island is the Aleutians’ westernmost island, it actually lies in the Eastern hemisphere. Attu has a population of twenty, all of whom live and work in Attu Station, a United States Coast Guard LORAN (Long Range Aid to Navigation) facility. Apart from being the last island in the 1,200 mile (1,900 kilometer) long Aleutian Islands chain, Attu is also distinct in that it is the location of the only land-based conflict on American soil in all of World War II.

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Top 10 Proposed Intercontinental Bridges And Tunne

Bridge Of The Horns Asia And Africa Photo credit: NASA The Bridge of the Horns is a proposed bridge that will link Djibouti, which neighbors Somalia in the Horn of Africa, with Yemen. When completed, it will have six lanes for vehicles and a railroad for trains. Its construction was proposed by Tarek Bin Laden Construction, which is owned by the eponymous half-brother of the infamous Al-Qaeda kingpin.

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10 Ways Scientists Are Using Your Smartphone To Sa

Portable Microscope A portable microscope that can image a single virus has been created by scientists at UCLA. It fits on the back of a smartphone and is designed to be used in places that traditional lab equipment isn’t available. One possible use is for measuring viral loads in patient samples so that doctors in remote areas can monitor the effectiveness of treatments.

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10 Bionic Innovations That Could Revolutionize Med

Hand Photo credit: Newcastle University The 2006 movie Pan’s Labyrinth introduced a character with eyes in the palms of his hands. Although the movie is a fantasy, a bionic hand equipped its own artificial eye is a fact. The prosthesis uses artificial intelligence to “see” objects. The wearer’s intention to pick up an object is relayed, as electrical impulses, to the hand. The hand responds by taking a picture of the object. Then, using “one of four possible grasping positions,” the hand closes on the desired object, lifting it.

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Top 10 Cutting-Edge Innovations In The Future Of F

Hair And Eye Color Prediction A forensic procedure known as pheontyping allows investigators to predict a suspect’s hair and eye color, which means police need not depend on whether the person’s DNA profile is already stored in a database. Using 24 DNA variants that predict eye and hair color and six genetic markers, the HIrisPlex system can predict blonde hair 69.5 percent of the time, brown hair 78.5 percent of the time, red hair 80 percent of the time, and black hair 87.5 percent of the time.

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10 Incredible Implications Of Quantum Technology

Limitless Security

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Top 10 Fascinating Eggs

Dinosaur Eggs Dinosaur eggs sometimes contain fossilized baby dinosaurs inside, and offer a fantastic look into the past. Dinosaur eggs have many shapes. Some are elongated spheres, similar to many modern medical tablets. Others are teardrops, and still more are spherical. Some dinosaurs laid many eggs in a

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10 Obscure Mysteries Surrounding Forests Around Th

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10 Massive Things We Built And Then Destroyed

10 Massive Things We Built And Then Destroyed PATRICK FULLER JUNE 3, 2014 When the first modern human built the first permanent structure, it was fated that a rival would not rest until he had erected a larger one. We love big things, we’re fascinated with huge things, and we’re left in awe of massive things. But sometimes even the most massive of man-made objects becomes lost to time because of disaster or necessity. The Great Wheel Sure mankind loves big things, but we also love fun. We also happen to love money, and every once in a while, nostalgic childlike playfulness and the drive for money combine to create the colorful and often sticky environments known as carnivals. Carnivals and fairs are excellent venues for temporary structures large and small because the venues themselves are, of course, temporary.

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10 Impossible Things Physicists Just Made Possible

Metallic Hydrogen Photo credit: Silvera et al., Science It’s been called the “holy grail of high-pressure physics,” but until now, no scientist has ever succeeded in forging metallic hydrogen.[4] As a possible superconductor, it is a highly sought-after form of the normally gaseous element. The possibility of turning hydrogen into a metal was first proposed in 1935. Physicists theorized that massive pressure could cause the transformation. The problem was that nobody could produce that kind of extreme pressure.

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Top 10 Bizarre Apocalypse Scenarios

The Infertility Problem As you will already know, there are lots of men and women out there who cannot conceive. But did you know that the amount of people who cannot conceive is rising? And rising very fast might I add. So fast in fact that scientists predict it to be a very serious problem for the future of our species. There are a few theories about why infertility is on the rise. One is that pollution, or the chemicals in pollution, have over the years caused damage to our cells and in turn our reproductive system. Another one is that evolution has determined who can have kids and who can’t.

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10 Major Space Science Stories Of 2017

Finding The Missing Link Of Planet Formation Photo credit: European Space Agency Back in 2014, one of the biggest space-related news stories of the year was when the Rosetta spacecraft successfully landed the Philae module on a comet for the first time in history. It carried on with its mission until 2016, when Rosetta crash-landed on comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. During that time, the spacecraft sent a treasure trove of information back to the European Space Agency (ESA), and it seems that, even a year later, we are still finding out new things.

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15 Fascinating Planets Outside Our S... by May Ram

Most Exoplanets in One System 55 Cancri (55 Cancri b discovered April 12, 2006) This is quite similar to the previous one in that it is a binary star system, a two-star multiple star system just like Tatooine (which by the way has become a new scientific term describing planets in multiple star systems after the hypothetical HD 188753 Ab, which could have been the first of the “Tatooine planets” was hypothesized back in 2005 but was later disproved) from Star Wars, but this time it has five medium-size “Neptune-mass” planets orbiting around the larger star 55 Cancri A,

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10 Most Bizarre Planets You’ve Probably Never Hear

PSR J1719-1438 b The Diamond Planet Photo credit: futurism.com PSR J1719-1438 b is a planet made of pure diamond! A large, carbon-based planet with a diameter roughly five times that of Earth, PSR J1719-1438 b can be found about 4,000 light-years away from our solar system. Due to immense pressure caused by the planet’s gravitational pull, the carbon has been condensed, forming a gigantic diamond.

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10 Violent Events That Will Hit Our Solar System

Killer Cloud When researchers ran simulations, they discovered that our solar system might eventually hit a deadly space fog. The tiny specks may be lethal to all life on Earth.

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10 Hypothetical Astronomical Objects That Could Ac

Dyson Sphere The concept of a Dyson sphere was first introduced by Freeman Dyson, a physicist and astronomer who explored the idea through a thought experiment. He imagined a solar system–sized solar power collector. He believed a civilization could enclose its star in a cloud of satellite-type objects (or a “shell” or “ring of matter” in Dyson’s words) in order to beam 100 percent of the star’s radiation to a planet. Dyson created this thought experiment as a way to identify possible alien life in the universe. If we were to find a Dyson sphere, it could indicate the presence of a highly advanced alien civilization.

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10 Theories On How The Universe Will End

Heat Death Via Black Holes According to a popular theory, most matter in the universe is orbiting black holes. Just look at galaxies, which contain almost everything and house supermassive black holes in their centers. A large part of black hole theory involves the cannibalization of stars or even entire galaxies as they fall into the hole’s event horizon.

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10 Utterly Spectacular Volcanoes In ... by May Ram

Tiger Stripes Enceladus (Moon Of Saturn) Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons Saturn is by far one of the most interesting planets in our solar system, boasting not only a beautiful and complex ring but also 150 moons (some of which are so small they are given the adorable name of moonlets). One of the bigger members of the Saturn moon family is Enceladus, an icy orb which houses a strange geological phenomenon that astronomers have dubbed “Tiger Stripes.”

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10 Strange Theoretical Stars

Electroweak Star While the quark star would seem to be the last stage of a star’s life before it dies and becomes a black hole, physicists have recently proposed yet another theoretical star that could exist between a quark star and a black hole. Called the electroweak star, this theoretical type would be able to sustain equilibrium due to the complex interactions between the weak nuclear force and the electromagnetic force, collectively known as the electroweak force.

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10 Terrifying Planets You Don’t Want To Visit

51 Pegasi b Nick-named Bellerophon, in honor of the Greek hero who tamed the winged horse Pegasus, this gas giant is over 150 times as massive as earth and made mostly of hydrogen and helium. The problem is that Bellerophon roasts in the light of its star at over 1800 degrees F (1000 degrees C). Bellerophon’s star is over 100 times closer to it than the Sun is to Earth. For one thing,

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10 Fascinating Stars That Put Our Own To Shame

10 Fascinating Stars That Put Our Own To Shame JASON IANNONE OCTOBER 18, 2013 As far as stars go, ours is fairly ordinary and straightforward: a giant ball of absurdly hot gas that showed up a few billion years ago and has about a few billion left. But our sun is just one of at least 70 sextillion stars in the universe; with a number that huge, there are bound to be many far more interesting and bizarre than our own. Double Stars With Double Planets Circling Them To date, only four planets have been discovered orbiting a double-star system, which means Tatooine is even less likely to exist than you might have imagined. So when a recent double-star system was discovered with not one, but two planets orbiting around them, the reaction within the scientific community was nothing short of pure shock.

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10 Mind-Boggling Oceans That Exist I... by May Ram

Io’s Magma Ocean Photo via Wikipedia Io is the most volcanic body in our solar system. Boasting over 400 volcanoes, its surface is constantly plagued with explosions and lava flows. The reason for such violent and frequent volcanic activity can be explained by a global magma oceanlocated 50 kilometers (31 mi) beneath the moon’s surface.

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Top 10 Ways Space Could Destroy Civilization As We

Top 10 Ways Space Could Destroy Civilization As We Know It MEGAN MCLEAN SEPTEMBER 9, 2017 A starry sky on a warm summer’s night is a beautiful view to behold. We tend to focus mainly on the wonders of space—how it could save our planet, how we could make contact with other friendly civilizations, and how we could learn about natural marvels that we can only begin to imagine. However, behind the twinkling lights hide some of the most dangerous phenomena that we, as a species, have ever witnessed. From burning balls of gas to violent bursts of deadly radiation, here are 10 terrifying ways that space could destroy civilization as we know it. Asteroid Every day, Earth is pelted by dust and rocks falling from space. Luckily for us, most of this will burn up in the atmosphere. Unluckily for the dinosaurs, once every few million years, an asteroid the size of a small town hits.